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Full text of "Beeton's Book of Needlework"

Project Gutenberg's Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton

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Title: Beeton's Book of Needlework

Author: Isabella Beeton

Release Date: February 22, 2005 [EBook #15147]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BEETON'S BOOK OF NEEDLEWORK ***




Produced by Julie Barkley and the PG Online Distributed Proofreading
Team.






  BEETON'S BOOK

  OF

  NEEDLEWORK.




  CONSISTING OF

  DESCRIPTIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS,

  ILLUSTRATED BY

  SIX HUNDRED ENGRAVINGS,

  OF TATTING PATTERNS.

  CROCHET PATTERNS.

  KNITTING PATTERNS.

  NETTING PATTERNS.

  EMBROIDERY PATTERNS.

  POINT LACE PATTERNS.

  GUIPURE D'ART.

  BERLIN WORK.

  MONOGRAMS.

  INITIALS AND NAMES.

  PILLOW LACE, AND LACE STITCHES.




_Every Pattern and Stitch Described and Engraved with the utmost
Accuracy, and the Exact Quantity of Material requisite for each Pattern
stated._



CHANCELLOR PRESS



_Beeton's Book of Needlework_ was originally published in Great Britain
in 1870 by Ward, Lock and Tyler.





This facsimile edition published in Great

Britain in 1986 by

Chancellor Press

59 Grosvenor Street London W 1





Printed in Czechoslovakia 50617





SAMUEL BUTLER'S PREFACE


The Art of Needlework dates from the earliest record of the world's
history, and has, also, from time immemorial been the support, comfort,
or employment of women of every rank and age. Day by day, it increases
its votaries, who enlarge and develop its various branches, so that any
addition and assistance in teaching or learning Needlework will be
welcomed by the Daughters of England, "wise of heart," who work
diligently with their hands.

The recent introduction of Point Lace has brought a finer, and,
apparently, more difficult class of fancy work into general favour.
Ladies may now, however, confidently commence, with our patterns before
them, to reproduce Antique laces; for care and patience, with a
knowledge of Point Lace stitches, are alone required to perfect the
beautiful work, which, as shown in existing specimens of exquisite Old
Lace, constitute the chief glory of women's refined industry in past
centuries.

INSTRUCTIONS in TATTING, in EMBROIDERY, in CROCHET, in KNITTING and
NETTING, in BERLIN WOOL WORK, in POINT LACE, and GUIPURE D'ART are
prefixed to the pages devoted to these separate branches of needlework.
The whole work is interspersed with coloured and other Patterns in Point
Lace, Guipure d'Art, Tatting, Embroidery, and Designs for Monograms and
Initials for marking handkerchiefs and table-linen. The quantity of
materials required for each class of work is also given with every
pattern.

The idea of combining a series of minute and exact instructions in fancy
needlework with useful patterns was conceived some years ago by one
whose life was devoted to the inculcation of the practical duties of
woman's life, and to assisting her sex in their daily work of HOUSEHOLD
MANAGEMENT and REFINEMENT.

Her great wish was that her BOOK OF NEEDLEWORK should be as valuable in
its way to her Countrywomen as her work upon Household Management was
useful in showing the best mode of providing for the diurnal wants of
families. Other hands have brought to a conclusion her original plans.
The best attainable workers have contributed to this volume. Only those
who knew the extent of the late Mrs. Beeton's design, will miss, in the
pages now before them, "the touch of a vanished hand."

S.O.B.

_Paternoster Row,_ 1870.




CONTENTS.


TATTING INSTRUCTIONS

TATTING PATTERNS

EMBROIDERY INSTRUCTIONS

EMBROIDERY PATTERNS

CROCHET INSTRUCTIONS

CROCHET PATTERNS

KNITTING INSTRUCTIONS

NETTING INSTRUCTIONS

KNITTING AND NETTING PATTERNS

ALPHABETS FOR MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS

MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS

POINT LACE WORK

POINT LACE INSTRUCTIONS

POINT LACE PATTERNS

INSTRUCTIONS AND PATTERNS IN GUIPURE D'ART

BERLIN WORK INSTRUCTIONS

TATTING.




TATTING


INSTRUCTIONS

[Illustration: Tatting Shuttle.]

The needlework called Tatting in England, _Frivolité_ in French, and
_Frivolitäten_ in German, is a work which seems, from all accounts, to
have been in favour several generations ago. Modern ingenuity has
discovered some ways of improving on the original plan of tatting, which
was, indeed, rather a primitive sort of business as first practised. To
Mrs. Mee, one of our most accomplished _artistes_ in all matters
connected with the work-table, belongs, we believe, the introduction of
the plan of working from the reel instead of the shuttle. By this
alteration the advantage of the shuttle being constantly kept filled
with cotton was gained, and the necessity also obviated for frequently
joining the thread; and to Mdlle. Riego, equally distinguished in all
details appertaining to the employment of the needle, ladies are
indebted for an arrangement by which the same thread used in the making
of the pattern is used for fastening the work. The old plan only
provided for the working of the different portions which constituted the
pattern, and then these portions had to be sewn together with a needle
and thread. The ingenious workers on the Continent have also given much
attention of late to the art of tatting, and our instructions now
printed comprise what we consider the best mode of learning and doing
this exceedingly interesting and fashionable work.

[Illustration: Tatting Pin.]

Tatting differs entirely from crochet, and is composed of stitches
forming _knots_. It is intended as an imitation of point lace, and is
especially used for trimming under-linen, on account of its strength.

To make the stitches or knots a small instrument is used, called a
_shuttle_. This shuttle consists of two oval pieces, flat on one side
and convex on the other, and is made of wood or ivory.

The two oval pieces are joined together by a strong cross-piece. The
illustration shows the construction of the shuttle. These shuttles are
made in ivory, pearl, tortoiseshell inlaid with pearl, and silver; they
are also manufactured in coloured bone, black, red, and white. The best
to work with are the pearl for a white shuttle, and the inlaid
tortoiseshell for a black shuttle; the prices vary from sixpence to one
shilling and two-and-sixpence each. In selecting a shuttle be careful to
see that the ends close, as if dropped it soon becomes unthreaded, which
is very inconvenient. The cotton intended for the work is wound round
this shuttle, and the thickness of the cotton varies according to the
style of work. It is better to use the proper tatting cotton, because it
is stronger than the ordinary kinds; this is manufactured by Messrs.
Walter Evans and Co. for the purpose. Their Boar's Head Cotton is also
frequently used, and answers very well.


_Shuttles._

These are made in 3 sizes:--Finest, No. 1; No. 2, useful medium size;
No. 3, the largest.


_The Way to Hold the Hands._

Take the shuttle in the right hand, between the thumb and second finger,
and allow the forefinger to remain at liberty, and rest the under part
of the shuttle _between_ the second and third and _on_ the middle
finger. Place the thread round the three middle fingers of the left
hand, so as to form a loop, keeping the second and third fingers a
little apart, and bring the cotton again between the thumb and
forefinger, letting the end fall within the palm of the hand, while the
end of cotton which holds on to the shuttle passes over the thumb-nail.


_To Make a Stitch._

Keep the hands in the position above described; pass the shuttle at the
back, through the loop--that is, between the second and third fingers.
Take the end of the shuttle which comes out from the loop between the
forefinger and thumb of the right hand, and strain the cotton very
tightly towards the right. When the cotton is drawn through the loop,
this cotton must not be impeded by the fourth finger; it should, on the
contrary, slide over it, and be drawn tight. It should divide the loop
into two parts. After this withdraw the second left-hand finger, which
is _above_ the cotton, and pass it again under that cotton, so as to
draw up the loop. A _half-stitch_ is thus formed, and must be tightened
by being drawn closely to the forefinger and thumb of the left hand. For
the remaining half of the stitch keep the hands in the same position,
but, instead of letting the cotton fall over the thumb, pass this cotton
over the back of the hand; then let the shuttle fall between the second
and third fingers of the left hand, in front, and take it out again at
the back, strain the cotton very tightly, withdraw the second finger
from the loop, letting the cotton which is behind the hand sweep over
the fingers. When this is done, guide with the unoccupied fingers of the
left hand this second half-stitch up to the other, thus completing _one
stitch_.


_The Way to Make a Loop in Tatting._

When a certain number of stitches are made, very tightly draw in the
loop by straining the cotton until the first stitch touches the last,
and thus a loop is formed. During this process the stitches should be
held tightly between the forefinger and thumb.


_The Way to Make a Purl._

A _purl_ is a small loop of cotton often used as an edging in tatting,
as, for instance, round the outer edge of the ovals in tatted insertion
No. 2. The following is the easiest method of making a purl:--The
stitches are not made quite closely together at the place where a purl
is to be made; about one-sixth of an inch is left between each. This
space is left free until the loop is made by uniting the stitches; then
the small piece of cotton in the space bulges out between the stitches,
and forms the purl. If several are required a small space is left
between every two or three stitches, according to the desired number.
Care must be taken in that case that the small pieces of cotton left be
all of the same length, so that the purl may be perfectly even. The purl
can also be made thus: At the same time with the end of thread take the
tatting-pin or a very large darning needle or knitting needle in the
left hand, so that the point may come out farther than the row of
stitches; if then you wish to make a purl, throw the cotton on the pin
before making the stitch; then fasten this stitch, and push it at once
close to the preceding; the pin with the cotton should come above the
stitches. Do not take out the pin before all the purl and all the
stitches are completed and joined together.


_Joining the Work._

Place the tatting-pin in the loop that is to be joined, and with the
hook draw the thread of the loop--that is, round the hand through
it--pass the shuttle through this loop, and draw it up tightly close to
the stitches.

A "straight" or double thread is used to join various parts of the work,
and forms very beautiful patterns. Without the straight thread we
should be unable to imitate point lace patterns, or, indeed, to execute
any designs but those composed of circles, ovals, &c. To use this
straight thread 2 shuttles are required; they should be of different
colours. Sometimes one end of thread is left attached to the reel
instead of using the second shuttle. In commencing a loop the straight
thread is held between the second and third fingers of the left hand,
about 2 or 3 inches from the work; the other shuttle is held as usual in
the right hand, and the stitches and purls worked with it upon the
foundation of the straight thread of the second shuttle.

       *       *       *       *       *


TATTING.


1.--_Pine Pattern Collar in Tatting._

[Illustration: I.--Pine Pattern Collar in Tatting.]

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 80, or
tatting cotton No. 60; tatting-pin No. 3; a small shuttle.

This collar is worked with very fine tatting cotton as follows:--1st
circle: 2 double, 1 purl 7 times, 2 double, draw up the cotton.

2nd circle: 3 double, join it to the last purl of the 1st circle, 1
double, 1 purl 8 times, 2 double, draw the cotton up.

3rd circle: 2 double, join it to the last purl of the 2nd circle, 1
double, join it to the 7th purl of the 2nd circle, 1 double, 1 purl 8
times, 2 double, draw the cotton up.

4th circle: 2 double, join it to the last purl of 3rd circle, 3 double,
1 purl, 1 double 7 times, 1 double, draw the cotton up.

5th circle: 2 double, join it to the last purl of 4th circle, 2 double,
1 purl, 1 double 3 times, draw up the cotton.

6th circle: 2 double, join it to the last purl of the 5th circle, 1
double, join it to the 5th purl of the preceding circle, 1 double, 1
purl 6 times, 1 double, join it to the first purl of the 1st circle, 2
double, draw up the cotton. This completes the star pattern in centre of
pine.

1st circle of pine: 2 double, 1 purl, 1 double 8 times, 2 double, draw
up the cotton.

2nd circle: 3 double, join to the last purl of 1st circle, 1 double,
join it to the 7th purl of 1st circle, 1 double, 1 purl 6 times, 3
double, draw up the cotton and join it to the 3rd purl of centre star.

3rd circle: 3 double, join to the last purl of 2nd circle, 1 double, 1
purl 8 times, 2 double, draw up the cotton and join it on to the centre
purl of 2nd circle in star.

4th circle: 2 double, join to the last purl of 3rd circle, 1 double, 1
purl 5 times, 3 double, 1 purl, 2 double, draw up the cotton and join it
to the 5th purl of 2nd centre circle in star.

5th circle: 2 double, join the cotton to the last purl of 4th circle, 1
double, 1 purl 7 times, 2 double, draw up the cotton, repeat the 5th
circle twice more, then join the cotton to the centre purl of 4th circle
in star.

8th circle: 2 double, join to the last purl of 7th circle, 1 purl,1
double 5 times, 2 double, draw up the cotton and join it to the centre
purl of 5th circle in star.

9th circle: 2 double, join to the last purl of 8th circle, 1 double, 1
purl 6 times, 2 double, draw up the cotton. Repeat the 9th circle 3
times.

13th circle: 3 double, join the cotton to the last purl of the 12th
circle, 1 double, 1 purl 7 times, 4 double, draw up the cotton, turn the
work downwards, and work the

14th circle: 2 double, 1 purl, 3 double, join it to the 1st purl of the
1st circle of pine, 1 double, join it to the 2nd purl of first pine
circle,1 double, 1 purl 6 times, 2 double, draw up the cotton.

15th circle: 3 double, join to the last purl of the 13th circle, 1
double, 1 purl 6 times, 3 double, draw up the cotton.

16th circle: 3 double, join to the last purl of the 15th circle, 1
double, 1 purl 4 times, 3 double, 1 purl, 1 double, draw up the cotton.

17th circle: 1 double, join to the last purl of the 16th circle, 1
double, 1 purl 6 times, 2 double, draw up the cotton.

18th circle: 1 double, join to the last purl of the 17th circle, 1
double, 1 purl 8 times, 1 double, draw up the cotton, and repeat from
commencement until the collar is the required size. The upper part of
the pines is filled in with lace stitches, as clearly shown in our
illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

2.--_Tatted Insertion._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 30, or
Boar's Head crochet cotton No. 12; tatting pin No. 2; large shuttle.

[Illustration: 2.--Tatted Insertion.]

This insertion should be worked with coarse cotton. 5 double *, 1 purl,
2 double, repeat from * 4 times, 1 purl, 5 double, draw up the cotton,
turn the pattern downward, and work another circle the same as that
above described, leaving one-sixth of an inch of cotton between each
circle.

       *       *       *       *       *

3.--_Lace Edging in Tatting._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 10, or
tatting cotton No. 20; tatting-pin No. 3; any sized shuttle. For a finer
edging, No. 18.

1st oval: Fill the shuttle, but do not cut it off from the reel, as a
double thread is used, and commence by working 10 double stitches, 1
purl, 10 double; draw up.

Double thread: Putting the thread attached to the reel round the left
hand, work 8 double, 1 purl, 8 double.

[Illustration: 3.--Lace Edging in Tatting.]

2nd oval: 10 double, join to purl in 1st oval, 10 double; draw up.

The pattern is now complete. Repeat from beginning, taking care that the
next oval be close to the last.

Crochet a heading with the same cotton, working 7 chain, 1 double into
the purl in double thread. Repeat.

       *       *       *       *       *

4.--_Lace Edging in Tatting._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 10, or
tatting cotton No. 20; tatting-pin No. 3; any sized shuttle. For a finer
edging, No. 18.

[Illustration: 4.--Lace Edging in Tatting.]

1st oval: Fill the shuttle, but do not cut it off from the reel, as a
double thread is required, and commence by working 10 double stitches, 1
purl, 10 double stitches, draw up.

2nd oval: Close to last oval, work 10 double, 1 purl, 10 double; draw
up.

Double thread: Putting the thread attached to the reel round the left
hand, work 12 double, 1 purl, 4 double; then join the shuttle-thread to
the purl in 2nd oval, by drawing it through with a pin. Then do another
similar chain of stitches with the double thread, viz., 4 double, 1
purl, 12 double.

3rd oval: 10 double, join to the purl in 2nd oval--the same as that to
which the shuttle-thread has been fastened--10 double; draw up.

4th oval: Close to last oval, work 10 double, join to purl of 1st oval,
10 double, draw up.

The pattern is now complete. Repeat from beginning, taking care that the
next oval be close to the last. Crochet a heading with the same cotton,
working 4 chain, 1 double into the purl of double thread, 6 chain, 1
double into the next purl. Repeat.

       *       *       *       *       *

5.--_Border in Tatting with Crochet Edging._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 60, or
crochet cotton No. 80; tatting-pin No. 2; a bone shuttle.

[Illustration: 5.--Border in Tatting with Crochet Edging.]

Work * 4 double stitches (that is, 4 times following 1 purled stitch and
1 plain), 1 purl, four times following 3 double stitches, 1 purl, 4
double stitches, draw up the cotton so as to form an oval, and for the
smaller oval, work 9 double stitches, but leave, before beginning the
first double stitch, the space of one-sixth of an inch between this oval
and the preceding; repeat from *, leaving the same space between each
oval; join together the larger ovals by the purl.

For the crochet edging, work the 1st row in the following manner:--

1 double (followed by 6 chain) in each of the smaller ovals. The 2nd and
3rd rows are composed of short treble stitches, placed one above the
other, and divided by one chain. While working the short treble stitches
of the 3rd row form the small purl thus:--

* 1 short treble in the first short treble of preceding row, let the
loop slip off from the crochet needle, insert the needle in the under
stitch, from which comes the loop now made into a purl, work 1 double in
the first short treble of preceding row, 1 chain, under which miss 1
stitch, and repeat from *.

       *       *       *       *       *

6.--_Border in Tatting with Crochet._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20, or
tatting cotton No. 40; tatting-pin No. 2. For a coarser size use Boar's
Head cotton No. 4, or tatting cotton No. 20.

[Illustration: 6.--Border in Tatting with Crochet.]

4 double stitches, 1 purl, 4 times following, 3 double stitches, 1 purl,
4 double stitches, draw up the oval, but not quite tight, leave a space
about one-sixth of an inch, leave a similar space between this oval and
the next, work 3 double stitches, fasten them to the nearest purl of
preceding oval, then work twice following 4 double stitches, 1 purl,
then 3 double stitches, 1 purl, 3 double stitches, and draw up the oval

       *       *       *       *       *

7.--_Tatted Insertion._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head crochet cotton No.
18; tatting-pin No. 3.

This strip of insertion is worked with crochet cotton, and consists of
a row of circles, two of which are always joined together, and edged on
either side with chain stitches. Work first * 2 double, 4 purl divided
by 1 double, 1 double, 1 long purl about one-fifth of an inch long, 10
double divided by 1 purl, 1 long purl, 4 times alternately 1 double, 1
purl, then 2 double; join the stitches into a circle; work close to this
a second circle, and knot the end of the cotton together with the cotton
with which the first circle has been begun; repeat from *, but
henceforward in the first of the two circles fasten the cotton on to the
middle purl of the preceding circle, instead of working the middle purl.
When the strip of insertion is sufficiently long, edge it on either side
with a row of chain stitches, by working 1 double in 1 long purl and 5
chain between.

[Illustration: 7.--Tatted Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

8.--_Rosette in Tatting._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40;
tatting-pin No. 3.

This rosette is worked with two cottons, viz., 1 plain, 1 purl, 1 plain,
5 double, 1 purl, 10 double, 1 purl, 1 plain; turn the work downwards,
10 double, fastened on the last purl turned downwards; this forms one
loop turned upwards; turn work downwards, 10 double, 1 purl, 5 double,
fastened on first purl turned downwards; turn figure thus formed
downwards; 4 double, 1 single, repeat 4 times more from *, joining the
figures by means of the purl stitch; the ends of the cotton are knotted
together.

[Illustration: 8.--Rosette in Tatting.]

       *       *       *       *       *

9.--_Star in Tatting._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 50;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 9.--Star in Tatting.]

Fill the shuttle, and commencing a loop, work 1 double, then 1 purl and
1 double 12 times, draw into a round; join the cotton to the 1st purl
loop. 1st oval.--Commence a loop close to the joining, work 7 double,
join to 1st purl of round, work 7 double and draw close; reverse the
work. Join the thread from reel, and holding it out for a straight
thread, commence the scallop:--

5 double, 1 purl, 5 double, reverse the work. The 2nd oval same as
first. Repeat oval and scallop alternately, until the star is completed.

       *       *       *       *       *

10.--_Insertion worked in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 50;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 10.--Insertion worked in Tatting.]

This strip of insertion is worked with two cottons. Work with the cotton
in the left hand over that in the right hand. Both ends of cotton are
fastened together at the beginning by a knot. First work one half of the
insertion the long way in the following manner:--1 plain, 1 purl, 1
plain (the purl must be very short); turn the purl downwards, 6 double,
1 purl, * 6 double, 1 purl, 1 plain, which must all be turned upwards;
then turn the work so that the upper edge is turned downwards; work 6
double, fastened on to the last purl turned downwards (the fastening of
the stitches is made with the thread in the right hand); a loop turned
upwards is thus formed; turn the work downwards, draw the cotton in
right hand underneath that in left hand, and work 6 double, 1 purl, 6
double, all turned upwards; fasten these stitches on 1st purl turned
downwards. In this pattern 1st of border pattern is thus completed;
turn it downwards, 8 double, 1 purl, 8 double, 1 purl, 1 plain, turn
work downwards, 6 double, fastened on last purl of last pattern, turned
up. Repeat from *. When the insertion is of sufficient length, work the
other half in same manner, and fasten it on the 1st half by means of
purl stitches between the 8 double stitches twice repeated.

       *       *       *       *       *

11.--_Tatted Insertion for Trimming Lingeries_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40, or
crochet cotton No. 20; tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 11.--Tatted Insertion.]

This insertion consists of 2 rows of three-branched patterns which lie
opposite each other, and are joined by slanting rows of knots. A
coloured silk ribbon is drawn through these rows which join the
patterns. Each of the 3 branches of 1 pattern consists of 9 double, 1
purl, 9 double, and must be worked close to another. When the 3rd branch
is completed, fasten another piece of cotton on to the middle branch.
Work 12 double over this 2nd piece of cotton, and then work without the
2nd piece of cotton a 2nd three-branched pattern like the 1st.* Fasten
the 2nd piece of cotton on to the middle branch of the just-finished
pattern, work 12 double over it, then again a three-branched pattern;
in this pattern as well as in the following ones, instead of working the
purl of the 1st branch, fasten it on to the purl of the 3rd branch of
the preceding three-branched pattern of the _same_ row, as can be seen
in illustration. Repeat till the strip of insertion is sufficiently
long.

       *       *       *       *       *

12.--_Circle in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 80;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 12.--Circle in Tatting.]

Work first 8 ovals, each composed of 5 double stitches, 3 purl divided
one from the other by 4 double stitches, 5 double stitches; these ovals
are joined together by the purl at the sides, then the circle is
tightened as much as possible, and the cotton with which you are working
is twisted round the ends of cotton that have been cut: the cotton is
then fastened off nearly underneath.

Begin a fresh small oval, composed of 12 double stitches, which should
be fastened to the preceding oval after 3 double stitches (to the purl
in the centre of the first oval), then fasten it again to the purl which
joins together the first and the second oval; leave a space of about
one-fourth of an inch, and work an oval composed of 4 double stitches, 5
purl, followed each by 2 double stitches, 4 double stitches. A very
little farther off make a very small oval, composed of 8 double
stitches, which after the four first double stitches is joined to the
centre purl of the second oval, leaving the same space between as
before, make another oval of 4 double stitches, 5 purl, each followed by
2 double stitches, 4 double stitches; but the first purl is _missed_,
because at this place the oval is joined to the fifth purl of the
corresponding oval; once more leave a space of one-fourth of an inch,
and repeat. At the end of the round the two ends of cotton are tied
tightly together.

       *       *       *       *       *

13.--_Tatted Border with Beads_.

Materials: Black purse silk, or, for white trimming, Messrs. Walter
Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 2; tatting-pin No. 3; 3 hanks of
beads No. 4 to the yard of border.

[Illustration: 13.--Tatted Border with Beads.]

This border, edged with beads No. 4, is worked in middling-size purse
silk over fine silk cord of the same colour as the silk. Before
beginning to work this pattern, thread the beads which take the place of
purl stitches, and which are slipped in between two double stitches.
When the row of stitches is of the length required, form the trefoil
leaves, and sew a few beads over the places where they are joined. These
trefoil leaves are made separately, and then sewn together.

       *       *       *       *       *

14.--_Insertion in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 10;
tatting-pin No. 3; any sized shuttle; for a finer insertion No. 18 or
20.

[Illustration: 14.--Insertion in Tatting.]

1st oval: Fill the shuttle, but do not cut it off from the reel, as a
double thread is used, and commence by working 10 double stitches, 1
purl, 10 double, draw up.

Double thread: Putting the thread attached to
the reel round the left hand, work 8 double, 1 purl, 8 double.

2nd oval: 10 double, join to purl of 1st oval, 10 double, draw up.
Repeat till the length required is worked, then cut off.

For the fresh length, which will make the other half of the insertion,
the shuttle must still be attached to the reel. Commence by working--

1st oval: 10 double, join to the purl which connects the first and
second ovals of the piece already worked, 10 double, draw up. Double
thread: 8 double, 1 purl, 8 double.

2nd oval: 10 double, join to the same purl as last--namely, the one
connecting the first and second ovals of the piece already worked, 10
double, draw up. Repeat, joining the two next ovals to the purl which
connects the two next in the piece already worked, and so on.

Crochet a heading each side, working 7 chain, 1 double into the purl of
double thread, repeat. With a heading on one side only, this makes a
pretty wide edging.

       *       *       *       *       *

15.--_Border in Tatting and Crochet_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40, and
crochet cotton No. 80; tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 15.--Border in Tatting and Crochet.]

This lace is rendered stronger by the crochet rows of scallops and
treble stitch round the edge. Begin with the tatting as follows: Make a
circle of 8 double, 7 purl divided by 2 double, 8 double. This circle is
repeated at a distance of about three-fourths of an inch, only instead
of the 1st purl each following circle must be fastened on to the last
purl of the preceding circle. Then take some crochet cotton, which must
be finer than the cotton used for tatting, and work a row of double
stitches over the thread which joins the circles. The number of stitches
depends on the length and size of the cotton; work double stitches round
the circles at the place where both ends meet. The outer row consists of
treble stitches, which are worked with 1 chain stitch between, missing 1
stitch under each chain. The scallops consist of the two following
rows:--1 double, with which the last and first purl of 2 circles are
joined, 4 chain; in each of the other purl, 1 double, 4 chain, between 2
double stitches.

2nd row: 1 double in each chain stitch scallop, 1 double, 3 long double,
1 double.

       *       *       *       *       *

16 _and_ 17.--_Lady's Veil in Net and Tatting_.

[Illustration: 16.--Lady's Veil in Net and Tatting.]

This veil is slightly gathered in front and fastened to the brim of the
bonnet. It is tied at the back under the chignon. The veil is of black
silk net. The flowrets are tatted with black purse silk, and worked in
appliqué over the tulle. The veil is edged round with a tatted lace made
with the same silk. For the patterns and lace and instructions, see
Nos. 18 and 19. No. 16 shows the way in which the veil is worn upon the
bonnet, and No. 17 shows its shape when stretched out.

       *       *       *       *       *

18 _and_ 19.--_Patterns in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 120 for a
white veil; fine black silk for a black veil; tatting-pin No. 2.

[Illustration: 17.--Shape of Veil.]

[Illustration: 18.--Tatting Pattern for Veil (16).]

[Illustration: 19--Tatting Pattern for Veil (16).]

The patterns Nos. 18 and 19 are meant for ornamenting the veil No. 16.
They are sewn upon the net at regular distances.

For working the pattern No. 18, make with black silk or white cotton 6
times alternately 2 double, 1 purl, at the end 1 purl, then join the
stitch into a circle, *fasten the silk on to the next purl. Then 1 spot
or Josephine knot, consisting of 6 plain stitches, carry the shuttle
downwards through the loop, and draw the stitches close together; repeat
3 times more from *. Fasten the silk on to the next purl, and work a
circle as follows:--8 times 2 double, divided by 1 purl; fasten the silk
on to the next purl, work again 1 spot, after which the silk is
fastened, then work 2 more similar circles divided by 1 spot; they are
fastened on to the last purl of the preceding circle instead of the 1st
purl. Fasten off the silk after the last circle.

For No. 19 work 25 double, divided by 1 purl, join the stitches into a
circle, knot the beginning and the end of the cotton together, cut off
the ends at a short distance. Then work a smaller circle, consisting of
8 double, divided by 1 purl; at the place of the 1st purl fasten the
cotton at a short distance on to the 2nd purl of the large circle. The
ends of this circle are knotted together and cut off in the same way.
Then work a circle consisting of 11 double, fasten the silk on to the
20th purl of the large circle, work 5 double, and join the stitches into
a circle. Then take the ends of the 3 circles, and work close fine
stitches with silk round them, so as to form the stem. The completed
pattern is sewn upon the net.

       *       *       *       *       *

20 _and_ 21.--_Diamond Pattern and Circle in Tatting, for Trimming Linen
Collars, Cuffs, &c_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No 30;
tatting-pin No. 3.

20.--DIAMOND PATTERN.--Work, not far one from the other, four leaves,
each composed of 5 double stitches, 7 rather long purl divided one from
the other by 2 double stitches, 5 double stitches. Instead of making the
1st purl in each of the 3 next leaves, fasten the cotton to the last
leaf of preceding leaf. Fasten off and cut the cotton; begin a fresh
circle by 2 double stitches, 7 purl divided by 2 double stitches, 2 more
double stitches; fasten the cotton to the centre purl of one of the four
leaves, and work a very small circle thus:--2 double stitches, fasten
the cotton to the last purl of the first circle, 3 double stitches, 1
purl, 2 double stitches; fasten the cotton * to the 6th purl of the
leaf; work a larger circle thus:--2 double stitches fastened to the purl
of the small circle, 2 double stitches, 4 purl divided by 2 double
stitches, 2 more double stitches; fasten the cotton not far off to the
second purl of the second leaf; work another small circle similar to
that above-described; fasten the cotton to the third purl of the second
leaf, then to the fourth purl of the same leaf, and repeat from * three
times more, always fastening the first purl of the first circle you are
working (each time you repeat the pattern) to the purl of the last small
circle last worked; fasten off and cut the cotton.

[Illustration: 20.--Diamond in Tatting.]

[Illustration: 21.--Circle in Tatting.]

       *       *       *       *       *

21.--CIRCLE.--Begin it in the centre by working a circle of 8 purl,
rather long, divided one from the other by 2 double stitches. After you
have fastened off and cut the cotton, work * one very small circle
composed of 3 double stitches, 1 long purl, 3 double stitches; fasten
the cotton not far off to the first purl of the circle, and repeat from
* 7 times more, at regular distances. Fasten off and cut the cotton, and
begin * a fresh circle of 2 double stitches, 7 purl divided each by 2
double stitches, 2 more double stitches; fasten the cotton to the purl
of the very small circle, and work, not far off, a circle of 2 double
stitches, 2 purl divided by 2 double stitches, 2 more double stitches;
fasten the cotton to the purl of the next small circle, and repeat from
* 7 times more. Instead of making the first purl of the next large
circle, fasten the cotton to the last purl of the small circle.

       *       *       *       *       *

22.--_Border in Tatting and Crochet_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 20;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 22.--Border in Tatting and Crochet.]

Begin this border with one of the smaller circles consisting of * 3
double, 1 purl, 3 double, 1 purl, 3 double; work a large circle at a
short distance, 5 double, 4 times 1 purl divided by 2 double, 5 double;
close to this circle another as follows:--5 double, fastened on to the
last purl of the preceding circle, 5 times 2 double divided by 1 purl, 1
purl, 5 double; a third circle as follows:--5 double fastened on to the
last purl of the preceding circle, 3 times 2 double divided by 1 purl,
1 purl, 5 double; the cotton is fastened a short distance further on to
the second purl of the first worked small circle, which must be turned
downwards; then turn the work so that the three circles which are joined
together are turned downwards. Work another small circle as follows at
the distance of two-fifths of an inch:--4 double, 1 purl, 4 double,
leave again an interval of about two-fifths of an inch, and repeat from
* till the lace is long enough; but in working the following figures,
consisting of three circles, the 1st circle must be fastened on to the
last purl of the 3rd circle at the place of the 1st purl. Complete the
tatting with the 2 following rows of crochet:--* 1 slip stitch in the
purl of one of the small circles turned upwards, 5 chain, 1 slip stitch
in the next purl, 4 chain; repeat from *. In the following row work 1
double in every stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *

23.--_Insertion in Tatting and Lace Stitch_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 80;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 23.--Insertion in Tatting and Lace Stitch.]

This insertion forms a very pretty standing-up collar when worked with
fine cotton and a coloured ribbon drawn through. It consists of 2 rows
of 3 branched figures turned opposite one another, which are worked
separately and then joined into a row. Work 9 times as follows:--2
double, 1 purl, 2 double, * draw into a circle and * work at a short
distance a 2nd circle as follows:--2 double fastened on to the last purl
of the 1st circle, 8 times 2 double, 1 purl, 2 double, repeat once more
from *, knot together the two ends of the cotton, and fasten them on the
wrong side. One figure is thus completed; each following figure is
fastened on to the preceding one on the middle purl of a circle (see
illustration). When a sufficient number of such figures have been
worked, work a 2nd row of them in the same manner, and fasten from
illustration each middle circle of one figure on to the corresponding
circle of the 1st row. The circles filled with lace stitch are worked
when the 2 rows are completed from illustration in the empty places
between 4 patterns; work first 3 double, fasten them on to a purl on the
side of a leaf turned inside, * 3 double, fasten them on to a purl of
the next leaf, repeat 5 times more from *, work 3 double, join the
stitches into a circle, but not too close, so that the purls keep their
natural position; cut off the cotton, and fasten the two ends on the
wrong side. The lace stitch inside of these circles is worked with fine
crochet cotton; the pattern may be changed for a single or double wheel.

       *       *       *       *       *

24.--_Insertion in Tatting._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 30;
tatting-pin No. 3.

Begin by working separately a sufficient number of small rosettes, each
composed of six ovals of double stitches and purl. These ovals are
worked first in a straight row, then they are joined into a circle and
united in the centre by button-hole stitches. The rosettes are joined
together with fine cotton. The crochet border is then worked on either
side in chain stitches and treble crochet, as seen in illustration.

[Illustration: 24.--Insertion in Tatting.]

       *       *       *       *       *

25.--_Centre of a Tatted Couvrette_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 20, or
crochet cotton No. 1; tatting-pin No. 2.

This illustration shows the centre of a tatted couvrette in full size,
and measuring 12 inches across. Separate rosettes like the pattern may
be joined together with smaller ones, and form a very pretty couvrette.
The pattern is worked in rounds. Begin the rosette with a circle,
consisting of 4 double, 1 purl, 6 double, 1 purl, 6 double, 1 purl, 4
double. Take up another shuttle, and work over the cotton on it, fasten
the end on the last double of the circle and work over it, beginning
close to the circle, 6 plain, 1 circle like the 1st worked with the 1st
shuttle, and which is fastened on the last purl of the 1st circle at the
place of the 1st purl; 6 plain, and continue to work so alternately till
you have 7 circles divided by 6 plain stitches. Draw up very tightly the
cotton over which you work, so that the circles form a rosette, which is
closed by sewing together the two corresponding purl of the first and
last circle. Both the ends of the cotton over which you have worked are
knotted together. For the 2nd round, fasten the cotton on one shuttle on
the middle purl of a circle, work a circle like those of the 1st round,
take up the 2nd shuttle, and work on exactly as in the 1st round, only
work 8 plain between the circles over the cotton on the 2nd shuttle. The
2nd round consists of 15 circles; the cotton with which you work must be
fastened at the required places on the middle purl of a circle of the
preceding round. The 3rd and following rounds are worked in the same
manner; the number of circles must be such as to keep the couvrette
quite flat. In the pattern the 3rd round has 26 circles. Fasten the
cotton well after each round.

[Illustration: 25.--Centre of a Tatted Couvrette.]

       *       *       *       *       *

26.--_Tatted Lace_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 30;
tatting-pin No. 2.


[Illustration: 26.--Tatted Lace.]

This very simple lace consists of scallops which look as if they were
slightly gathered. It must be worked with tatting cotton. Each scallop
consists of 5 plain, 1 purl, 5 plain, then alternately 5 purled
stitches, draw up these stitches till the cotton between the 1st and
last stitch is two-fifths of an inch long, and work a 2nd similar
scallop at a short distance from the 1st. But in the following scallops
fasten each to the last purl of the preceding scallop instead of working
the 1st purl.

       *       *       *       *       *

27.--_Tatted Lace_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 50 or 80;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 27.--Tatted Lace.]

This pretty lace is worked with fine tatting cotton. Work with 2
threads; the knots are worked over the cotton, which is held in the
right hand. Work first the outer scallops of the lace

Fasten both ends of cotton together and make 10 double, divided by 1
purl, turn the work so as to turn the wrong side upwards, fasten the
cotton over which you work on to the last purl, go back over the same
row, miss 1 purl next to the cotton with which you work, 9 double
divided by 1 purl, fastening the cotton over which you work on the next
purl of the 1st row after every double stitch. This forms 1 scallop. *
Turn the work downwards (that is, the purl stitch must be turned
downwards), make 4 times 2 double, 1 purl, 1 purled stitch: this is the
straight row between 2 outer scallops of the lace. Then work a scallop
like the preceding one, fastening it from illustration after the first
row on the middle one of the 9 outer purl of the preceding scallop, with
the cotton over which you work; repeat from * till the lace is long
enough, and fasten the cotton. Knot both ends together again, fasten the
cotton over which you work on the first purl of the first scallop, make
9 double, 1 short purl, 1 double, turn so that the upper edge of the row
is turned downwards, and the scallops upwards, 5 double, fasten the 2
middle purl of the 4 of the next straight row together by drawing the
cotton, with which you are working through the 2nd purl, so as to form a
loop, draw the cotton over which you work through this loop and draw up
the latter; work 5 double, fasten the cotton over which you work on to
the short purl worked after 9 double, turn the work so that the outer
scallops of the lace are turned downwards, 10 double, fasten the cotton
over which you work on the first purl of the next scallop, repeat from
*, and fasten the cotton. After having fastened both ends together
again, turn the work the right side upwards and the outer scallops
upwards also, fasten the cotton over which you work on to the short purl
which is under the first loop; * work 4 times 2 double, 1 purl, 2
double, fasten the cotton over which you work on the purl under the
next loop, and repeat from * till the lace is completed.

       *       *       *       *       *

28.--_Collar in Tatting and Darned Netting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40;
tatting-pin No. 3; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s French embroidery
cotton No. 60; square netting.

[Illustration: 28.--Collar in Tatting and Darned Netting]

The pattern is worked with very fine cotton; the netted grounding over a
mesh measuring two-fifths of an inch round. The collar is ornamented
round the outer edge with a tatted lace. Work a straight strip of
netting for the grounding; begin with 2 stitches, work 18 rows backwards
and forwards, increasing 1 at the end of each row, so that the last row
has 19 holes; work 1 row without increasing; then continue to work with
the same number of stitches, increasing 1 at the end of one row and
decreasing 1 at the end of the other. When the strip is sufficiently
long, work 1 row again without increasing or decreasing, and form
the side by making 18 rows, decreasing 1 stitch at the end of each,
cast off the 2 last stitches on 1 stitch without forming a new stitch on
the needle. Trace the outline of the collar on the grounding with thick
cotton, and begin to darn it from illustration. When the darning is
completed work the tatted lace with the same cotton, as follows:--6
double, 1 short purl, alternately, 3 times 3 double, 1 purl, 6 double,
draw up the stitch so as to form a scallop leaving one-fifth of an inch
between the first and last stitch; work a second scallop at a short
distance from the first, and so on; every scallop is fastened on to the
preceding one after the first 3 double stitches. Work a row of double
overcast stitch between the darned netting and the tatted lace; work
this row over the cotton tracing, marking the outline of the collar on
the grounding and over the cotton between the tatted scallops. Work also
a row of double overcast round the neck part, gathering in the collar a
little if necessary. Cut away the netting on the wrong side close to the
row of overcast stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *

29.--_Mignardise and Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40; fine
mignardise braid.

[Illustration: 29.--Mignardise and Tatting.]

Patterns formed of mignardise and tatting are of quite new style, and
look very pretty. The insertion is easy to work by the following
process:--Make first a circle, as follows: 1 plain stitch, 2 double, 1
purl, 6 double, 1 purl, 2 double, 1 plain; fasten the cotton on to one
side of the mignardise, at the distance of about five-eighths of an
inch, by taking 2 loops of it together; work a second circle at a short
distance from the first, and so on. When the strip of insertion is
sufficiently long, work in the same manner on the other side of the
mignardise. This kind of work is destined to become very popular, and
nothing can be more light and graceful than the union of mignardise and
tatting.

       *       *       *       *       *

30.--_Linen Bag for Cotton_.

Materials: Fine linen, 6 inches square; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
tatting cotton No. 40.

[Illustration: 30.--Linen Bag for Cotton.]

The bag seen in illustration No. 30 is meant to keep the cotton for
working a couvrette; it consists of a round piece, measuring 6 inches
across, which is hemmed all round, and trimmed with a tatted lace. It is
drawn together at top.

       *       *       *       *       *

31.--_Tatting Insertion_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s cotton No. 30.

The insertion shown in illustration No. 31 is composed in two similar
halves. Begin the first in the following way:--10 double, 1 purl, 3
double, 1 purl, 10 double, join the stitches into a circle, and work a
second similar circle at a distance of one-third of an inch; instead of
the 1st purl, draw the cotton through the 2nd purl of the first-worked
circle; leave an interval of one-eighth of an inch, and repeat the two
rounds till the insertion is sufficiently long. Then tat round the
pieces of cotton which join the two rounds, work round the longest 10
double, and round the shortest 4 double, inserting the shuttle
alternately once upwards and once downwards, but for the rest proceeding
as in the common button-hole stitch. When the first half is completed,
work the second in the same way, and fasten it on to the first with the
purl.

[Illustration: 31.--Tatting Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

32.--_Tatting Insertion_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s cotton No. 30.

[Illustration: 32.--Tatting Insertion.]

The pretty effect of the insertion shown in illustration No. 32 is
obtained by means of longer and shorter purl. Work as follows:--Join 9
double into a circle, 1 long purl, 3 double, 1 long purl, 4 double *.
After an interval of five-eighths of an inch, begin the large figure of
the pattern: 2 double, 1 small purl, 2 double, draw the cotton through
the last purl of the small circle, 2 double, drawn through the 1st purl
of the same circle, 2 double, 1 small purl, 2 double, 1 long purl, 2
double, 1 small purl, 2 double, repeat 6 times more from *, and draw up.
After an interval of five-eighths of an inch comes another small circle:
4 double, draw the cotton through the last purl of the large figure, 3
double, draw the cotton through the next long purl of the same figure, 2
double, 1 long purl, 3 double, 1 long purl, 4 double. Repeat the pattern
for the length of insertion required. The threads which join the small
circles are worked over with 7 double in the manner described above,
only the cotton at the principal figure must be left loose the width of
a straw, so as to imitate a long purl. Complete the insertion from
illustration by tatting round the small circles of 16 double on the
other side (but in the contrary direction), form no purl, but draw the
cotton through the long purl of the large figure; the threads which join
the 2 circles are likewise drawn through the middle long purl of the
large figure; this thread is then tatted over with 7 double, like the
opposite outer edge.

       *       *       *       *       *

33.--_Tatted Square or Diamond_.

Materials: If for couvrettes, Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting
cotton No. 20, or crochet cotton No. 4; tatting-pin No. 3. For d'oyleys,
tatting cotton No. 50; tatting-pin No. 2. For headdresses, tatting
cotton No. 80; tatting-pin No. 2.

The square is composed first of nine 4-branched patterns, worked in 3
rows of 3 patterns each, and joined on one to the other with purl. Each
pattern consists of 4 branches close to each other, and each branch
consists of 7 double, 1 purl, 7 double; when the 4 branches of one
pattern are completed, cut off the cotton, and fasten both ends
together so as to form a small circle in the centre. Then work a second
pattern, which is fastened on to the first and second branches of the
first pattern, instead of working the purl stitch; work a third pattern,
which is fastened in the same manner on to the second pattern. Then work
2 more rows exactly the same as can be seen in illustration.

[Illustration: 33.--Tatted Square.]

*For the border of the square, fasten the cotton on the first purl of
the first pattern, work 4 double, 13 purl divided by 2 double, 4 double,
draw up the stitches close, fasten the cotton again on to the same purl
of the first pattern *, and work the following scallop at a short
distance:--4 double fastened on the last purl of the preceding circle,
10 purl divided by 2 double, 4 double, draw up the stitch, leaving an
interval of two-fifths of an inch between the first and the last; fasten
the cotton on to the next purl which joins two patterns, repeat twice
more from *, and continue to repeat from *.

       *       *       *       *       *

34.--_Tatted Rosette_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40, or
crochet cotton No. 60.

[Illustration: 34.--Tatted Rosette.]

This rosette is very pretty for trimming _lingeries_; it is worked with
very fine crochet or tatting cotton. Begin in the centre and work one
circle: 16 times alternately 2 double, 1 purl, then 1 purled stitch.
Fasten the cotton on to the first purl and work the 2nd round: 1 small
circle, consisting of 6 double divided by 1 purl. Fasten the cotton on
to the next purl of the middle circle, and repeat in rounds. 3rd round:
Fasten the cotton on the middle purl of the first circle of the
preceding round, * work at a short distance 8 double divided by 1 purl,
join the stitches into a circle, fasten the cotton at the same distance
on to the middle purl of the next circle of the preceding round, and
repeat in rounds from *, after which the cotton is fastened off.

       *       *       *       *       *

35.--_Rosette in Tatting_.

[Illustration: 35.--Rosette in Tatting.]

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40;
tatting-pin No. 3.

Begin this rosette with the circle in the centre, and work 8 times
alternately 2 double, 1 purl, 1 double, join the stitches into a circle
and fasten the cotton. Take a second shuttle and work over the cotton on
this shuttle; knot the two ends of cotton together * and work 5 plain,
fasten the cotton over which you work on a purl of the circle which is
completed, and which must be turned downwards; 5 plain, 1 purl; repeat 7
times more from *, and fasten the cotton. Work now with one of the
shuttles the small circles on the outside; * fasten the cotton on to a
purl of the second round, and work a circle as follows:--6 double, 1
purl, 6 double, fasten the cotton on to the same purl of the second
round, work a similar circle at a short distance, and a third at the
same distance. Repeat 7 times more from *, and fasten off the cotton
neatly.

       *       *       *       *       *

36.--_Diamond in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40;
tatting-pin No. 2.

[Illustration: 36.--Diamond in Tatting.]

This diamond is suitable for trimming collars, cuffs, &c., when worked
with fine cotton. Work first the four corner patterns separately, as
follows:--7 double, 3 purl divided by 3 double, 6 double, join the
stitches into a circle, work close to this circle a second one
consisting of 6 double fastened on the last purl of the 1st circle, 4
double, 2 purl divided by 4 double, 6 double; then a 3rd circle
consisting of 6 double fastened on the last purl of the preceding
circle, 3 double, 2 purl divided by 3 double, 7 double. Take a second
shuttle, fasten the cotton on the end of the cotton of the 1st circle,
throw the cotton of the 1st shuttle over the fingers of the left hand,
and work with this cotton over the cotton on the other shuttle in the
right hand. Work 5 double, and then one circle as follows with the
cotton in the left hand only:--8 double fastened on the last purl of the
3rd of the 3 circles worked close to each other, 5 double, 1 purl, 5
double, 1 purl, 4 double, 1 purl, 6 double, then again over the cotton
on the other shuttle, 5 double, 4 purl divided by 5 double, 5 double,
then with one shuttle only one circle as follows:--6 double, 1 purl, 4
double, 1 purl, 5 double, 1 purl, 5 double fastened on 1st purl of the
circle worked at the beginning, 8 double; then again with two shuttles 5
double. Fasten the cotton on the piece of cotton before the 5 double
worked with two shuttles, so that the stitches worked over two shuttles
form a circle, and cut off the cotton. When three of these patterns have
been worked, work the centre pattern of the square. It consists of 4
leaves touching each other at the lower points; each leaf is formed of 3
double, 5 purl divided by 3 double, 3 double; each following leaf is
fastened on to the preceding one at the place of the 1st purl. Then work
first 1 round of the oval circles of the square, with which the corner
patterns are joined. Fasten the cotton on one purl of one corner
pattern, make 7 double, 1 purl, 8 double; fasten on the corresponding
purl of another corner pattern, work 8 double, 1 purl, 7 double, join
the stitches into a circle, fasten the cotton on to the same purl to
which the cotton has already been fastened, carry the latter on to the
next purl of the same corner pattern, fasten it, then work three more
circles like the first, which are fastened on to each preceding circle,
at the place of the first purl; fasten the cotton on the two cross purl
of the centre pattern, and work four similar circles on the other side
of the same. The 8 circles which go across the square in the opposite
direction are worked in the same manner. When the square is completed,
draw two threads on each side of each corner pattern on to the other
side of the square along the cotton which joins the circles together.

       *       *       *       *       *

37.--_Tatting for Cap Crown_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 100;
tatting-pin No. 1.

[Illustration: 37.--Tatting for Cap Crown.]

This pattern is very pretty for the crown of a cap like the one
described on page 36, and also for covers, toilet cushions, &c. The size
of the cotton depends upon the use you wish to make of the pattern. The
pattern is worked with fine tatting cotton. It consists of
eight-branched rosettes joined together with small circles. Each rosette
is worked as follows: Work 8 loops or branches close to each other,
consisting of 7 double, 1 purl, 7 double; fasten both ends of the
cotton together, and cut them off. Each of the small circles which joins
the rosettes together consists of 2 double, 8 purl divided by 2 double.
It is easy to see from the illustration how the patterns are joined
together by means of the purl stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *

38 _and_ 39.--_Cap in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 100
tatting-pin No. 1.

[Illustration: 38.--Cap in Tatting.]

This very pretty cap consists of an oval crown in tatting, edged all
round with a tatted lace, the lappets are made in tatting also. The cap
is trimmed with large and small rosettes of narrow blue velvet. A narrow
velvet ribbon is drawn through the straight open-work edge of the lace,
as can be seen in illustration.

[Illustration: 39--Border for Cap No. 38.]

       *       *       *       *       *

No. 39.--Border for Cap.--The upper part of the border consists of 4
rows of circles worked at a distance of three-fifths of an inch from
each other. The circles of the 1st row consist of 3 double, 3 purl
divided by 3 double, 3 double. In the following 3 rows each circle is
fastened on to the cotton, which joins 2 circles in the 1st row, instead
of working the middle purl, the cotton between 2 circles in the last row
must only be two-fifths of an inch long. Then work a certain number of
six-branched rosettes, each branch consisting of 9 double, 1 purl, 9
double. Each rosette is fastened on to every other circle of the

1st row, as can be seen in illustration. The border is completed as
follows:--* 1 double, 6 purl divided by 1 double, 1 purled stitch
fastened on to the middle purl of a circle of the 1st row, 1 plain, 6
purl divided by 1 double, join the stitch into a circle, turn the lace
so that the rosettes are turned upwards, fasten the cotton on to the
purl of the next branch of the next rosette, work 1 double, 7 purl
divided by 1 double, 1 double; fasten the cotton on to the purl of the
next branch, * work 1 double, 8 purl divided by 1 double, 1 double;
fasten the cotton on to the next branch, repeat once more from *, work 1
double, 7 purl divided by 1 double, 1 double, and repeat from * to the
end of the lace.

       *       *       *       *       *

40.--_Lace in Tatting and Crochet_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 50;
tatting-pin No. 2; crochet cotton No. 60.

[Illustration: 40.--Lace in Tatting and Crochet.]

The beauty of this lace depends entirely upon the regularity of the
tatting. The purl stitches must be very regularly made, the circles must
be drawn up tight. Make * 1 circle, consisting of 4 double, 8 purl
divided by 2 double, 4 double; close to this circle a second one; 5
double fastened on the last purl of the preceding circle, 8 times 2
double divided by 1 purl, 1 purl

5 double, close to the 2nd circle a third one similar to the first, but
instead of working the 1st purl fasten it on the last purl of the
preceding circle; leave an interval of about 1-2/5 inch, and repeat from
* till the lace is sufficiently long. The rest is worked in crochet.
Take the fine crochet cotton and work the straight row at the top to
join the patterns together. Crochet 1 double in the 3 first and last
purl of the first and last circle of one pattern, then a sufficient
number of double stitches under the piece of cotton which joins 2
circles. At the place where the circles are drawn together, join the two
pieces of cotton (the beginning and the end) in such a manner that the
top of the lace forms a straight line (see illustration). The 2nd row
consists of 1 treble in every other stitch, 1 chain after every treble.
Then work on the other side of the lace * a row of treble stitches
divided by chain. The treble stitches are worked in the purl stitches of
the circles. Work 1 long treble in the 1st purl left free of the 1st
circle (4th purl of the circle), 3 chain, * 1 treble, 3 chain, 1 treble,
3 chain, 2 treble in the next 2 purl, but cast off the 1st treble only
so far as to keep 2 loops on the needle. When the 2nd treble is
completed cast off all the loops on the needle, 3 chain, 5 treble
divided by 4 chain, 3 chain, 2 treble in the 2 following purl, which are
cast off like those above described, 3 chain, 2 treble divided by 3
chain in the 2 next purl of a pattern, 1 chain, 1 long treble with which
you must join the last purl and the first one of the next pattern, 1
chain; repeat from *. The next row consists of small scallops worked
round the chain stitch scallops of the preceding row; work in each 1
double, 4 treble, 1 double, 1 double in the first and last chain stitch
of every pattern.

       *       *       *       *       *

41.--_Insertion in Tatting and Crochet_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40; crochet
cotton No. 60; tatting-pin No. 2.

[Illustration: 41.--Insertion in Tatting and Crochet.]

Begin the tatting with fine cotton and 2 shuttles. Work with the cotton
on one shuttle over the cotton on the other in the following
manner:--Knot the 2 ends of cotton together * 4 times 2 double divided
by a short purl, 3 long purl divided by 1 double; the 1st and 3rd purl
must be three-fifths of an inch long, the 2nd one two-fifths of an inch;
4 times 2 double divided by a short purl, 1 purl two-fifths of an inch
long; repeat from * till the strip of insertion is sufficiently long.
Then work a similar row of tatting, and join the two rows before working
the 1 long purl, by fastening the cotton on the corresponding long purl
of the 1st row, so that the 2 rows are joined closely together, and the
purl stitches of either are turned outwards. At the top and bottom of
the tatting work the 3 following rows of crochet:--* 1 double in the
middle one of the 3 long purl, 8 chain, 1 double in each of the 3
following long purl, 8 chain; repeat from * to the end of the row. 2nd
row. 8 double in each scallop, miss the 3 double stitches of the
preceding row under 3 chain. The 3rd row consists of treble stitches in
every other stitch, 1 chain after every treble. Lastly, the leaves are
worked with thick cotton by filling up the first and last long purl of a
pattern with darning stitch from illustration; the cross stitches
between the two rows of tatting are worked with very fine cotton.

       *       *       *       *       *

42.--_Purse in Tatting and Beads_.

Materials: Grey purse-silk; steel beads; scarlet glacé silk; a steel
clasp with chain.

This purse is worked in tatting with grey silk and beads. The beads are
threaded on a piece of silk, with which you work over another piece of
the same. Begin each of the second halves of the purse with the circle
in the centre, which consists of 1 purled stitch, 1 purl (all the purl
of this circle are three-tenths of an inch long, and are covered with
six beads, which must be drawn up close together before working the
purl), 12 double divided by 1 purl. Join the stitches into a circle by
knotting together the two ends of the silk.

2nd round: Begin again and work one of the small circles; * 2 double,
draw up one bead after each, 1 double, 1 short purl without beads, 2
double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, fasten the silk on the purl of the
middle circle, so as to let it come between the 3rd and 4th bead of the
6 beads on that purl; 2 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, 1 short
purl, 2 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, join the stitches into a
circle, draw up 2 beads; work a larger circle without fastening the silk
belonging to the smaller one; 3 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, 1
purl with 4 beads, 3 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double; 1 short purl,
3 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, 1 purl with 4 beads, 3 double, 1
bead after each, 1 double; draw up 2 beads close to this large circle
and repeat from *. Each following small circle must be fastened on the
next purl of the circle which forms the centre; they are also fastened
on to each other, instead of working the 1st purl, by fastening the
piece of silk over which you work on the preceding small circle; in the
larger circles, instead of working the 1st purl with 4 beads, the piece
of silk must be fastened on the last purl of the preceding circle, so
that it comes between the 2nd and 3rd beads. At the end of the round,
the ends of the silk are knotted together and fastened off.

[Illustration: 42.--Purse in Tatting and Beads.]

3rd round: * 3 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, 1 short purl, 3
double, 1 bead after each, 1 double fastened on the middle purl of the
1st circle of the preceding round, 3 double, 1 bead after each, 1
double, 1 purl with 2 beads, 3 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double; join
the stitches into a circle, and work at a short distance a 2nd circle; 3
double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, fastened on the last purl of the
just-finished circle of this round, 3 double, 1 bead after each, 1
double fastened on the purl of the preceding round which is between 2
circles; the loop must come between the 2 beads; 3 double, 1 bead after
each; 1 double, 1 purl with 2 beads; 3 double, with 1 bead after each; 1
double; leave a small interval, and repeat 11 times more from *, then
fasten the ends.

When two similar parts have been worked, line them with scarlet glacé
silk; fasten them together round the outside, and sew on the clasp. A
round of large circles edges the purse round the outside. The 1st of
these circles consists of 12 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double, 1 purl
with 2 beads, 4 double, 1 bead after each, 1 double. Work a 2nd circle
at a short distance from the 1st: * 4 double, 1 bead after each, 1
double fastened on the purl of the 1st circle of this round; 7 double, 1
bead after each, 1 double, 1 purl with 2 beads, 4 double, 1 bead after
each, 1 double; leave a short interval, and repeat from * till a
sufficient number of circles have been made. The last purl is not worked
in the last circle.

       *       *       *       *       *

43.--_Insertion in Tatting and Crochet._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40; crochet
cotton No. 60; tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 43.--Insertion in Tatting and Crochet.]

This pattern is composed of leaves and flowers. Each of the six leaves
forming a circle is composed of 4 double, 2 purl, separated by 2 double,
4 double (the first and last purl of each leaf must be joined in the
manner before explained), and the centre of each circle forms a wheel.
The flower has four leaves: each leaf consists of 6 double, II purl,
separated each by 1 double, and again 6 double; each leaf is filled up
with button-hole stitches in fine cotton. To form the circle in the
centre of this flower, turn several times the thread which joins the
leaves, and work button-hole stitches round it. Join the flowers and the
circles by knotting them together, or by making 1 purl longer than the
others, and by drawing the next figure through. The crochet border on
each side of the tatting consists of six rows, which are plainly seen in
the illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

44.--_Border in Tatting and Lace Stitch._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 20 and 40.

[Illustration: 44.--Border in Tatting and Lace Stitch.]

This mixture of tatting and lace stitch is a style of work not only
entirely new, but very pretty and effective when cotton of very
different sizes is used. The tatting is begun with a row of circles
two-thirds of an inch distant from each other; each circle consists of
13 stitches of plain tatting. Fasten a 2nd row to the 1st, and a 3rd to
the 2nd, by working a circle of 13 stitches of plain tatting at
one-third of an inch distance, * then at the same distance; fasten the
cotton on the next circle of the preceding row, work a circle at the
same distance again, and repeat from *. The cotton is fastened on the
circles by drawing it through the circle with a crochet-needle, so as to
form a loop, and then drawing it out of the loop. Take care to keep the
distance between 2 circles always the same. Between the circles of the
3rd row draw another piece of cotton, by fastening the cotton on each
circle of the 3rd row at distances of two-thirds of an inch. Then work
the lower edge of the border in the following way:--1 small spot called
a _Josephine knot_ (for which work 5 stitches of plain tatting, draw the
cotton downwards through the loop which fastens the stitches, and draw
up the whole), fasten the cotton between the next two circles of the 3rd
row, * and a little further make a spot consisting of 8 stitches of
single tatting, close to this a circle formed of 3 double, 9 purl
divided by 2 double, 3 double; then again a spot of 8 stitches of plain
tatting, turn the 2 last spots so as to make their round sides come
opposite one another; fasten the cotton on again between the 2 next
circles of the 3rd row. Then a little further off work 1 small spot (5
stitches of plain tatting), 1 circle of 3 double, 1 purl, 2 double
fastened on the last purl of the preceding circle, 2 double, 5 purl
divided by 2 double, 3 double; then again a small spot (5 plain
stitches), fasten the cotton on again between the next 2 circles of the
3rd row, and repeat from *, always fastening each new circle to the
corresponding purl of the preceding one. On the other long side, the
border is completed by 2 rows of crochet. The 1st row is formed by
working 1 double under the piece of cotton between 2 circles of the 1st
row, with 5 chain stitches between.

2nd row: 1 treble in every other stitch, 1 chain stitch after every
treble. The strip of insertion is then tacked on a piece of cardboard or
oil-cloth, and the lace stitches are worked between the circles, as is
seen in illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

45.--_Tatted Rosette._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 30 for
large rosette, No. 80 for small rosette; tatting-pin No. 3.

This rosette forms a very pretty trimming for lingerie--cravats, caps,
handkerchiefs, &c. The raised pattern in the centre consists of 4
rounds, consisting of 5 circles each, which are sewn together and then
fastened on the rosette. The 5 circles of each round must be worked
close to each other: after working the last circle of each round, knot
the beginning and end of the cotton together. Each circle of the
smallest round has 9 double, the circles of the next round each 15, the
circles of the following one 21, and the circles of the last and largest
round 27 double stitches. When these circles have been sewn on one to
another as in illustration, work a large circle consisting of 4 double,
1 purl, 9 times alternately 5 double, 1 purl, then 1 double. The purls
of this circle are fastened on to the circles of the next round of the
rosette. Fasten the cotton on to the next purl of the middle circle, and
work a circle as follows:--4 double, 1 purl, 4 double, 1 purl, 3 double,
1 purl, 3 double, 1 purl, 4 double, 1 purl, 4 double. Repeat 9 times
more from *, but now, instead of working the 1st purl of every circle,
fasten it on to the last purl of the preceding circle. Then fasten the
cotton. For the last round, which consists of scallops and rounds,
fasten the cotton on to the middle purl of a circle of the preceding
round, and work a circle consisting of 3 times alternately 4 double, 1

[Illustration: 45.--Tatted Rosette.]

purl, then 4 double. Then fasten a second thread on to the same purl on
which the just completed circle has been fastened, and over which all
the scallops are to be worked. Work over it 5 double, fastened on to the
last purl of the preceding circle, 4 double, 1 purl, 4 double, 1 purl, 5
double. Fasten the cotton on to the middle purl of the next circle of
the preceding round, and repeat from * till the round is completed; but
in working these circles, instead of the first purl, fasten them on to
the last purl of the preceding scallop. Lastly, the raised pattern is
sewn on.

       *       *       *       *       *

46.--_Linen Bag for Tatting, &c._

Materials: Fine linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No.
30 or 40; tatting-pin No. 2.

[Illustration: 46.--Linen Bag for Tatting, &c.]

This pretty linen bag is meant to keep tatting and such work from being
soiled before it is completed. The bag is drawn together round the top.
Its size depends upon what you wish to put into it. The original
pattern is 3-3/4 inches deep, and 3 inches wide; it is hemmed round the
top, and trimmed with a narrow tatted lace, consisting of large and
small circles.

       *       *       *       *       *

47.--_Tatted Border._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40;
tatting-pin No. 2.

[Illustration: 47.--Tatted Border.]

Begin this elegant border with 2 rows of tatting, in the following
manner:--

1st row: 2 double, 1 purl, 3 double, 1 purl, 3 double, 1 purl, 2 double;
draw these stitches up into a circle, and repeat the circle at a very
short distance, till the border is long enough; but instead of working
the first purl of each circle, you must join the circle to the preceding
one; the purl on the sides of the circle must therefore be longer than
that in the middle.

For the 2nd row take another shuttle, make a loop on the left side with
the cotton, and work with this end of cotton over the cotton in the
right hand, which is also to be held between the thumb and forefinger of
the left hand. Then work in the following way:--2 double, then 1 circle
consisting of 3 double, 1 purl, 3 double; to form this circle, let the
cotton in the left-hand shuttle fall downwards, and make a loop round
the left hand with the cotton on the shuttle of the right hand. Then
take up again the left-hand shuttle, and join the circle to the middle
purl of the 1st circle of the 1st row by drawing the cotton through the
purl like a loop, and then drawing the cotton in the right hand through
this loop. * 7 double, 1 circle, 7 double, joined to the middle purl of
the next circle of the 1st row; 1 circle, 5 double, 1 circle joined on
the middle purl of the following circle; repeat from *.

The upper edge of the border is worked in 2 crochet rows, in the
following manner:--

1st row: * 2 treble, divided by 1 chain in the 1st circle of the 1st row
of tatting; 2 chain; repeat from *.

2nd row: * 1 treble in the 1st chain of the preceding row, 1 purl (3
chain, 1 slip stitch in the 1st), miss 1 stitch of the preceding row
under it; repeat from *.

       *       *       *       *       *

48.--_Rosette in Embroidery and Tatting._

Materials for trimmings: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton
No. 20; tatting cotton No. 50; tatting-pin No. 3. For couvrettes,
crochet cotton No. 4.

This rosette, joined to other similar ones, forms a very pretty trimming
for articles of fine linen, or even for small couvrettes; if used for
the former, they must be worked with very fine cotton. The centre of the
rosette is formed of an embroidered raised pattern worked in _point de
minute_; round this centre there are small circles worked in button-hole
stitch; the embroidery is worked with knitting cotton, the circles with
crochet cotton. Before beginning the circles, make a circle consisting
of a foundation chain of 80 stitches, in order to be able to fasten the
button-hole stitch; in each of the stitches of the foundation chain work
1 double, then fasten the cotton. In the 2nd round of these circles
fasten the cotton on every 5th stitch of the crochet circle. Work 1
round of open-work treble stitch in the double stitch of the crochet
circle, work in tatting the border of the rosette as follows in 1
round:--* 2 double, 1 purl, 2 double, fastened on to 1 chain stitch
between 2 treble stitch, 2 double; 1 purl, 2 double,; join these
stitches into a circle; turn the work so that the wrong side lies
upwards, and work a second larger circle at a short distance consisting
of 4 double, 5 purl divided by 2 double, 4 double, turn again and repeat
from *. The smaller circles must be fastened after every other treble
stitch; the larger and smaller circles must be fastened above one
another at the place of the 1st purl.

[Illustration: 48.--Rosette in Embroidery and Tatting.]

       *       *       *       *       *

49--_Linen Collar trimmed with Tatting._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co's tatting cotton No. 60;
tatting-pin No. 2.

[Illustration: 49.--Linen Collar trimmed with Tatting.]

The diamond pattern placed in the corner of the collar is commenced in
the centre. For each of the four centre leaves work 6 double stitches, 6
purl divided one from the other by 3 double stitches, then 6 more
double stitches. Fasten off the cotton, cut it, and begin a fresh leaf
by working 2 double stitches, 10 purl divided one from the other by 2
double stitches, then 2 more double stitches. (This small leaf forms one
of the corners of the diamond pattern.) Fasten the cotton to the fourth
purl of one of the four centre leaves, and work another leaf similar to
the preceding. Join this leaf by its two centre purl to the two last
purl of the corner leaf (see illustration). After two more similar
leaves, work one corner leaf, and continue the pattern in the same
manner until you come back to the first corner leaf, then fasten off,
and cut the cotton. Place the diamond pattern upon the point of the
collar, and cut away the material under it; fold back the edges, sew
them neatly, and cover them with the following crochet edging:--Make
alternately 2 chain, 1 purl (the latter composed of 3 chain joined
together by 1 slip stitch). It will be easy to work the circles in
tatting from our illustration; they form an elegant border round the
collar. We shall merely say that the centre circle is always worked
separately, and that the cotton is fastened on afresh to work the eight
outer leaves. The upper edge of this border is worked in crochet. It is
composed of two rows--one formed of chain stitches, and a few slip
stitches worked in the purl of the circles in tatting, the other worked
in open treble crochet.

       *       *       *       *       *

50.--_Cravat in Cambric Muslin and Tatting._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 100;
tatting-pin No. 3.

This cravat consists of a strip of cambric muslin 1 yard long, 6 inches
wide, hemmed on both sides. The ends of the cravat are ornamented with
patterns in tatting, worked with tatting cotton No. 100. A rosette in
tatting is sewn on in the middle of the end of the cravat. The end of
the cravat is pointed, lined on the wrong side with a strip of the same
material as the cravat, and edged with a tatted lace. Begin the rosette
in the centre with a circle worked in the following manner:--1 double, 1
purl, * twice 2 double divided by 1 purl, 1 purl, 3 double, 1 purl,
twice 4 double divided by 1 purl, 1 purl, * 3 double, 1 purl; repeat
from * to * once more, 2 double. At the beginning of the 2nd round
fasten the cotton on the 1st purl of the 1st round, and

[Illustration: 50.--Cravat in Muslin and Tatting.]

work as follows:--* 1 circle consisting of 10 double, 1 purl, 2 double,
1 purl, 10 double; fasten the cotton on to the next purl, 1 circle like
the preceding one, fastened on to the next purl, 1 circle consisting of
9 double, 1 purl, 9 double fastened on to the next purl, 2 circles
consisting each of 7 double, 1 purl, 7 double; between the 2 fasten the
cotton on to the next purl; 2 similar circles fastened also on to the
next purl, 1 circle consisting of 8 double, 1 purl, 8 double, fastened
on to the next circle; repeat once more from *, and fasten off the
cotton. Fasten on the cotton afresh for the 3rd round, worked in the
following manner:--* 1 circle consisting of 6 double, 1 purl, 5 double,
1 purl, 6 times 2 double divided by 1 purl; 1 purl, 5 double, 1 purl, 6
double; fasten the cotton at a short distance on to the 1st purl of the
2nd round, 1 circle worked as follows:--5 double fastened on to the last
purl of the preceding circle of this round, 4 double, 1 purl, 4 times 2
double divided by 1 purl, 1 purl, 4 double, 1 purl, 5 double fastened on
to the next purl of the 2nd circle of the 2nd round; 6 similar circles,
between each of which the cotton is to be fastened on to the nearest
purl of a circle of the 2nd round; repeat once more from *, and knot the
beginning and the end of the cotton together. When completed, the
rosette is sewn on the material of the cravat with button-hole stitches,
taking up one purl with each stitch; the muslin is cut away underneath
the rosette; then work a round of knotted stitches underneath the
button-hole stitch. For the lace, make a row of circles one-fifth of an
inch distant from each other, consisting each of 6 double, 1 purl, 2
double, 1 purl, 4 times 2 double divided by 1 purl, 1 purl, 2 double, 1
purl, 6 double, which are fastened together by the purl of each circle,
and are sewn on the cravat over the cotton between the circles in
overcast stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *

51--_Cravat in Cambric Muslin and Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 100;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 51.--Cravat in Muslin and Tatting.]

The end of this cravat is formed by a long rosette or _médaillon_ in
tatting. This rosette is likewise begun in the centre, and consists of 4
rounds, the 2 first of which are worked like those of the rosette in
illustration 50, with this difference only, that in the 2nd round each
of the circles nearest to the top and to the bottom of the rosette
consists of 8 double, 1 purl, 2 double, 1 purl, 8 double. 3rd round: * 1
circle, consisting of 6 double, 1 purl, 5 double, 1 purl, 6 times 2
double divided by 1 purl, 1 purl, 5 double, 1 purl, 6 double, fastened
on to the next purl of the 2nd circle of the preceding round; 1 circle
as follows:--5 double, the last of which is fastened on to the last purl
of the preceding round, 4 double, 1 purl, twice 2 double divided by 1
purl, 1 purl, 4 double, 1 purl, 5 double fastened on the next purl of
the preceding round; 8 more similar circles, between each of which the
cotton is fastened on to the next purl of the preceding round; repeat
from * once more, fasten the two ends of the cotton together. 4th round:
* Fasten on the cotton afresh with a circle consisting of 7 double, 1
purl, 4 double, 1 purl, 6 times 2 double divided by 1 purl, 1 purl, 4
double, 1 purl, 7 double, fastened on to the middle purl of the 1st
circle of the preceding round; a 2nd circle worked in the same way, only
instead of working the last purl, fasten the cotton on to the last purl
of the preceding circle, then on to the 1st circle of the preceding
round; 10 more similar circles, between each of which the cotton is
fastened on to the middle purl of a circle of the preceding round, and
then on to the 2nd purl of the larger circle at the bottom of the
medallion; repeat once more from *. The pattern is sewn on the cravat
with button-hole stitches, as can be seen in the illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

52.--_Border in Crochet and Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 26.

This border is formed of circles in tatting and crochet leaves, which
are joined together by rows of crochet work; a narrow

[Illustration: 52.--Border in Crochet and Tatting.]

border in tatting forms the lower edge. Omitting this edge, the border
forms a strip of insertion. Each of the rosettes or circles is begun in
the centre; work first 2 double (a double stitch is formed by passing
the thread over the back of the hand, and then passing the shuttle
upwards between the forefinger and second finger, and drawing it up,
then work a stitch of plain tatting; this completes the double stitch,
and whenever so many double stitches are directed it means the 2
stitches), 1 purl, repeat 9 times, join the stitch into a circle, work
at a small distance * a smaller ring consisting of 3 double, 5 purl,
divided each by 2 double stitches, 4 double, draw the cotton through the
purl of the first circle, and repeat 8 times more from *, only each
following circle must be fastened on to a purl of the preceding circle
after 3 double stitches, and having completed each circle the thread
must be drawn through the purl of the first circle, which forms the
centre of the rosette. The beginning and the end of the thread are
knotted together. For the tatted border, make at short distances 1 loop
with 5 double, 1 purl, 5 double; after having worked a sufficient number
of such loops, wind another thread round the thread between the loops,
turning always 1 loop on the right side and 1 on the left. Now begin the
crochet part with the leaves. Make for each of these a foundation chain
of 12 stitches, crochet back over this chain 2 double in the last stitch
but one, 1 double in the next stitch, 1 treble in each of the following
7 chain, 2 treble in the next stitch, 2 treble, 1 long treble, and 2
treble in the next following stitch of the foundation chain. Work on the
other side of the chain the same pattern, only the reverse way; then 3
double in the point of the leaf thus formed, and edge the whole leaf
with a round of double stitches, always working 2 double in each stitch
of the preceding row, and 3 in the long treble stitch. In working this
last round, the circles must be joined to the leaves by taking up the
purl stitch of the circle before casting off the corresponding double
stitch of the leaf; then work the stem which joins the 2 rows of circles
and leaves with a row of chain stitches, on which a row of double is
worked. Then comes the border which forms the upper edge. Make a row of
chain stitches, joining leaves and circles together, then work 3 rows of
treble, work 3 more rows over the tatted border, the first row entirely
in chain stitches, after every fourth stitch take up the purl of the
loops on one side. 2nd row: 1 treble in the middle stitch of the 3
chain, 2 treble, divided by 3 chain. 3rd row: 1 treble, 1 chain, miss 1
under the last. In the last row the leaves and circles must be fastened
on the border, as seen in illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

53.--_Diamond in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 10;
tatting-pin No. 2; any sized shuttle.

[Illustration: 53.--Diamond in Tatting.]

1st oval: Fill the shuttle, but do not cut it off from the reel, as a
double thread is required, and commence by working 5 double stitches, 1
purl, then (3 double, 1 purl 10 times), 5 double, draw up.

Double thread: Putting the thread attached to the reel round the left
hand, work 7 single stitches, taking care to do them tightly.

2nd oval: 4 double, join to the last purl of 1st oval, then (3 double, 1
purl, 5 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches tightly worked.

3rd oval: 4 double, join to last purl of 2nd oval, 3 double, join to
next purl of 2nd oval, then (3 double, 1 purl 5 times) 4 double, draw
up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches.

4th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, 3 double, join to
next purl, then (3 double, 1 purl, 8 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches.

5th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, 3 double, join to
next purl, then (3 double, 1 purl, 5 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches.

6th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, 3 double, join to
next purl, then (3 double, 1 purl, 4 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 7 single stitches.

7th oval: 5 double, join to last purl of last oval, then (3 double, 1
purl, 10 times) 5 double, draw up.

Double thread: 7 single stitches.

8th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, then (3 double, 1
purl, 5 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches.

9th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, 3 double, join to
next purl then (3 double, 1 purl, 5 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches.

10th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, 3 double, join to
next purl, then (3 double, 1 purl, 8 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches.

11th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, 3 double, join to
next purl, then (3 double, 1 purl, 5 times) 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 12 single stitches.

12th oval: 4 double, join to last purl of last oval, 3 double, join to
next purl, then (3 double, 1 purl, 3 times) 3 double, join to 1st purl
of 1st oval, 4 double, draw up.

Double thread: 7 single stitches.

Now cut off both threads, and with a needle fasten off neatly at the
back of first oval by sewing 1 thread over the other.

The diamond is now finished. The centre must be filled up with lacework,
using fine sewing-cotton.

Arranged in groups of 7 or 8, 3 diamonds form a very pretty trimming for
the skirts of silk dresses, the body being trimmed with single diamonds.

       *       *       *       *       *

54.--_Linen Collar trimmed with Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 100,
tatting-pin No. 3; 1 piece of very fine cord.

This collar is ornamented with a triangle and a border of a very
effective pattern. The triangle is begun in the centre, by working for
each of the three leaves 5 double stitches, 5 purl divided one from the
other by 2 double stitches, and 5 more double stitches. When the third
leaf is completed, fasten off and cut the cotton. Now take, instead of
the cotton wound upon the shuttle, a piece of extremely fine cord, over
which work with the cotton from the reel the following row of
stitches:--1 double stitch, fasten the cotton to the centre purl of one
of the three leaves, * 2 double stitches, 5 purl divided one from the
other by 2 double stitches, 3 double stitches, fasten the cotton to the
centre purl of the nearest leaf, 2 double stitches, 9 purl divided one
from the other by 3 double stitches, 2 double stitches fastened to the
same purl as before. Repeat from * twice more, then fasten off, and cut
the cord and the cotton. Begin afresh, and work 3 small circles, each
composed of 12 plain stitches placed quite close together (these form
one of the corners of the triangle), then at small distances one from
the other work 13 similar circles, every second one of which is fastened
to one purl of the row of

[Illustration: 54.--Linen Collar trimmed with Tatting.]

stitches worked over the cord (see illustration). Cut away from the
collar the piece of linen which is to be replaced by the triangle, fold
in the edges and work them round in button-hole stitch, and fill up the
space with the triangle. For the border, work first * one circle
composed of 3 double stitches, 4 purl divided one from the other by 2
double stitches, 3 more double stitches; take up the cord once more and
work over it, 3 double stitches, then, without cord, 1 circle composed
of 2 double stitches, 12 purl divided one from the other by 2 double
stitches, 2 more double stitches; take up the cord again and work over
it 3 double stitches, 4 purl divided each by 2 double stitches, 3 double
stitches. Fasten the cotton to the third purl (reckoning from the last)
of the second circle worked without cord; 3 double stitches fastened to
the fourth purl of the row of stitches worked over the cord (see
illustration), 2 double stitches, 6 purl divided each by 2 double
stitches, 3 double stitches fastened to the purl of next circle, 3
double stitches fastened to the last purl of the row, 2 double stitches,
3 purl divided each by 2 double stitches, 3 double stitches; fasten the
cotton to the sixth purl of the circle (reckoning from the beginning), 4
double stitches. Repeat from *. Work over the top of the border a
crochet edging similar to that round the diamond pattern of collar No.
49. For the point of the border, at the corner of the collar, see
illustration No. 54.

       *       *       *       *       *

55.--_Tatted Collar_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 100;
tatting-pin No. 1.

This collar is worked with very fine tatting cotton. It consists of four
branched tatted patterns and of separate tatted circles, fastened on to
one another as seen in illustration. The four branched patterns are
worked as follow:--3 double, 1 purl, 7 times alternately 2 double, 1
purl, then 3 double, and join the knots into a circle. Work 3 similar
leaves close to this 1st leaf, but instead of working the 1st purl,
fasten them on to the last purl of the preceding leaf; besides this,
instead of

[Illustration: 55.--Tatted Collar.]

working the last purl of the 4th branch, fasten it on to the first purl
of the 1st branch. When 1 such four-branched pattern is completed, knot
both ends of the cotton together and cut them off. Make a row of similar
patterns by joining them on to the 2 middle purl of a branch of the
preceding pattern, instead of working the 2 middle purl of the last
branch (see illustration). Two rows of similar patterns are joined by
the above-mentioned circles, consisting of 32 double stitches, by
fastening these circles from illustration between four branched
patterns. Begin each circle with 2 double stitches, fasten it on to the
corresponding purl of the four-branched pattern, work again 2 double,
fasten on to the next purl, and continue in the same manner till the
circle is sufficiently large. Each circle is ornamented with lace
stitch. The collar is edged round the neck with close button-hole
stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *

56.--_Tatted Collar_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 60;
tatting-pin No. 3.

This collar is commenced at the top, and worked with fine cotton in the
following manner:--1st oval: 2 double, 1 purl, 9 times, draw the cotton
into a circle, 3 double, 1 purl, 1 double, 5 times, 1 purl, 3 double,
draw the cotton into a circle, and join it to the first purl of the
first circle; work two more circles the same as last. 2nd oval: 2
double, 1 purl, 7 times, join the third purl to the third purl of the
centre circle of preceding pattern, 3 double, 1 purl, 3 times, 2 double,
1 purl, draw the cotton up, and work 5 small circles, as follow:--3
double *, 1 purl, 1 double, 4 times, * 1 purl, 3 double, joining each
circle to the purl of the 2nd oval. 3rd oval: 2 double, 1 purl, 8 times,
joining the 3rd purl to the 2nd purl of the centre circle of the
preceding pattern, 3 double, 1 purl, 4 times, 2 double, 1 purl, draw
the cotton up, and work 7 small circles, similar to the small circles
described in 2nd oval.

[Illustration: 56.--Tatted Collar.]

       *       *       *       *       *

57.--_Circle in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co's tatting cotton No. 50;
tatting-pin No. 2.

[Illustration: 57.--Circle in Tatting.]

This circle is worked with fine cotton, and will be very pretty for
ornamenting cravat-ends and different articles of lingerie. It is
commenced in the centre with 2 double, 1 purl, repeated 8 times, draw
the cotton into a ring, and work 8 small circles, as follow:--3 double,
* 1 purl, 1 double, repeat from * 6 times, 1 purl, 3 double, draw up the
cotton, and join it to the purl of centre ring and corresponding circle.
Large circle: 3 double, * 1 purl, 2 double, repeat from * 14 times, 3
double, draw up the cotton, and join it to the 4th purl of small circle.
The centre of ring is filled up with lace stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *

58.--_Tatting Medallion for Trimming Lingeries, &c._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 50 for
cravats and collars, 100 for pocket-handkerchiefs, 20 for petticoats;
tatting-pin No. 2 or 3.


This pattern is suitable for trimming cravats, collars,
pocket-handkerchiefs, petticoats, &c., according to the size of the
cotton with which it is worked. Work first the round of circles which
incloses the leaves, overlapping each other in the centre; begin with
the smallest circle, which is at the top of the pattern; it consists of
3 double, 1 purl, 7 double, 1 purl, 7 double, 1 purl, 3 double. Then
work at a short distance another circle like the preceding one, only
work 8 double instead of 7, and instead of working the first purl,
fasten the circle on to the last purl of the preceding circle; all the
other circles are fastened on to each other in the same manner. The next
circle, worked again at a distance of about one-fifth of an inch, has 4
double; fasten it on to the preceding circle, 9 double, 1 purl, 9
double, 1 purl, 4 double. The following four circles are worked like the
preceding one; only work in the first of these circles 10 double instead
of 9, in the second 11 double, in the third 12 double. The piece of
cotton which joins the circles together must also be somewhat longer
between the larger circles. Then work a circle

[Illustration: 58.--Tatting Medallion.]

as follows: 5 double, fasten the cotton, 13 double, 1 purl, 13 double, 1
purl, 5 double; then a similar circle, but always working 14 double
instead of 13. The next circle consists of 6 double, fasten the cotton,
15 double, 1 purl, 15 double, 1 purl, 6 double; the two following
circles are worked in the same manner, working 16 double instead of 15.
Then comes the largest circle of the round, which consists of 6 double,
17 double, 1 purl, 17 double, 1 purl, 6 double. Work 11 circles more
like the 2nd to 12th of those just described (the 13th circle forms the
middle), only the order of sizes must be reversed, so that the round
closes with the smallest circle. Then fasten both ends of the cotton
together, so that the circles are joined into a circle. Then work round
this row of circles another round, the circles of which must be of
graduated sizes like those of the first round. Fasten the cotton on to
the middle purl of the first small circle of the first round, and work
one circle as follows:--3 double, 1 purl, 6 times alternately 2 double,
1 purl, then 3 double; fasten the cotton on to the middle purl of the
next circle, &c. The remaining circles are worked in the same manner,
only they must be increased and decreased in size gradually like the
circles of the first round; this is done by increasing or decreasing the
number of purl, instead of working the first purl of every following
circle, fasten it on to the last purl of the preceding circle. When the
round is completed, fasten both ends of the cotton together. In the
centre of the oval pattern, fasten 6 five-branched patterns of graduated
size, which are worked in one piece. For the smallest of these patterns
work first three circles, consisting of 5 double, 1 purl, 5 times
alternately 2 double, 1 purl, then again 5 double (these circles must be
close to each other; the second and third circles must, moreover, be
fastened on to the last purl of the preceding circle). The cotton is
then fastened on the first circle between the beginning and the end of
the same, then work close to them two small circles, consisting of 6
double, 1 purl, 6 double, fasten the cotton between the beginning and
the end of the third circle. The other five-branched patterns are worked
in the same manner at intervals of about three-tenths of an inch; but
the separate circles of each pattern must become gradually larger. In
the largest pattern the three large circles consist of 5 double, 1 purl,
8 times alternately 2 double, 1 purl, 5 double; the two smaller circles
consist each of 15 double, 1 purl, 15 double; the size of the other
patterns can easily be worked from this; the cotton which joins these
last together is covered by over-casting with a needle and thread, so as
to imitate double stitches. The five-branched patterns are then fastened
in the oval pattern; they must overlap each other to half way, as seen
in the illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

59.--_Tatted Diamond_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 40, or 80
if required finer; tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 59--Tatted Diamond.]

This pattern is meant to ornament lingerie; it is worked with fine
tatting cotton in the following manner:--Work a * circle consisting of 6
double, 1 purl, 6 double, turn the circle downwards and work at a short
distance another circle consisting of 5 double, 4 purl divided by 2
double, 5 double; at a similar distance a circle of 5 double fastened on
to the last purl of the preceding circle, 2 double, 5 purl divided by 2
double, 5 double; then again a circle consisting of 5 double fastened on
to the last purl of the preceding circle, 2 double, 3 purl divided by 2
double, 5 double: fasten the cotton on to the first circle. Then turn
the work so that the last three circles are turned downwards, leave an
interval of at least three-fourths of an inch, and repeat three times
more from *, fastening the circles on to each other from illustration.
Knot together the beginning and end of the cotton, work button-hole
stitches round the cotton which joins the circles, as shown in
illustration. The purl stitches of the four middle circles of the
diamond are knotted together.

       *       *       *       *       *

60.--_Tatted Cravat End_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 50;
tatting-pin No. 3; 2 shuttles.

This cravat end is given in full size. It is ornamented with a tatted
medallion, edged with lace. The tatting is worked with tatting fine
cotton and two shuttles. Make first the two rosettes which form the
centre of the medallion, then the insertion-like part which edges the
rosettes. The larger rosette is worked as follows:--Knot the cotton of
both shuttles together and work with 1 shuttle only 1 circle consisting
of 10 double, 1 purl one-fifth of an inch long, 10 double; * close to
this circle, which is turned downwards, work over the cotton with the
other shuttle, 1 double, 1 purl, 8 double; this forms one of the
scallops joining two circles. Then turn the work again and work close to
the just completed scallop another circle like the first, but which is
joined to the first circle instead of working the purl. Repeat 4 times
more from *. Then work another scallop and fasten both ends of cotton on
to the cotton over which the first scallop has been worked, at the place
where the scallop is joined to the first circle. The first round of the
rosette is thus completed. Work then the 2nd round over the cotton on
the 2nd shuttle, beginning to work where the two ends of cotton have
been fastened, * 6 double, 1 purl, 5 double, fastened on to the purl of
the next scallop of the preceding round, 5 double, 1 purl, 6 double
fastened on to the cotton between two scallops of the

[Illustration: 60.--Tatted Cravat End.]

preceding round; repeat 5 times more from *. The larger rosette is now
completed. The smaller rosette is worked like the first, only without
the second round. The insertion-like border is worked in two halves as
follows:--The half which touches the edge of the medallion is worked as
follows:--Knot both ends of cotton together and *, work with 1 shuttle
only 1 circle consisting of 8 double, 1 purl one-fifth of an inch long,
8 double; turn the circle downwards and work close to it over the cotton
on the 2nd shuttle 6 double, 1 purl, 6 double; this forms a scallop of
the border. Then turn the work again and work close to the scallop
another circle like the first, but which is fastened on to the first
circle instead of working the purl. Turn the work again, work a scallop
like the preceding one, and repeat 15 times more from *, only the
scallops at the lower edge of the medallion must have a few double
stitches more, as can be seen in illustration. After working the last
scallop fasten the two ends of the cotton on to the 1st circle; then cut
them off. The second inner half is worked like the first; only the
circles are worked without any purl stitch, and fastened on to the
circles of the first half from illustration; the scallops of this half
are somewhat smaller; each consists of 5 double, 1 purl, 5 double. The
completed border is sewn on to the rosettes from illustration; the
different pieces must be first fastened on cardboard. The cotton must be
wound several times round the long threads, as seen in illustration. The
medallion is then sewn into the muslin at the top only; the remaining
border is edged, before joining it to the muslin, with a straight row of
knots to be worked over cotton, and fastened on to each outer scallop of
the border at regular intervals. The number of double stitches between
two purl is different, as distinctly seen in illustration. For the lace
knot both ends of cotton together, * work with one shuttle only 1 circle
consisting of 8 double, 1 purl, 8 double; turn the work and make
another circle consisting of 2 double, 9 times alternately 1 purl, 2
double; then fasten this circle on to the preceding one, where it has
been joined into a circle, so that both circles meet as seen in
illustration. After having turned the work again, work 9 double over the
cotton on the 2nd shuttle, which form a scallop between the circles, and
repeat from *. The lace is then sewn round the edge of the muslin.

       *       *       *       *       *

61.--_Rosette in Tatting and Embroidery_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 60, or No.
40 if desired in a larger size.

[Illustration: 61. Rosette in Tatting and Embroidery.]

This rosette is suitable for ornamenting lingeries, cravats, &c. It is
worked in white embroidery and lace stitch, and edged all round with a
tatted lace. For the latter work with very fine cotton * 1 large circle,
consisting of 5 double, 1 purl, 7 times alternately 2 double, 1 purl,
then 5 double. At a short distance from this circle work a smaller one,
consisting of 5 double fastened on to the last purl of the large circle,
5 double. Leave again an interval as small as the last, and repeat from
* 11 times more. But in working the large circles, instead of working
the 1st purl, fasten them on the same purl of the large circle on which
the small circle has been fastened; besides this, in working the last
(12th) large circle, instead of working the last purl, fasten it on the
1st purl of the 1st circle; the last small circle is fastened on to the
same purl. The lace is thus joined into a circle, and is sewn round the
outside of the rosette with button-hole stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *

62.--_Cravat End in Tatting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 60;
tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 62.--Cravat End in Tatting.]

The illustration shows the end of a tatted cravat. Work first the middle
row of the cravat at the same time with the row of circles on the left
side of the middle row in illustration; begin with the first circle of
the middle row. It consists of 7 times alternately 3 double, 1 small
purl, then 3 double. Work close to this circle, which must be turned
downwards, a Josephine knot, consisting of 5 plain stitches, then a
circle consisting of 5 double, 1 purl one-fifth of an inch long, 5 times
alternately 3 double, 1 small purl; 3 double, 1 long purl, 5 double.
*Turn this circle (which is the first of the side row) downwards, work
close to it a Josephine knot, then a circle consisting of 12 double, 1
small purl, 12 double. Turn this circle downwards, work a Josephine
knot, and then again a circle like the first of the side row, but
instead of working the first long purl, fasten it on to the last purl of
the preceding circle of the same row. Then hold the work so that the
circles of the side row are turned downwards, work a Josephine knot, 1
circle like the first circle of the middle row, turn the work, make 1
Josephine knot, and then a circle like the second circle of the side
row. Repeat from * till the cravat is sufficiently long. The last circle
of the middle row must correspond to the first circle of the same row.
Then begin to work the lower edge at the same time with the last circle
of the middle row, * 1 Josephine knot, then a circle like the circles of
the side row, again 1 Josephine knot, fastened on to the next purl of
the last circle of the middle row; repeat 3 times more from *. Then
continue as before, and work on the right side of the middle row a row
of circles exactly like those which have been worked at the same time
with those of the middle row.

The fastening on of the cotton between two Josephine knots is seen in
illustration. The circles at the other end of the cravat are fastened
like those of the first-described end. The cravat is edged all round
with a row of circles with Josephine knots worked exactly like those of
the preceding row, and the manner of fastening which is seen in the
illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

63.--_Rosette in Tatting and Embroidery_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 60, or 40
if required larger; tatting-pin No. 3.

[Illustration: 63.--Rosette in Tatting and Embroidery.]

The centre of this rosette is worked in lace stitch on muslin, edged
round with button-hole stitch and trimmed with a tatted lace, which is
worked at the same time with the centre. Work first * a small circle
consisting of 5 double, 1 purl, 3 double, fastened on to the button-hole
stitch edging of the rosette, then 3 double, 1 purl, 5 double. Then turn
the just-completed circle downwards, and afterwards work at a short
distance a large circle consisting of 7 double, 6 times alternately 1
purl, 2 double, lastly 1 purl, 7 double, then 1 Josephine knot
consisting of 7 plain. Then turn the work again, so that the last large
circle is turned downwards, and repeat from * 12 times more; the large
and small circles must be fastened on to one another, as seen in
illustration. The fastening of the small circles on to the centre is
likewise done from the illustration.

64.--_Cravat End in Tatting and Darned Netting_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s tatting cotton No. 50;
tatting-pin No. 3; square of netting; fine Mecklenburg thread No. 80.

[Illustration: 64.--Cravat End in Tatting and Darned Netting.]

The end of this cravat is ornamented with a square of darned netting,
edged with a tatted border, and sewn on to the material of the cravat.
But the diamond in tatting (page 18), or the square (page 31) will look
very pretty with this border. The square is worked in diamond netting,
and has seven holes in length and breadth. They are darned in linen
stitch, darning stitch, and _point d'esprit_, with Mecklenburg thread.
The ground is worked over a mesh measuring three-tenths of an inch
round. For each square one more row than is needed must be worked, and
the cast-on stitches are cut off, as they are longer than the stitches
of the other rows. The tatted border is worked with fine tatting cotton.
Fasten the cotton at one corner of the square and work * a circle
consisting of 7 double, 1 purl, then six times alternately 2 double, 1
purl, 7 double, fasten the cotton on to the same stitch of the ground
where it was first fastened; #work a second circle like the
first, but fasten it, instead of working the first purl on to the last
purl of the preceding circle; fasten the cotton again on to the same
stitch, then on to the next stitch, and work a small circle, consisting
of 5 double fastened on to the last purl of the preceding circle, 4
double, 1 purl, 5 double. The cotton is fastened on to the same netted
stitch as before, and then on to the next stitch; repeat twice more from
#, and then repeat from * in all three times more, so that the
square is edged all round. It is sewn into the material from the
illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

65.--_Tatted Antimacassar. (See pages_ 574-5.)

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 30, or
tatting cotton No. 24, or for a larger size tatting cotton No. 20;
tatting-pin No. 1; large shuttle.

The illustration shows the fourth of the antimacassar and the whole of
the rosette which forms the centre. Begin with the latter, with the
five-branched pattern in the centre, at the same time with the following
round of circles:--*Work first one circle of this round, consisting of 3
double, 1 purl, 4 times alternately 2 double, 1 purl, 3 double; then at
a short distance a circle like the one just made, in which, however,
instead of working the first purl, the cotton must be joined on to the
last purl of the preceding circle. Then work at a short distance the
first leaf of the five-branched pattern, which consists of 4 double, 1
purl, 4 double. When this branch is completed, repeat at a short
distance 4 times more from *; but in working the branches of the
five-branched pattern, instead of working the purl, join it on to the
purl of the first branch of the five-branched pattern (this purl forms
the centre of the pattern). All the circles must also be joined one to
each other, as can be seen from illustration. Then work the scallops
round the border of the rosette, * fasten the cotton on to the purl
which joins the two next circles of the preceding round, and work one
scallop consisting of 11 times alternately 2 double, 1 purl, then 2
double. Repeat 9 times more from *. When the rosette is completed, work
eight rosettes in the same manner and join them into a circle from
illustration by means of small three-branched patterns, and then join
them on to the middle rosette.

The strip of insertion which comes next is worked in two halves as
follows:--Work first, for the half turned towards the centre, two rows
of circles lying opposite each other; begin with one of the largest
circles, consisting of 4 double, 1 purl, 3 times alternately 2 double, 1
purl, then 4 double; * at a short distance work a smaller circle of 4
double, 1 purl, 4 double; after another short distance, a circle like
the first joined on to it; then again a smaller circle, which at the
place of the first purl is joined on to the purl of the preceding small
circle. A short distance from this work again one of the larger circles
just described, which is fastened on to the preceding similar circle;
then repeat from * till the double row has nine larger and eight smaller
circles. The first half of the strip of insertion is completed; the
second outer half is worked like the first, only the small circles must
here be worked without any purl, and two of them together must always be
fastened on to the two joined small circles of the first half, as was
done for the five-branched pattern of the rosette; besides this, each of
the large circles has 4 double, 1 purl, 4 times alternately 2 double, 1
purl, then 4 double. When eight similar patterns have been worked, join
them into a circle from illustration by means of small rosettes; this
circle is then joined to the already-finished part of the cover. The
small rosettes and remaining patterns of the antimacassar are easily
worked from illustration. The completed patterns are joined together in
the course of the work.

       *       *       *       *       *

TATTING COTTON

Is supplied by Messrs. Walter Evans and Co., of Derby, in all sizes from
20 to 120. Crochet Cotton, which is preferred by some Tatters, is sold
in all sizes from to 120.

The following table will assist ladies in selecting the size of either
tatting or crochet cotton. All these cottons are on reels containing 100
yards:--

|--------------------------------|-----------------|---------------|
|                                |     Tatting.    |    Crochet.   |
|--------------------------------|-----------------|---------------|
| Petticoat Edgings and          |                 |               |
|    Insertions                  |     20          | 0 and 12      |
|  Night Dress Trimmings         |     40          |       60      |
| Lingerie Trimming              |     50          |       70      |
|  Collars and Cravats           |     50          |       70      |
|  Pocket Handkerchiefs          |    100          |      120      |
|  Parasol Covers                |    100          |      120      |
|  Antimacassars                 |    20, 30       |    0 and 20   |
|  Pincushions                   |     60          |       80      |
|  Caps                          |    100          |      120      |
|  Lace                          |  60, 80, 100    | 80, 100, 120  |
|  Insertions                    |  20, 40, 80     | 40, 80, 100   |
|--------------------------------|-----------------|---------------|

Ladies at a distance from town or on the Continent will be glad to have
some guide as to the quantity of cotton required to complete their work.
The quantity of tatting or crochet cotton used by an average worker is
found to be two yards to the square inch with a single shuttle; three
yards to the square inch with two shuttles.

       *       *       *       *       *




EMBROIDERY


INSTRUCTIONS.


The art of embroidering with cotton on linen, muslin, cambric, piqué,
&c., is very easy to learn by strictly attending to the following
instructions.

The size of the thread and needle must correspond to that of the
material on which you embroider; the needle must not be too long, and
the cotton must be soft. Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery
cotton is the best. Skilful embroiderers never work over anything,
because when you tack the material on paper or cloth each stitch shows,
and if the material is very fine, leaves small holes; but for those that
are learning we should advise them to tack the material to be
embroidered upon a piece of _toile cirée_. If you work without this,
place the material straight over the forefinger of the left hand; the
material must never be held slantways. The three other fingers of the
left hand hold the work; the thumb remains free to give the right
position to each stitch. The work must always, if possible, lie so that
the outline of the pattern is turned towards the person who works. For
the sake of greater clearness one part of the following illustrations is
given in larger size than nature. Preparing the patterns is one of the
most important things in embroidery, for the shape of the patterns is
often spoiled merely because they have not been prepared with sufficient
care.


[Illustration: 66.--Scallop.]

ILLUSTRATION 66 shows how to prepare a scallop. Take thicker cotton than
that with which you work; never commence with a knot, and do not take a
thread longer than sixteen or eighteen inches. The outlines of the
scallops are first traced with short straight stitches. In the corners
particularly the stitches must be short. The space between the outlines
is filled with chain stitches, as can be seen from illustration; they
must not be too long, otherwise the embroidery will look coarse. It is
in this way that every pattern to be worked in button-hole or satin
stitch is to be prepared.


[Illustration: 67.--Double Overcast Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 67 shows the double overcast stitch or button-hole stitch
in a straight line. After having traced the outline begin to work from
left to right; fasten the cotton with a few stitches, hold it with the
thumb of the left hand under the outline, insert the needle downwards
above the outline, draw it out under the same above the cotton which you
hold in the left hand, and draw it up. Repeat for all the stitches in
the same manner; they must be regular and lie close to one another.
Great care should be taken that the material on which you embroider is
not puckered.


[Illustration: 68.--Overcast Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 68 (_Overcast Stitch_).--The double overcast and the
button-hole stitches are worked from left to right, whilst back
stitches, knotted and satin stitches are worked from right to left. The
stitch is worked in the same way as the double overcast, only the needle
must never be drawn out _above_, but _below_, the cotton with which you
work, and which you keep down with the thumb of the left hand.


[Illustration: 69.--Slanting Overcast Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 69.--The slanting overcast stitch is worked without tracing
the outline, always inserting the needle downwards--that is, from top to
bottom. The needle must be inserted in the manner shown in
illustration--that is, not straight, but slanting; insert it a little
farther than the last stitch, and draw it out close to it. The wrong
side of the work must show back stitches. This sort of stitch is used
for the fine outlines in patterns or letter.


[Illustration: 70.--Back Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 70.--This shows the back stitch, the working of which is
well known; it is worked in several rows close to each other.


[Illustration: 71.--Point Croisé.]

[Illustration: 72.--Point Croisé.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 71 & 72 show another kind of back stitch, called _point
croisé_, which is only used on very thin and transparent materials. This
stitch forms on the wrong side a sort of darned pattern, which is seen
by transparence on the right side, and gives the embroidered pattern a
thicker appearance, contrasting with the rest of the work (see the lower
leaves of the flower on illustration 110). For this stitch insert the
needle into the material as for the common back stitch, draw it out
underneath the needle on the opposite outline of the pattern, so as to
form on the wrong side a slanting line. Insert the needle again as for
common back stitch; draw it out slanting at the place marked for the
next stitch on the opposite outline, as shown in illustration 71.


[Illustration: 73--- Knotted Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 73 shows the knotted stitch; the simplest way of working it
is to work two back stitches at a short distance from each other over
the same thread.


The knotted stitch seen in ILLUSTRATION 74 is worked thus:--Take about
four threads of the material on the needle, draw the needle half out,
wind the cotton twice round the point of the needle, hold it tight with
the thumb, draw the needle out carefully and insert it at the place
where the stitch was begun, and draw it out at the place where the next
stitch is to be worked.

[Illustration: 74.--Knotted Stitch.]


[Illustration: 75.--Knotted Stitch]

The knotted stitch seen on ILLUSTRATION 75 is worked in nearly the same
manner as the preceding one. Before drawing the cotton out of the
material hold it tight with the left-hand thumb; leave the needle in the
same position, wind the cotton twice round it, turn the needle from left
to right, so (follow the direction of the arrow) that its point arrives
where the cotton was drawn out (marked by a cross in illustration),
insert the needle there, and draw it out at the place of the next
stitch.


ILLUSTRATIONS 76 & 77.--Raised satin stitch is principally used for
blossoms, flowers, leaves, letters, &c. After having traced the outlines
of the pattern, fill the space left between them with chain stitches in
a direction different from that in which the pattern is to be
embroidered; begin at the point of the leaf, working from right to left,
make short straight stitches, always

[Illustration: 76.--Raised Satin Stitch.]

inserting the needle close above the outline and drawing it out below.
The leaves on the flowers, as well as on the branches, must be begun
from the point, because they thus acquire a better shape. If you wish to
work a leaf divided in the middle, as seen in illustration 77, you must
trace the veining before you fill it with chain stitches, then begin at
one point of the leaf and work first one half and then the other.

[Illustration: 77.--Raised Satin Stitch.]


[Illustration: 78.--Point de Plume.]

ILLUSTRATION 78 shows the so-called _point de plume_ on a scalloped
leaf. It is worked like the satin stitch, only the needle is drawn
through the material in a slanting direction.


[Illustration: 79.--Point de Minute.]

ILLUSTRATION 79 (_Point de Minute_).--This stitch is often used instead
of satin stitch when the patterns must appear raised. Wind the cotton
several times round the point of the needle, which is inserted into the
material half its length (the number of times the cotton is to be wound
round the needle depends on the length of the pattern), hold fast the
windings with the thumb of the left hand, draw the needle and the cotton
through the windings, insert the needle into the material at the same
place, and draw it out at the place where the next stitch is to begin.


[Illustration: 80.--Ladder Stitch.]

[Illustration: 81.--Ladder Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 80 & 81 show the _ladder stitch_, often used in ornamental
embroidery. Trace first the outlines as seen in illustrations; mark also
the cross stitches between the outlines, so that the first touch the
outlines only at both ends. The outlines are embroidered in overcast
stitch or double overcast; the material is cut away underneath the
ladder stitch between the outlines.

We have now shown the different kinds of stitches used in embroidery;
the following illustrations show them used for different patterns.


[Illustration: 82.--Button-hole Stitch Scallop.]

[Illustration: 83.--Button-hole Stitch Scallop.]

[Illustration: 84.--Button-hole Stitch Scallop.]

[Illustration: 85.--Button-hole Stitch Scallop.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 82 TO 85 (_Different Button-hole Stitch Scallops_).--These
scallops are prepared as above described. Take care to have the stitches
even and regular; the scallops must be wide in the centre and very fine
at both ends.


ILLUSTRATIONS 86 & 87 (_Button-holes and Eyelets_).--This kind of
embroidery is used only in round or long patterns. Trace first the
outline of the hole, cut away a small round piece of material, not too
close to the outlines (when the button-hole is very small merely insert
the point of the scissors or a stiletto into the material), fold the
edge of the material back with the needle, and work the hole in overcast
stitch, inserting the needle into the empty place in the centre and
drawing it out under the outline. Some button-holes are worked
separately; sometimes they are in a row; if so, take care to begin to
work each button-hole at the place where it touches the next. In the
following button-holes the outside must be traced double, so as to reach
as far as the next one, but each button-hole is finished at once.
Illustration 86 shows a button-hole worked round in button-hole stitch,
87 an eyelet-hole worked in overcast.

[Illustration: 86.--Button and Eyelet Holes.]

[Illustration: 87.--Button and Eyelet Holes.]


[Illustration: 88.--Shaded Button-hole.]

[Illustration: 89.--Shaded Button-hole.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 88 & 89.--Shaded button-holes are worked like the others,
only they are prepared, as can be seen in illustration 89, so as to mark
the thickness. The stitches must gradually get narrower or wider, and be
worked very close to each other.


[Illustration: 90.--Leaf in Raised Satin Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 90 & 91 (_Two Leaves in Raised Satin Stitch_).--In a leaf
like the one seen in 90 work first the outline and veining in overcast
stitch; work one half of the leaf in satin stitch, and the other half
between the overcast outline and veining in back stitch. The stem of a
leaf is always worked last.

[Illustration: 91.--Leaf in Raised Satin Stitch.]


[Illustration: 92.--Raised Leaf.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 92 & 93 (_Two Leaves in Satin Stitch and Point de
Plume_).--For leaves like the one seen in 93 begin with the veinings,
then work the inner points, then the outer ones, and lastly the raised
spots in the centre. The leaf seen in 92 is worked, one half in _point
de plume_, the other half in back stitch or _point d'or_.

[Illustration: 93.--Raised Leaf.]


[Illustration: 94.--Leaf.]

ILLUSTRATION 94.--- The outline of this leaf is embroidered in overcast
stitch; the open-work veining consists of eyelets; one half of the leaf
is worked in back stitch, the other half in a kind of satin stitch
worked without chain stitches underneath; the stitches are worked
across the leaf, leaving between two stitches an interval as wide as the
stitch itself. The next row is then worked in these intervals, and each
stitch begins half-way up the one before and after it.


[Illustration: 95.--Leaf Raised.]

[Illustration: 96.--Leaf Raised.]

[Illustration: 97.--Raised Leaf.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 95 to 97 (_Leaf in Raised Embroidery).--This kind of
embroidery is particularly beautiful, as it is worked separately and
sewn on the material with an outline in very fine cotton, this produces
the shade seen in 95 (see also illustrations 98 to 113). For such leaves
work first one half in overcast and satin stitch (illustration 96); the
other half is worked on a separate piece of material (see illustration
97); cut away the material along the overcast outline, and fasten it on
the foundation material along the outline which forms the veining on
illustration 96.


[Illustration: 98.--Raised Embroidered Leaf.]

[Illustration: 99.--Half of Leaf (98).]

[Illustration: 100.--Centre of Leaf (98).]

ILLUSTRATIONS 98 TO 100 show a similar leaf; both halves are worked
separately (see 99); the centre is worked in open lace stitch. The
latter (see No. 100) is traced, then make ladder stitches across, work
the outlines in overcast stitch, and cut away the material underneath
the ladder stitch. The cross stitches are then worked in darning stitch
with very fine cotton wherever two threads meet.


[Illustration: 101.--Blossom in Satin Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 101 (_Blossom in Satin Stitch_).--The eyelet is worked in
overcast stitch, then work the upper part of the blossom all in one
piece as far as the beginning of the veining, thence the blossom is
worked in two halves.


[Illustration: 102.--Blossom in Satin Stitch.]

[Illustration: 103.--Bead partly covered.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 102 & 103 (_Blossom in Satin Stitch_).--The raised centre
of this flower is formed by a bead, over which the embroidery is worked.
When the leaves have been worked one after the other, place a bead in
the centre, left free in such a manner that one hole lies on the
material, and work over the bead by inserting the needle into its upper
hole, then underneath the material, drawing it out above the material
close to the bead, and so on (see 103).


[Illustration: 104.--Star in Satin Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 104 (_Star Pattern in Satin Stitch_).--The centre, which
forms a wheel, is worked first. Draw the threads across the circle
marked by an outline; in the centre they are wound round, always taking
one thread _on the needle_ and leaving the next thread _under the
needle_, as can be seen in 122 on the half-finished pattern. The
material underneath the wheel is only cut away when the rest of the
pattern has been embroidered.


[Illustration: 105.--Star in Point de Reprise.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 105 & 106 (_Patterns in Back, Satin, and Ladder
Stitches_).--The small star in the centre of No. 105 is worked in _point
de reprise_.

[Illustration: 106.--Star.]


[Illustration: 107.--Flower in Satin Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 107 (_Flower in Satin Stitch_).--The fine veinings are
worked with fine black silk in _point russe_, which renders the effect
of the flower very beautiful.


[Illustration: 108--Rose in Satin Stitch.]

[Illustration: 109.--Petal for Rose.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 108 & 109 (_Rose in Satin Stitch_).--No. 109 shows one
petal larger than full size. The outer circle only is prepared with
chain stitches underneath, so as to appear raised; the inner circles are
worked flat. The centre of the rose is embroidered in open work.


[Illustration: 110.--Heartsease.]

ILLUSTRATION 110 (_Embroidered Heartsease_).--For the knotted stitch see
No. 75. for the _point croisé_ see 71 and 72.


[Illustration: 111.--Raised Flower]

ILLUSTRATION 111 (_Flower in Raised Satin Stitch_).


[Illustration: 112.--Ear of Corn.]

ILLUSTRATION 112 (_An Ear of Corn in Point de Minute_).


[Illustration: 113.--Bluebell.]

[Illustration: 114.--Inner part of Bluebell.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 113, 114, & 116 (_Bluebell in Raised Satin Stitch_).--This
flower is worked partly in separate pieces, as has been described.
Illustration 116 shows the raised part stretched out flat. When it is
finished it is fastened down along the dotted line on No. 114, which
shows the inner part of the flower.


[Illustration: 115.--Flower.]

ILLUSTRATION 115 (_Flower in Point de Minute_).--This stitch is here
worked over a thick foundation of chain stitches. For raised patterns it
looks very well.

[Illustration: 115.--Outer part of Bluebell.]


[Illustration: 117.--Flower appliquéd on Net.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 116 & 117 (_Flower worked in Appliqué_).--To work in
appliqué, two materials, either similar or different, are needed. You
can work either in appliqué of muslin on muslin, or of muslin on net, or
of net on net. Muslin on Brussels net is the prettiest way of working in
appliqué; we will therefore describe it: the other materials are worked
in the same manner. Trace the pattern on the muslin, fasten the latter
on the net, and trace the outlines of the pattern with very small
stitches work them in overcast stitch with very fine cotton, taking care
not to pucker the material. The veinings are worked in overcast. When
the pattern has been embroidered cut away the muslin round the outlines
with sharp scissors, so that the net forms the grounding (see No. 117).
The greatest care is required in cutting out the muslin to avoid
touching the threads of the net.


[Illustration: 118.--Border.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 118 & 119 (_Narrow Borders_).--It will be easy to work
these borders from the above instructions. Observe only that on border
118 the outer row of scallops is worked first, then the button-hole
stitch row, and the rest afterwards. The spots are edged all round in
knotted stitch. The wheels in the centre of the eyelets of No. 119 are
worked with very fine cotton in loose button-hole stitch; they are wound
round with the cotton in a second row.

[Illustration: 119.--Border.]


[Illustration: 120.--Insertion.]

ILLUSTRATIONS 120 TO 122.--Three strips of insertion, which are worked
nearly like the ladder stitch. For No. 120, in tracing the outlines,
make two small knots at short distances by winding the cotton four times
round the needle, as can be seen in illustration; the windings are held
down with the thumb of the left hand, draw the needle through, and a
knot is formed. The outlines are worked in button-hole stitch only when
all the knots have been made, and then the material is cut away
underneath.

Illustration 121 is a variety of the slanting ladder stitch.

Illustration 122.--The cross threads are worked in two rows in the
common herring-bone stitch, as can be seen by the black lines on the
illustration. The straight lines at the top and at the bottom are worked
in double overcast; lastly, the wheels are worked in a row as described
for the star pattern, No. 104.

[Illustration: 121.--Insertion.]

[Illustration: 122.--Insertion.]

[Illustration: 123. U]

[Illustration: 124. C]

[Illustration: 125. B]

[Illustration: 126. O]

ILLUSTRATIONS 123 To 129 (_Embroidered Initials_).--To learn to work
initials the Roman characters are the easiest to begin with. They must
be traced and prepared like other embroidery in satin stitch, only the
chain stitches underneath must not be too thick: it would take away the
shape of the letters. All depends on the fineness and regularity of the
stitches; they must be worked in overcast stitch. Work from left to
right, and the letter when completed must look rather like raised
printing than like embroidery. Gothic letters are much more difficult to
work on account of the many flourishes; it requires great practice in
needlework to embroider them well. Illustration 123.--The small black
dots are worked in black silk on the thick parts of the letter: the fine
strokes are covered with cross threads of black silk. Illustration
124.--The outlines of the letter and the fine strokes are worked in
black silk. Illustration 125.--This letter is embroidered in raised
satin stitch and _point de plume_. Illustration 126.--This letter is
worked in back stitches, over which are worked at regular distances
cross stitches of black silk. Illustration 127.--Letter in satin and
back stitch. Illustration 128 to be worked in overcast and double
overcast.

Illustration 129.--Letter G in _point russe_ with black silk.

[Illustration: 127.]

[Illustration: 128.]

[Illustration: 129.]

[Illustration: 130.]

ILLUSTRATION 130 (_Embroidered Figures_).--They are worked like the
letters in _point de plume_ and overcast; the dots are worked in knotted
stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *




EMBROIDERY.

[In working the following Embroidery Patterns it will be found advisable
to trace the design clearly upon tracing-paper with a sharp-pointed lead
pencil. The pattern thus traced must be perforated with a fine needle in
a succession of tiny holes, at the rate of about twenty to the inch.
Those ladies who possess a sewing-machine will find no difficulty in
accomplishing this. Several thicknesses of paper can be perforated at
the same time, if required, by any ordinary machine. To transfer the
traced and perforated design to the fabric to be embroidered, it is only
necessary to rub a small quantity of powder blue through the holes.]


131.--_Insertion in Embroidery_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No. 16.

This insertion is worked in raised satin stitch and button-hole stitch.
The outlines must first be traced and the space filled up with chain
stitches. To work a leaf, begin at the point, working from right to
left, making short stitches, and always inserting the needle close above
the outline and drawing it out below. The holes left for the ribbon to
pass through are worked in plain button-hole stitch, the dots are worked
in raised satin stitch.

[Illustration: 131.--Insertion in Embroidery.]

       *       *       *       *       *

132.--_Insertion in Embroidery and Stitching_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton Nos. 10 and
16.

The veinings of this pretty insertion must be worked in overcast stitch
(No. 68, _Embroidery Instructions_), the leaves and flowers in raised
satin stitch, the scallops in button-hole stitch, and the outer edge of
the leaves in back stitch (No. 70, _Embroidery Instructions_) with No.
10 cotton.

[Illustration: 132.--Insertion in Embroidery and Stitching.]

       *       *       *       *       *

133.--_Cravat End in Embroidery_.

Materials: Muslin, cambric, or linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
embroidery cotton No. 24, or fine black China silk.

This graceful design is worked in raised satin stitch (see Nos. 76 and
77, _Embroidery Instructions_) and back stitching, or point Russe. Black
silk may be introduced at will, and the delicate leaves may be stitched
in fine black silk, and the flowers embroidered in white, with the
stamens in black silk.

[Illustration: 133.--Embroidered Pattern for Cravat Ends, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

134.--_Basket Embroidered in Chenille_.

Materials: A basket of fine wicker-work; 1 skein of black chenille, and
3 of blue chenille.

This small round basket measures seven inches across; it has a cover and
two handles. The wicker is very delicately plaited, and is ornamented
with a pattern in chenille which is very easy to work. Upon the cover,
work in point Russe one large star in blue chenille, with the centre and
outer circle in black. All round, work small stars in blue chenille,
with a black stitch in the centre. The position of these stars is shown
in our illustration. The basket requires no mounting; it is not even
lined.

[Illustration: 134.--Basket Embroidered in Chenille.]

       *       *       *       *       *

135.--_Pattern for Collars and Cuffs in Embroidery._

Materials: Muslin, cambric or lawn; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
embroidery cotton perfectionné No. 40.

Work the outer circle in long even scallops (see page 90 of _Embroidery
Instructions_) in raised button-hole stitch; the spray of flowers is
embroidered in raised satin stitch, the leaves in the same, and the
rosebud calyx in tiny eyelet-holes. The centres of the roses are
embroidered in open-work.

[Illustration: 135.--Embroidery Pattern for Collars, Cuffs, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

136.--_Cravat End in Embroidery_.

Materials: Muslin, Brussels net; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
embroidery cotton No. 30.

Tack the traced muslin over the net and work the scallop of the inner
edge; next the design in the centre must be worked in raised satin
stitch (see No. 77 in _Embroidery Instructions_). The raised dots are
also worked in satin stitch (see page 90 of _Embroidery Instructions_).
Lastly, work the outer edging of round scallops and the lines of raised
dots, and with a pair of embroidery scissors carefully cut away the
muslin from the outer edge and from the leaves of the centre pattern.

[Illustration: 136.--Cravat End in Embroidery.]

       *       *       *       *       *

137.--_Embroidery Pattern for Collars, Cuffs, &c_.

Materials: Linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s cotton perfectionné No.
40.

This pretty star should be worked in fine overcast stitch (see No. 68 in
_Embroidery Instructions_). The centre is worked in raised satin stitch
leaves round a circle of button-hole stitch, in the middle of which a
wheel is worked thus:--Slip the cotton under the thick edge and fasten
it, then cross it over and back so as to make 8 bars, then twist the
cotton twice round 1 bar; this will bring it to the centre; work over
and under each of the bars until a thick dot is formed; fasten the
cotton beneath this, and twist it twice round the bar opposite to the
first one you worked, and finish off.

[Illustration: 137.--Embroidery Pattern for Collars, Cuffs, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

138.--_Embroidery Covering for a Quilted Counterpane_.

Materials: Cashmere, cambric muslin, or linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and
Co.'s embroidery cotton No. 4.

[Illustration: 138.--Embroidery Covering for a Quilted Counterpart.]

This is an embroidery-pattern for a woollen or silk quilted counterpane.
Such counterpanes generally have a lining which is turned back on the
right side, and buttoned down at the point of each scallop. The pattern
is a quilted counterpane of scarlet cashmere; the lining is of fine
linen. Before embroidering it, make the points for the corners. The
embroidery is worked in button-hole stitch, overcast, satin, and ladder
stitch. It can also be worked on fine cambric or muslin, and then the
embroidered pattern sewn on the piece of linen which forms the cover on
the wrong side. Make the button-holes as seen on illustration, and sew
on mother-of-pearl or china buttons.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 139.--Embroidery Pattern for Cravat Ends, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

139.--_Embroidery Pattern for Ornamenting Collars, Cuffs, &c_.

Materials: Muslin, cambric, or linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
embroidery cotton No. 40.

This pattern is worked in satin stitch, point Russe, and point d'or on
muslin, cambric, or linen; it is suitable for collars, or cravat ends,
or handkerchief corners.

       *       *       *       *       *

140.--_Handkerchief in Embroidery_

Materials: French cambric; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery
cotton No. 50.

[Illustration: 140.--Handkerchief in Embroidery.]

Three rows of hem-stitching ornament this handkerchief; the pattern
forms an insertion within the outer rows, the flowers are worked in
raised satin stitch, with eyelet-hole centres (see No. 87 of _Embroidery
Instructions_); the tendrils are worked in overcast stitch; three rows
of raised dots, in groups of four, are worked on the inner side of the
last row of hem-stitching. This pattern looks very handsome on a
broad-hemmed handkerchief.

       *       *       *       *       *

141.--_Convolvulus Leaf Insertion_.

Materials: Muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
20.

[Illustration: 141.--Convolvulus Leaf Insertion.]

The convolvulus leaves are worked in raised satin stitch, the veinings
and stems in overcast stitch, the eyelet-holes in slanting overcast
stitch. (See No. 69 of _Embroidery Instructions_.)

       *       *       *       *       *

142.--_Insertion_.

Materials: Muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
20.

This simple insertion is worked in raised satin stitch, the stems alone
excepted; these are embroidered in overcast stitch.

[Illustration: 142.--Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

143 and 144.--_Two Patterns in Embroidery for Trimming Lingerie_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No. 20, and
Mecklenburg thread No. 50.

[Illustration: 143 and 144.--Patterns for Trimming Lingerie.]

These patterns are worked in point Russe and stitching; the spots in
satin and knotted stitch. Illustration 143 is ornamented in the centre
with lace stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *

145 _and_ 146.--_Insertion_.

Materials: Muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
16.

The two insertions, Nos. 145 and 146, are worked partly in satin stitch,
partly in open-work embroidery, and are edged on either side with an
open-work hem.

[Illustration: 145.--Insertion.]

[Illustration: 146.--Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

147.--_Couvrette in Appliqué Embroidery_.

Materials: Net, fine muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery
cotton No. 16.

The pattern must be traced on the muslin, which should be tacked on the
net. The outline of the design must be traced with very small stitches,
and worked in overcast stitches, as are also the veinings; the dots are
worked in raised satin stitch; the border is embroidered with satin
stitch flowers and scallop button-hole stitch. To work appliqué on net,
see No. 117 of _Embroidery Instructions_.

[Illustration: 147.--Couvrette in Appliqué Embroidery.]

       *       *       *       *       *

148.--_Wreath for centre of Pincushion or Toilet Mat_.

Materials for Pincushion: Jaconet muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
embroidery cotton No. 16. For toilet mat: White piqué; cotton No. 12.

[Illustration: 148.--Wreath for centre of Pincushion or Toilet Mat.]

The leaves and flowers are worked in satin stitch; the eyelet-holes and
stems in overcast stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *

149.--_Corner for Handkerchief In Point Russe_.

Materials: French cambric, fine China black sewing-silk, or filoselle.

[Illustration: 149.--Corner for Handkerchief in Point Russe.]

Point Russe stitch is made by a succession of back stitches. These
stitches carefully follow every line of the design, and are worked in
black China sewing-silk or filoselle. The pattern should be repeated at
each corner of the handkerchief.

       *       *       *       *       *

150 _to_ 152.--_Borders and Insertions_.--_White Embroidery_.

Materials: Lawn; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
30, and Mecklenburg thread No. 50; fine black sewing-silk.

[Illustration: 150.--Embroidered Border.]

For the border No. 150, trace first the outlines of the scallop, then
draw the threads which are to form the wheel in each scallop (take for
this fine Mecklenburg thread, for the rest embroidery cotton), fasten
them at the places where they cross each other, and work at these places
small and large spots in satin stitch. Then work the scallops in
button-hole stitch; edge each larger spot with button-hole stitch all
round, and make a row of button-hole stitches for the upper edge of the
border, and above this a row of herring-bone stitches. The material is
cut away underneath the wheels.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 151.--Corner in Embroidery.]

[Illustration: 152.--Corner in Embroidery.]

The corner borders, illustrations 151 and 152, are worked in point
Russe, chain and satin stitch, with fine black sewing silk.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 153--- Cravat End in Embroidery]

153.--_Muslin Cravat_.

Materials: Muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
50; No. 40 for the edges.

This cravat is worked on fine muslin, embroidered upon both ends in
raised satin stitch; the scalloped edge is worked in button-hole stitch;
the bouquet in the centre is worked in appliqué satin stitch--that is,
the leaves of the rose and the foliage are worked separately on muslin;
they are then cut out and worked in appliqué (see Nos. 113 and 116,
_Embroidery Instructions_) upon the cravat, as seen in the illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

154.--_Sandwich Case_.

Materials: Strip of grey kid; strip of oil silk; 1 skein black silk; 1
skein red purse silk; 1 hank steel beads; steel button.

This case will be found very useful on the occasion of a journey or
picnic, as it can be carried in the pocket without any inconvenience.

The case is made of a strip of grey kid, scalloped out at the edges. The
words "Bon appetit," or "Good appetite," at will, are worked over it in
overcast with black purse silk and steel beads, the scroll pattern in
chain stitch with red silk. The back and front of the case are formed of
the same strip, which is lined with oilskin, and to which narrow
side-pieces are added to form the pocket. These pieces are lined and
scalloped out in the same way as the back and front, and then the
scallops of both sides are joined together, and worked round in
button-hole stitch with purse silk.

The case is fastened down with a steel button.

If another colour is preferred, the sandwich case can be made of brown
kid. The scroll pattern should then be worked in rich blue purse silk,
and gold beads used for the letters, which should be embroidered as
before in black silk. The edge may be worked in double overcast stitch
in blue or black silk. A gold button must replace the steel when this
alteration of colour is made.

[Illustration: 154.--Sandwich Case.]

       *       *       *       *       *

155.--_Insertion_.

Materials: Muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
16.

This insertion is worked in raised satin stitch between two rows of
hem-stitching; a small eyelet-hole is worked in the centre of each
flower.

[Illustration: 155.--Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

156.--_Cravat End in Raised Embroidery_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s. embroidery cotton Nos. 50 and
16.

This pattern is a muslin cravat 32 inches long. The greater part of the
embroidered ends is worked in satin stitch; the leaves in the bouquet of
the centre are worked in raised embroidery. (See Nos. 113 and 116,
_Embroidery Instructions_.)

The dotted lines are raised by taking four threads of the muslin on the
needle, draw it half out, wind the cotton twice round the point, holding
it tightly under the thumb, draw the needle out and insert it at the
place where the stitch was begun, and draw it out where the next stitch
is to be worked.

[Illustration: 156.--Cravat End in Raised Embroidery.]

       *       *       *       *       *

157.--_Lady's Purse_.

Materials: Russia leather; blue silk; black purse silk; blue silk
soutache; fine gold braid; and gold thread.

[Illustration: 157.--Lady's Purse.]

This purse is embroidered upon Russia leather; an oval-shaped medallion
is cut out in the centre; a piece of blue silk is gummed on under the
leather so as to show within the oval; both leather and silk are then
lined with calico and stretched upon a small embroidery frame. The front
and back of the purse are made all of one piece, the centre of which is
the bottom; after the embroidery is completed a piece of leather is
added on each side to give the necessary fullness. Four flowrets are
worked over the blue silk, with black purse silk, in raised satin
stitch, with a dot in gold thread for the centre. The stems are black
and the leaflets gold. The inner border round the oval medallion is
worked in gold braid, and the outer one in blue soutache. The network
upon the leather is formed of threads of black purse silk, fastened at
every crossing with a stitch of gold thread; the outer border round this
network is formed entirely of gold braid. On the opposite side of the
purse initials may be worked in black and gold, over the blue silk oval
medallion.

The purse is lined with brown watered silk, and mounted with a clasp of
gilt steel.

       *       *       *       *       *

158.--_Table-Napkin Ring_.

Materials: Crimson cashmere; _toile cirée_; 1 reel each of white, black,
green, blue, and yellow Chinese silk.

[Illustration: 158.--Table-Napkin Ring]

Stretch a strip of cashmere of a bright shade of crimson over a piece of
_toile cirée_, and work the pattern over it in point Russe with fine
silk. The outer borders have white and black outlines, and leaflets of
green silk. The stars have black and blue outlines, a yellow cross and
dots. The figure between the stars is black and yellow.

       *       *       *       *       *

159 _and_ 160.--_Knife Basket_.

Materials: Grey American cloth; red cloth; black jet beads and bugles;
red worsted braid, three-quarters of an inch wide; some strong wire; a
cigar-box.

[Illustration: 159.--Knife Basket.]

This basket is meant for holding dessert knives. It consists of a common
cigar-box nine inches and two-fifths long, five inches and four-fifths
wide, and two inches and one-fifth high, covered inside and out with
grey American cloth, which is ornamented with embroidery worked in
appliqué. The seams are made in overcast stitch. The feet consist of
four pieces of strong wire three inches and two-fifths long. These
pieces of wire are first covered with wool, and then with jet beads;
they are then bent into loops, and fastened on at the bottom of the box
by means of holes bored into it for that purpose. The feet must be
fastened before covering the inside of the box. The inside of the basket
is ornamented with an embroidered pattern in appliqué, which must also
be worked before covering the box. The leaves are made of red cloth, the
stems and veinings of black bugles. No. 160 shows the pattern in full
size; the flowers and leaves are edged with light grey purse silk, over
which small stitches in black silk are fastened at regular intervals.
Inside the box fasten a deal board covered on both sides with American
cloth, so as to divide the basket into two compartments, and fasten on
to this board a handle consisting of a piece of wire seven inches long,
wound round with beads. The basket is ornamented with ruches of red
worsted braid; between two box pleats of the ruche a black bugle is
fastened.

[Illustration: 160.--Knife Basket.]

       *       *       *       *       *

161.--_Satin Stitch Embroidery_.

Materials: Purse silk of two colours, in 4 shades of green and 4 shades
of red or magenta for the flowers, gold twist.

[Illustration: 161.--Fuchsia Spray.]

This branch is embroidered with purse silk of the natural colours of the
flowers and leaves, or in different shades of one colour, on silk
canvas. Fuchsia blossoms are here designed, and should be worked in
raised embroidery; the stamens to be worked in gold twist.

       *       *       *       *       *

162.--_Acacia Spray in Raised Satin Stitch Embroidery_.

Materials: Four shades of green purse silk for the leaves; 1 skein of
brown silk; 3 shades of white or gold silk for the flowers.

[Illustration: 162.--Acacia Spray.]

This spray of acacia is worked in raised satin stitch embroidery; the
flowers should be carefully shaded, and the veinings should be worked
before the leaves are embroidered. The flowers may be worked gold
colour, or imitate the white acacia blossom.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 163.--Tobacco Pouch.]

[Illustration: 164.--Tobacco Pouch.]

163 _and_ 164.--_Tobacco Pouch_.

Materials: Fine crimson cloth; bits of coloured and white cloth for the
pattern; purse silk of various colours; white kid; brass rings; gimp
cord; and silk tassels.

This pouch is cut in four pieces, two of which are given in full size;
the two others must be worked after the same patterns. These patterns
represent the attributes of a lover of tobacco; they are cut out of
cloth and worked in appliqué over crimson cloth.

In No. 163 the outer chain stitch border is green. The knot from which
the different articles are suspended is black, the cigar-case yellow in
cloth appliqué, the cigars brown in satin stitch. The case is crossed by
two rows of chain stitch in blue silk, and edged all round with
button-hole stitch, also blue. The two pipes are of white cloth, edged
round with yellow silk; the shade is imitated by long stitches of grey
silk. The upper part of the pouch is of blue cloth, with a white silk
edging and yellow dots; the under part of brown cloth with a black
edging and a pattern worked in chain stitch with white; the three
tassels are embroidered with black and yellow silk.

In No. 164 the outer border is yellow, the knots black, the small
pattern at the top is of blue cloth edged with yellow; the pipes of
white cloth edged with blue and shaded with grey. The bundle of cigars
is of brown cloth, shaded with black silk stitches, and fastened on with
double rows of chain stitch in yellow silk. The cigar-case is of light
green cloth, edged with white; the Grecian pattern and dots are
embroidered over it with white silk also.

To make up the pouch, cut out the four pieces and join them together by
seams, which are hidden under yellow soutache; cut out also and join
in the same way four pieces of white kid for the lining, and fasten it
on to the crimson cloth at the top only. Sew small brass rings round the
top, and pass a double piece of crimson silk cord through them. Add silk
tassels of various colours at the bottom of the pouch, and at each of
its four corners.

       *       *       *       *       *

165.--_Insertion_

Materials: Linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
16.

[Illustration: 165.--Insertion.]

This strong and simple insertion is useful for petticoat trimmings. It
is worked in button-hole stitch; the stems in overcast stitch; the
circles can be filled up with lace stitches or with wheels, or the
pattern may be worked upon Brussels net and the linen cut away.

       *       *       *       *       *

166.--_Embroidery Pattern for Ornamenting Needlebooks, Workbaskets, &c._

Materials: Coloured purse silk; silk or cashmere; glacé silk; gold
beads.

This pattern is worked in French embroidery and point Russe, with
coloured purse silk on silk or cashmere. The thimble, cotton, and ribbon
are worked in appliqué with glacé silk. The colours are chosen according
to personal taste. The thimble is ornamented with small gold beads. A
bead is placed in the centre of each pair of scissors to imitate the
screw.

[Illustration: 166.--Pattern for Needlebook, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

167.--_Embroidery Pattern for Ornamenting Needlebooks, &c._

Materials: Coloured purse silk; silk or cashmere; beads.

The shuttlecocks are worked in raised satin stitch; the feathers in
point Russe; the battledores in very thickly raised double overcast; the
interior is filled with a netting worked in chain stitch or dotted
stitch; the flowers are worked in satin stitch and beads; the ribbon is
embroidered in appliqué, with a contrasting shade of silk ribbon.

[Illustration: 167.--Pattern for Needlebook, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

168 _and_ 169.--_Travelling Bag_

Materials: 20 inches of Java canvas; single Berlin wool of 2 shades of a
pretty green; 2 shades of bronze colour and white; floss silk--white,
brown, and 2 shades of yellow; purse silk--black, yellow, cerise, blue,
and grey; steel beads; brown silk fancy braid.

[Illustration: 168.--Travelling Bag.]

This pattern is of the ordinary shape of travelling-bags, but it is very
prettily worked. Besides the engraving showing the bag when completed,
the bouquet in the centre in full size is given. This bouquet is also
worked upon the Java canvas. For each petal the white wool is passed
several times from one stitch of the canvas to another till the required
thickness is obtained, then 1 stitch is worked at the point with white
silk. The centres are filled up in point d'or with 2 shades of yellow
silk. The buds are made like the petals, but with 3 stitches of white
silk at the point instead of 1. The leaves are worked in 2 shades of
green wool with 1 stitch of brown silk in the centre; the stems are
embroidered in overcast with light brown wool. The scroll-pattern border
round the bouquet is made with brown fancy braid put on with steel
beads.

[Illustration: 169.--Bouquet for Travelling Bag.]

The remaining space outside this border is worked in coloured purse
silk. The 1st outline of the squares is worked in black silk, by
inserting the needle in and out of the stitches of the canvas. When you
have worked all the square thus, 12 stitches one from the other, work on
either side, at one stitch's distance, the outlines of yellow silk,
which are worked in back stitch, two strips of the Java canvas being
covered by each stitch. Next to the inner yellow outline comes a border
worked over two strips of the canvas, in slanting stitches; this border
is alternately blue in one square and grey in the other. A star is
embroidered in point Russe in the centre of each square; it is grey in
the blue squares and blue in the grey; a steel bead is placed in the
middle of each star. The small crosses between the squares are worked in
cerise. The outer border of the work is composed of a piece of black
soutache, edged with a tiny trefoil pattern in cerise silk. The front
and back pieces of the bag are worked in the same manner. The side
pieces are made of plain Java canvas. The embroidered part measures 14
inches in its widest part, and is 11 inches deep. The bag is lined with
light brown silk, and made up with a steel clasp.

       *       *       *       *       *

170.--_Embroidery Trimming for Muslin Bodices_.

Materials: Fine muslin; fine black silk; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
embroidery cotton No. 24.

This pattern is very easily worked, and looks very nice for a trimming.
It is worked on fine white muslin; the border is worked in button-hole
stitch with white cotton; these scallops are covered with loose
button-hole stitch in black silk. The feather-like branches are worked
likewise in black silk in herring-bone stitch. The white spots are worked
in raised embroidery. The large oval openings through which a narrow
ribbon velvet is drawn are worked round with button-hole stitches:

[Illustration: 170.--Trimming for Bodices.]

       *       *       *       *       *

171, 172, _and_ 173--_Toilet Cushion Cover in White Embroidery_.

This handsome embroidery pattern is to be worked on fine muslin; if
lined with coloured silk or satin it is very effective. The patterns,
which are covered white dots on illustration, are worked in point d'or;
the outlines of these patterns are worked in fine double overcast. The
flower-leaves and wings of birds, which appear raised on illustration on
account of the dark shadows, are worked separately and sewn on at the
corresponding places. No. 172 shows the wing of a bird, No. 173 a
rose-leaf somewhat increased in size; the former is worked entirely in
button-hole stitch, or trimmed with a ruche of coloured ribbon. This
pattern may also be worked on glacé silk with purse silk.

[Illustration: 171.--Toilet Cushion Cover in White Embroidery.]

[Illustration: 172.--Wing of Bird.]

[Illustration: 173.--Rose Leaf.]

[Illustration: 174.--Pattern for Glove Box.]

       *       *       *       *       *

174 _and_ 175.--_Glove Box_.

Materials: 15 inches of French blue cashmere; silks of various colours.
A shape in bamboo cane, painted brown and varnished.

[Illustration: 175.--Glove Box.]

The ornamentation of this box is both novel and tasteful. It is
embroidered in coloured silks, upon light blue cashmere. Part of the
embroidery pattern is given in full size. All the outlines are worked in
overcast, the stitches being made rather long and slanting, and the
small leaves are each composed of one stitch, as in point Russe. The
leaves are alternately red and yellow upon a green stem; the scalloped
outline which has no leaves is red. The pine patterns are worked in
satin stitch--the centre one is green, edged with red; the side ones are
pink, edged with red; the small wing-like figures are black, edged with
maize; the diamond, maize, edged with black, with an outer rim of maize.
In the round pattern the centre is pink; the edge red, with red and
yellow leaves; the 3 outer circles are successively white, green, and
red; at the top the centre branch is yellow, the leaves red and yellow,
the side ones are green, with the leaves pink and green.

The strip of embroidered cashmere is lined with blue silk, slipped
through the bamboo-canes of the mounting, and joined together at the
side by a seam. The cover is lined with plain blue cashmere, upon which
initials might be embroidered at discretion. The four corners are
ornamented with pretty silk tassels, of colours to match with the
embroidery. To fasten the box, sew on a blue ribbon to the cover, and
one to the box.

       *       *       *       *       *

176 _and_ 177.--_Hanging Letter Case_.

Materials: Crimson velvet; white satin beads; gold soutache; and fine
gold bouillon.

No. 176 shows the letter case when completed in a reduced size, No. 177
the principal part of the embroidered pattern in full size.

The letter case is composed of two parts. The larger part is 11 inches
long, 8 inches wide; it is ornamented on the upper part with a pattern
in gold soutache, and the word LETTERS or LETTRES embroidered in gold
bouillon; underneath there is a pattern embroidered in oval white satin
beads, edged round with fine white chenille; the scroll pattern is
embroidered in gold bouillon.

The second part is placed over the lower part of the first, and forms
the pocket which contains the letters. The centre flower is composed of
11 oval beads, edged round with white chenille; another white bead is
placed in the centre, and edged with gold bouillon. The other flowers
are also composed of white satin beads, edged with gold bouillon.

[Illustration: 176.--Hanging Letter Case.]

[Illustration: 177.--Pattern for Embroidered Letter Case.]

       *       *       *       *       *

178.--_Embroidered Edging_.

Materials: Muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No.
24

[Illustration: 178.--Embroidered Edging.]

This edging is worked in broderie Anglaise or overcast stitch; the edge
in scallop button-hole stitch; the ovals and dots in raised satin
stitch. The stems are worked in slanting overcast stitch (No. 122,
_Embroidery Instructions_).

       *       *       *       *       *

179.--_Border in Oriental Embroidery_.

Materials: Purse silk of the following shades:--dark red, bright red, 2
shades of green, 2 of blue, 2 of yellow violet.


[Illustration: 179.--Border in Oriental Embroidery.]

The four ovals placed together are worked of four contrasting colours.
These ovals are composed of two rows of chain stitch. The outer row of
the first oval is dark red, and the inner one bright red. Following the
same arrangement, the second oval is of two shades of green; the third
of two shades of blue; and the fourth of two shades of yellow. The
knotted stitch in the centre is violet. The dots outside the ovals are
worked in satin stitch, and are alternately red, yellow, violet, and
blue. The stems are long stitches of black silk. The arabesque patterns
between those formed of four ovals are worked in chain stitch with silk
of two shades of brown. The colours of the ovals may be varied as much
as you please, but the brown shades of the arabesque patterns should
remain the same for the whole of the border.

       *       *       *       *       *

180 _and_ 181.--_Embroidery Stars_.

Materials: Fine linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton
No. 40.

These stars are designed for medallions, to be worked on linen collars
and cuffs. No. 180 is worked in successive rows of back-stitching, round
an open wheel; ladder stitch (see No. 81, _Embroidery Instructions_) is
worked round this, and a raised scallop in button-hole stitch forms the
edge.

[Illustration: 180.--Embroidery Star.]

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 181.--Embroidery Star.]

No. 181 is worked in raised satin stitch; the interior of the star is
filled with lace wheels.

       *       *       *       *       *

182 _and_ 183.--_Key Bag_.

Materials: Grey kid; grey silk; steel-coloured glacé silk; purse silk of
5 shades of blue-green, 4 shades of brown, and silver-grey, scarlet, and
white; grey silk cord; grey glacé silk ribbon.

This bag is made of grey kid, and lined with grey silk. The embroidery
imitates on one side a key formed of poppies, leaves, and stems, in the
upper part of which sits an owl, "the

[Illustration: 182.--Key Bag.]

[Illustration: 183.--Key Bag.]

bird of night." The poppies are worked with blue-green purse silk in 5
shades; the plumage of the owl is worked with brown silk of 4 shades in
satin stitch, the colours blending one into the other, as can be clearly
seen in illustration No. 182. The eyes of the owl are embroidered in
scarlet and white silk. Illustration No. 183 shows the other side of the
bag, which is ornamented with steel-coloured silk appliqué figures, in
the form of a Gothic lock. They are edged with fine grey silk cord. The
screws of the lock are imitated in satin stitch embroidery with
silver-grey silk. After having lined each part, join the two halves of
the bag with a border of grey glacé silk ribbon, which must, of course,
continue round the revers. The bag is fastened by means of a loop and
steel button.

       *       *       *       *       *

184 _and_ 185--- _Embroidery Patterns for Trimming Cravats, Bodices,
Morning Caps, &c._

[Illustration: 184--Embroidery Pattern for Cravats, &c.]

Materials: Muslin or cambric; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s No. 24 for
lingerie, No. 12 for couvrettes.

These patterns, worked on muslin or cambric, are suitable for trimming
various articles of lingerie; joined on to other squares they make
pretty covers. They can also be embroidered with coloured silk, wool, or
thread, on cloth, rep, or cashmere, for trimming couvrettes and toilet
pincushions. The patterns should be embroidered in satin stitch and
edged with chain stitch; they can also be worked in button-hole stitch.
When the pattern is worked on woollen material this material must be cut
away inside the leaves and spots.

[Illustration: 185.--Embroidery Pattern for Cravats, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

186 _and_ 187.--_Pen-Wiper in Cloth Appliqué_.

Materials: 4 circles of black cloth; 1 large white, 4 small white, and 4
red circles of cloth; 4 white and 4 red stars of cloth; small black
beads; gold and black purse silk; small ivory handle or figure.

This pretty little pen-wiper is covered with small circles of cloth. No.
187 is one of these circles seen in full size. There are 4 white and 4
red ones, and they are pinked out round the edge. In the centre of each
red circle place a white, and in the centre of each white circle a red
star, and work a cross over it with small round black beads. The
border, in herring-bone stitch, is worked with gold-coloured purse silk
on the red, and with black on the white cloth. The centre of the
pen-wiper is covered with a circle of white cloth larger than the side
ones, worked in point Russe and point Mexico in black silk. When all the
circles are prepared, sew them neatly on to a round piece of red cloth,
placing alternately 1 white and 1 red, so as to overlap one another, and
between each a circle of black cloth, also pinked out round the edge.
The work is then fastened upon a round of cardboard lined with black
glazed calico, and a

[Illustration: 186.--Pen-wiper in Embroidery.]

small handle of carved ivory, or an ivory figure, is fixed in the
centre. The circles of black cloth are used to wipe the pens.

[Illustration: 187.--Full-sized Circle for Pen-wiper.]

       *       *       *       *       *

188.--_Insertion_.

Materials: Fine muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton
No. 30.

[Illustration: 188.--Insertion.]

The flowers of this insertion are embroidered in raised satin stitch
round an open eyelet hole, worked in overcast stitch the stars are
worked in point Russe stitch; the four eyelet holes which surround each
flower, in overcast stitch; and the edge is finished with a row of
hem-stitching on each side.

       *       *       *       *       *

189.--_Insertion_.

Materials: Fine muslin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton
No. 24.

This insertion is entirely embroidered in raised satin stitch; the dots
and stems should be worked first, and the leaves afterwards. It is edged
on both sides with a row of hem-stitching.

[Illustration: 189.--Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

190.--_Cigar Case_.

Materials: Russia leather; fine silk cord; black purse silk; gold
thread.

The material of this cigar case should be finely-embossed light brown
Russia leather; the centre pattern to be embroidered in well-raised
satin stitch with black purse silk. All the lighter outlines shown in
the illustration are worked in gold thread. The border to be worked in
fine silk cord of the same colour as the leather, with a network of
black purse silk, stitched with gold at all the crossings. On the
opposite side of the cigar case

[Illustration: 190--Cigar Case.]

initials may be worked. The lining of light brown watered silk, or fine
leather, and the mountings gilt or steel.

       *       *       *       *       *

191.--_Wicker Waste Paper Basket_.

Materials: Basket and stand; coloured Berlin wools; cloth fringe; and
glazed calico.

[Illustration: 191.--Waste Paper Basket.]

The basket may be of any size, but of the shape of the pattern. It rests
upon two brass hooks fastened upon a stand. This stand can be made by
any joiner, and should match the furniture of the room. The trimming
consists of an embroidered border, lined with glazed calico, and put on
round the edge; the lower part of the border is trimmed with a woollen
fringe. The shades selected should correspond with the prevailing
colour of the room.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 192.--Insertion.]

192.--_Insertion_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No. 16.

The edge of this insertion is worked in raised button-hole stitch, and
embroidered in sharply-pointed scallops; the dotted line is worked in
raised satin stitch, as are also the flowers which compose the centre
wreath; the eyelet holes are worked in overcast stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 193.--Embroidered Linen Collar.]

193 _and_ 194.--_Embroidered Linen Collars_.

Materials: Double linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery
cotton No. 40.

These patterns are to be worked on linen taken double. No. 194 is
worked in button-hole, satin, and knotted stitch (see Nos. 81, 82, 76,
and 73 of _Embroidery Instructions_), and point d'or with white cotton,
and point Russe with black silk. No. 193 is worked entirely with white
cotton in button-hole, satin, knotted ladder, and overcast stitch. (See
Nos. 82, 76, 73, 81, and 68 of _Embroidery Instructions_.)

[Illustration: 194.--Embroidered Linen Collar.]

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 195--What-not in the Shape of a Hammock.]

195 _and_ 196.--_What-not_.

Materials: Fine canvas; 3 shades of violet floss silk; 4 shades of green
floss silk; sea-green wool, or floss silk; 1 skein of yellow floss silk;
green chenille; cord and tassels.

[Illustration: 196.--Pattern for What-not (full size).]

This small what-not or jewel-stand is very elegant. It is meant to place
upon the toilet-table. No. 195 shows the hammock when completed, No. 196
one-half of the embroidery pattern in full size; it is worked upon fine
canvas. The violets are in floss silk of three shades of violet, with
a raised spot worked in yellow silk in the centre, the leaves are worked
in Berlin wool of various shades of green, and the stems in overcast of
a light green shade. The pattern is grounded in tent stitch with
sea-green silk. The hammock is composed of two sides and an under-piece
cut out in cardboard, covered with the embroidered canvas outside, lined
and quilted with plain green silk inside. It is edged round the top with
green chenille. The mounting is composed of bamboo-canes; the hammock is
fastened on to it with green silk cord, finished off with tassels.

       *       *       *       *       *

197.--_Embroidered Handkerchief_.

Materials: Grass lawn or French cambric; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
embroidery cotton No. 40.

This embroidery pattern is worked between the borders of a handkerchief,
which may be either of French cambric or grass lawn. The design is
simple, but effective, and very easy to work. If worked on fine French
cambric, the handkerchief should be lightly tacked upon _toile cirée_.
The rows of raised dots should be worked first, and then the graceful
branches of pointed leaves in satin stitch. The plain round dots might
be worked in bright red marking cotton in either of the patterns. To
produce a good effect, rather fine cotton must be selected, and No. 40
will be found very effective on either lawn or cambric. For mourning
wear, this pattern should be embroidered with black filoselle, or the
leaves can be worked in white cotton, and the dots in filoselle.

[Illustration: 197.--Handkerchief Border.]

       *       *       *       *       *

198 _and_ 199.--_Two Medallions for a Purse in Embroidery_.

Materials: Light brown russia leather; black, scarlet, and gold silk;
steel or gold clasp.

These medallions are intended to ornament a small purse, but may be
employed on a variety of articles.

[Illustration: 198.--Medallion for a Purse in Embroidery.]

[Illustration: 199.--Medallion for a Purse in Embroidery.]

The raised spots of No. 198 should be worked in black silk, in satin
stitch, the branched sprays in point Russe in scarlet and gold, the four
largest being in scarlet and the intermediate sprays in gold silk.
Medallion No. 199 is worked entirely in point Russe, and may be
embroidered in one colour, or in alternate branches of scarlet and gold,
or scarlet and black.

       *       *       *       *       *

200.--_Work-Bag_.

Materials: Drab cloth; small pieces of cloth of different colours;
embroidery silk of different colours; scarlet satin; red silk braid; red
cord; cardboard; cotton wool; and a strap of light-coloured leather.

[Illustration: 200.--Work Bag.]

This work-bag is made in the shape of a rolled-up plaid. The outside
consists of drab cloth, trimmed with appliqué embroidery. The inside of
the bag is slightly wadded and lined with red satin, which is quilted in
diamonds. The seams are covered with red braid, and a leather strap
completes the whole. Cut out a good pattern in paper, and then cut the
satin and wadding and the drab cloth which forms the outside. After
having traced the pattern on the cloth, work it with small pieces of
coloured cloth in appliqué embroidery. The different figures are sewn
over the centre partly in point Russe, partly in button-hole stitches,
with embroidery silk. The stems in the middle are worked with silk in
chain stitches. The colours may be chosen according to taste. Cut a
pattern in cardboard, and fasten the drab cloth on it. The edge must be
bordered with red satin, and the satin lining must be sewed in. The ends
of the bag are likewise cut out of cardboard; the inside is wadded and
lined with red satin; the outside worked in appliqué embroidery like the
rest of the bag. All the seams are covered with red silk cord. The
straps are fastened with a few stitches, as seen in the illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

201 _to_ 203.--_Pattern for Braces_.

Materials: Java canvas; black silk; red wool; calico.

[Illustration: 201.--Pattern for Braces (full size).]

These braces are made of Java canvas lined with calico ornamented with
embroidery in black silk and red wool, and edged on either side with
loose button-hole stitch and crochet vandykes in red wool.
Illustration 201 shows part of the embroidered braces, full size. Work
first the embroidery of the braces, then line them with calico; work
loose button-hole stitch and crochet vandykes on all the edges of the
cross bands as well as at the top and bottom of these strips, and sew on
the tabs for the braces between the lining and the canvas. The latter
are then edged with button-hole stitch and crochet-vandykes. The
vandykes are worked as follow--in one row: 1 double in 1 button-hole
stitch, * 1 purl (3 chain, 1 double in the 1st), missing the next
button-hole stitch under it; 1 double in the following button-hole
stitch, repeat from *. The tabs are made of tape worked round with red
button-hole stitch, with button-holes worked with red cotton. No. 203
shows another

[Illustration: 102.--Embroidered Braces.]

way of working these braces on fine ribbed piqué. Work any Berlin wool
work pattern in the common cross stitch over the ribs of the piqué. For
the vandyke border work in every other button-hole stitch, 2 double
divided by 3 chain stitches.

[Illustration: 203.--Pattern for Braces (Full size).]

       *       *       *       *       *

204.--_Embroidery Border for a Reading-Desk_.

Materials: White silk rep; black velvet, rep, or cloth; gold and silver
brocade; gold and silver braid; silk cord and thread.

This pattern is embroidered on white silk rep with silver and gold
thread, and sewn on over a black velvet, rep, or cloth centre. The dark
patterns are worked in appliqué with black velvet, the two other shades
in gold and silver brocade. The embroidery is worked in satin stitch
with gold and silver braid, silk and cord of the same material. The
border can also be worked upon the material for the centre if it is not
intended to contrast with it. The pattern can also be worked entirely in
silk with satin stitch. The size of the border may, of course, be
increased if desired, but the third pattern in the darkest shade must,
in any case, form the centre of it.

[Illustration: 204.--Embroidery Border for a Reading Desk.]

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 205.--Lappet or Sash End in Venetian Embroidery.]

205.--_Lappet or Sash End in Venetian Embroidery._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No. 6 and
No. 12; net and muslin.

The pattern must first be traced on muslin, which is then tacked over
net. The outlines are worked in button-hole stitch, and the veinings are
sewn over, using the coarse cotton for tracing; the muslin is then cut
away all round the pattern.

       *       *       *       *       *

206.--_Venetian Border._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton No. 12 and
No. 16; net and muslin.

[Illustration: 206.--Venetian Border.]

This design is elegant and effective, without there being a great deal
of work in it. It is useful for tuckers for evening dresses or
handkerchief borders. The muslin is laid over the net, sewn neatly over,
and then cut away between the pattern, leaving the net for the ground
work.

[Illustration: 207.--Lace Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

_207.--Lace Insertion._

Materials: Fine black sewing silk; black Brussels net.

This lace insertion is first outlined in running stitch upon the net;
the leaves are then darned across the net holes; the stems are worked in
overcast stitch; the dots are embroidered by darning across the circle
previously outlined; the lace stitches in the centre are formed by
gently enlarging the net holes with a fine stiletto, and then sewn
lightly round, the remaining holes being filled with lace stitches
consisting of fine button-hole stitches, very evenly worked over the
entire space surrounding the open holes.

To be effective the very finest black silk should be employed. This
pattern may be worked in appliqué by placing muslin over net, sewing all
the outlines in fine overcast stitch, and when finished, carefully
cutting away the muslin.

       *       *       *       *       *

208 _and_ 209.--_Slipper on Java Canvas._

Materials: Light brown Java canvas; green silk; green filoselle and
purse silk; green silk ribbon three-fifths of an inch wide; some
wadding; 2 cork soles.

[Illustration: 208.--Slipper on Java Canvas.]

This slipper is very pretty, and easy to work. It is made of light
brown Java canvas, and embroidered in point Russe with green filoselle.
It is lined with green silk, and slightly quilted. The soles are of
cork. The slipper is trimmed all round with a ruche of green silk ribbon
three-fifths of an inch wide, pleated in double box pleats. The heel is
turned down inside. No. 209 shows the pattern of the point Russe stitch
nearly full size.

[Illustration: 209.--Point Russe Stitch for Slipper (No. 208)]

       *       *       *       *       *

210 _and_ 211.--_Medallions in Point Russe_.

Materials: Coloured filoselle, cloth, velvet, cashmere, or silk.

These medallions can be alternated for ornamenting small covers,
cushions, borders, &c. They are worked with coloured filoselle in point
Russe, herring-bone stitch, coral stitch, and knotted stitch, on cloth,
velvet, cashmere, or silk. The middle oval of both medallions contrasts
with the colour of the ground, and must therefore be worked in appliqué
on the latter with herring-bone stitch, before working the outer border.
The wreath on No. 211 is worked in coral stitch; the knots, which
imitate small blossoms, in knotted stitch. The choice of colours is left
to the personal taste of the worker.

[Illustration: 210.--Medallion in Point Russe.]

[Illustration: 211.--Medallion in Point Russe.]

       *       *       *       *       *

212.--_Butterfly for Handkerchief Corner_.

Materials: French lawn or cambric; fine black silk.

This butterfly is worked in the finest black silk procurable, in order
more closely to imitate etching. It is worked in point Russe and scallop
stitch; the dark shaded scallops are worked in button-hole scallop
stitch, the stitches being taken very closely together, but not raised
by the usual method of placing chain stitches beneath the button-hole
stitches. The outlines and flowers are worked in point Russe, the dot in
knotted stitch (see No. 73, _Embroidery Instructions_.)

[Illustration: 212.--Butterfly for Handkerchief Corner.]

The initials are embroidered in raised slanting overcast stitch, and
should be worked with great regularity.

       *       *       *       *       *

213 _to_ 215.--_Pattern for a Couvrette in Appliqué_. (_see pages
576-7_.)

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s embroidery cotton Nos. 24 and
30; cambric muslin; Brussels net; flesh-coloured silk; sewing silk of
the same shade; 1 skein of a darker shade; blue silk; brown silk; gold
thread.

This style of work is most effective for couvrettes or bed covers. It is
worked in cambric muslin and silk, over Brussels net.

The arabesque patterns are worked in cambric muslin, the outlines are
embroidered in overcast, and the material is cut away all round. The
medallions are made of blue silk; the figures upon them are cut out of
flesh-coloured silk, and are gummed first upon tissue-paper, then upon
the blue silk; the figures are further fastened upon the medallions in
overcast stitch with fine silk of a rather darker shade of flesh-colour.
The scarfs are cut out of bright rose-coloured silk; the quiver and
arrows and all the other attributes are worked in gold thread; the hair
in fine brown silk. The edge of the blue silk medallions is worked round
in button-hole stitch, but so as to be easily unripped when the
couvrette has to be cleaned. A border in open ladder stitch is worked
round them (see No. 81, _Embroidery Instructions_). The openings in the
centre pattern are also filled in with lace stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *




CROCHET



INSTRUCTIONS.

[Illustration: A Crochet-Needle]

Cotton or thread, wool or silk, with a crochet-needle, are the materials
required for working crochet. The needle, whether it be steel or bone,
must be smoothly polished. The long wooden and bone crochet-needles are
used for wool; for cotton and silk work short steel needles screwed into
a bone handle are best. The beauty of the crochet-work depends upon the
regularity of the stitches, as is the case with every other style of
needlework. The stitches must be elastic, but if too loose they look as
bad as if too tight. The size of the needle and that of the cotton or
wool must correspond; work only with the point of the needle, and never
move the stitch up and down the needle. The cotton with which you work
must be of the very best quality; for borders, insertions, rosettes,
imitation of guipure, use Evans's crochet cotton; for couvrettes,
counterpanes, covers, &c., use knitting-cotton. All crochet-work
patterns are begun on a foundation chain; there are three kinds of
foundation chains--the plain foundation, the double foundation, and the
purl foundation chain.

The plain foundation chain consists of chain stitches.

[Illustration: 216.--Plain Foundation Chain.]

ILLUSTRATION 216.--Form a loop with the cotton or other material with
which you work, take it on the needle, and hold the cotton as for
knitting on the forefinger and other fingers of the left hand. The
crochet-needle is held in the right hand between the thumb and
forefinger, as you hold a pen in writing; hold the end of the cotton of
the loop between the thumb and forefinger of the left hand, wind the
cotton once round the needle by drawing the needle underneath the cotton
from left to right, catch the cotton with the hook of the needle and
draw it as a loop through the loop already on the needle, which is cast
off the needle by this means and forms one chain stitch. The drawing the
cotton through the loop is repeated until the foundation chain has
acquired sufficient length. When enough chain stitches have been made,
take the foundation chain between the thumb and forefinger of the left
hand, so that these fingers are always close to and under the hook of
the needle. Each stitch must be loose enough to let the hook of the
needle pass easily through. All foundation chains are begun with a loop.


[Illustration: 217.--Double Foundation Chain.]

ILLUSTRATION 217 (_The Double Foundation Chain_).--Crochet 2 chain
stitches, insert the needle downwards into the left side of the 1st
chain stitch, throw the cotton forward, draw it out as a loop, wind the
cotton again round the needle and draw it through the two loops on the
needle, * draw the cotton as a loop through the left side of the last
stitch (see illustration), wind the cotton round the needle, and draw it
through both loops on the needle. Repeat from * till the foundation
chain is long enough.


[Illustration: 218.--Purl Foundation Chain.]

ILLUSTRATION 218 (_Purl Foundation Chain_).--* Crochet 4 chain stitch,
then 1 treble stitch--that is, wind the cotton round the needle, insert
the needle downwards into the left side of the 1st of the 4 chain
stitches, wind the cotton round the needle, draw it through the stitch,
wind the cotton again round the needle, and at the same time draw the
cotton through the last loop and through the stitch formed by winding
the cotton round the needle. Wind the cotton once more round the needle,
and draw it through the 2 remaining loops on the needle. The 4 chain
stitches form a kind of scallop or purl. Repeat from *. The following
crochet stitches require foundation chains like Nos. 216 and 217; they
are all worked in separate rows excepting the two Nos. 222 and 234. Make
a loop at the beginning of every row, as has been described (No. 216),
and take it on the needle.


[Illustration: 219.--Slip Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 219 (_Slip Stitch_).--Draw the needle through the back part
of a foundation chain stitch, or in the course of the work through the
back part of a stitch of the preceding row, wind the cotton round the
needle, and draw it through the stitch and loop on the needle. The
illustration shows a number of slip stitches, the last of which is left
quite loose; the arrow marks the place where the needle is to be
inserted for the next stitch.


[Illustration: 220.--Double Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 220 (_Double Stitch_).--These are worked nearly like the
preceding ones. Draw the cotton as a loop through the back part of a
stitch, wind the cotton round the needle, and draw it through the two
loops on the needle.


[Illustration: 221.--Double Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 221.--These double stitches are worked nearly like the
preceding ones; the 1st row is worked like that of No. 220; in the
following ones insert the needle into the two upper sides of a stitch of
the preceding row.


[Illustration: 222.--Ribbed Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 222 (_The Ribbed Stitch_).--This stitch is worked backwards
and forwards--that is, the right and wrong sides are worked together,
which forms the raised ribs. Insert the needle always into the back part
of every stitch. Work 1 chain stitch at the end of every row, which is
not worked, however, in the following row.


[Illustration: 223.--Slanting Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 223 (_Slanting Stitch, double stitch_).--This stitch is
worked like that described in No. 220; the cotton is not wound round the
needle the first time in the usual manner, but the needle is placed in
the direction of the arrow, above the cotton. Draw the cotton through as
a loop; the stitch is finished like the common double stitch.


[Illustration: 224.--Cross Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 224 (_Cross Stitch_).--This stitch is worked like No. 223
on a foundation like No. 217, only insert the needle through the two
upper sides of a stitch.


[Illustration 225:--Long Double Stitch.]

Illustration 225 (_Long Double_).--For this stitch wind the cotton round
the needle, insert it into the back part of a stitch, draw the cotton
out as a loop, wind the cotton again round the needle, and cast off
together the two loops and the loop formed by winding the cotton round
the needle.


[Illustration 226.--Treble Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 226 (_Treble Stitch_).--These stitches are worked as has
been described for the purl foundation chain, No. 218. The treble
stitches are worked on a foundation chain or in the stitches of the
preceding row.


ILLUSTRATION 227 (_Long Treble_).--These are worked like treble
stitches, only the cotton is wound twice round the needle; the double
long treble (illustration 228) is worked by winding the cotton three
times round the needle. The loops formed by winding the cotton round the
needle are cast off one by one with one of the loops on the needle. The
two loops that remain at the end are cast off together after winding the
cotton round the needle.

[Illustration: 227.--Long Treble Stitch.]

[Illustration: 228.--Double Long Treble Stitch.]


[Illustration: 229.--Cross Treble Stitch.]

[Illustration: 230.--Cross Treble Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 229-231 (_Cross Treble_).--Illustration 229 shows this
stitch completed; illustrations 230 and 231 show them in the course of
the work. Wind the cotton twice round the needle as for a long treble,
insert the needle into the stitch in which the first half of the cross
treble is to be worked, wind the cotton round the needle, draw the
cotton through as a loop, wind the cotton again round the needle and
cast off together with the same the loop on the needle and the loop
formed by throwing the cotton forward; you have now 3 loops left on the
needle, 1 of which has been formed by winding the cotton round the
needle; missing these, wind the cotton again round the needle, miss the
2 next stitches of the foundation chain, and draw a loop through the
third stitch. You have now 5 loops on the needle. Always cast off 2
loops at a time till only 1 loop remains on the needle. Work 2 chain
stitches (if you wish to have the stitches more or less) slanting,
work 1, 2, or 3 chain stitches, missing, of course, the same number of
foundation chain, work 1 treble stitch, inserting the needle, as shown
by the arrow on No. 231, into the 2 cross chain of the completed treble
stitch.

[Illustration: 231.--Cross Treble Stitch.]


[Illustration: 232.--Raised Spots.]

ILLUSTRATION 232 (_Raised Spots_).--The grounding on which these spots
are worked consists of double crochet. They are worked across 3 rows of
the ground, and formed of treble stitches, the spots of one row being
placed between those of the preceding. Work first 2 rows of double
stitch, in the 3rd row work first 2 double stitches and then 1 spot as
follows:--1 treble, inserting the needle into both sides of 1 stitch of
the first row (the preceding row is missed); the treble stitch is only
completed so far that 2 loops remain on the needle; then work 2 treble
stitches in the same stitch as the first, which are also only completed
as far as the first treble stitch, so that after the 2nd treble there
remain 3 loops and after the 3rd 4 loops on the needle (see
illustration). The 4 loops are cast off together by winding the cotton
once more round the needle and drawing it through. Miss under the spot
the next double stitch of the preceding row; the spots are repeated at
intervals of 5 stitches and in every other row.


[Illustration: 233.--Hollow Spots.]

ILLUSTRATION 233 (_Hollow Spots_).--The ground is worked in double
crochet (illustration 220). These spots, which appear raised, consist of
5 treble stitches; they are worked in every other row at intervals of 5
stitches. For working them leave 1 loop on the needle, insert the needle
between the 2 long sides of the last-worked double stitch, and work 5
treble stitches, always inserting the needle into the front part of 1
stitch of the preceding row. The first 4 treble are completed entirely
without taking up the loop which was on the needle; with the fifth
treble stitch only the 3 loops are cast off together by winding the
cotton round the needle. Miss 1 stitch of the preceding row under the
spot.


[Illustration: 234.--Open-work Spots.]

ILLUSTRATION 234 (_Open-work Spots_).--These spots are treble stitches
divided by 2 chain; miss 2 stitches under the latter; for the rest, they
are worked like the raised spots (illustration 232).


[Illustration: 235.--Raised Treble Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 235 (_Raised Treble Stitch_).--These stitches are long
treble worked on a ribbed ground (illustration 222), and are thrown
across 3 rows of the same. The raised treble are always worked on the
same side of the work and in the long side of the corresponding stitch
of the last row but two. After every row with treble stitch comes a row
in ribbed stitch. At the beginning work 3 rows of ribbed stitch; the
treble stitches begin only in the 4th row.


[Illustration: 236.--Purl Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 236 (_Purl Stitch_).--These purl stitches imitate a lace
edging perfectly well. Work 1 double, draw out the loop to a certain
length (this forms the purl), take the needle out of it, insert it in
the front part of the last stitch which has been worked (see
illustration), wind the cotton round the needle and draw it through as a
loop; 1 double, 1 purl, and so on.


[Illustration: 237.--Purl Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 237 (_Purl Stitch turned upwards_).--Work 1 treble, then 7
chain stitch. Insert the needle into the 2nd of the 7 chain stitch
downwards, so that the chain stitches form a scallop upwards (see
illustration), wind the cotton round the needle and draw the cotton
through; work 1 chain stitch and 1 treble in the next stitch but 3,
missing 3 stitches under it.


[Illustration: 238.--Purl Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 238 (_Purl Stitch turned downwards_).--The chain stitches
form a scallop turned downwards. After having worked the 7 chain
stitches take the needle out of the loop, insert it underneath the upper
chain of the 2nd chain stitch, from right to left, and draw it through
the loop in the direction of the arrow. Wind the cotton round the needle
and cast all the loops off together. It is evident that the purl
stitches may be worked at larger or smaller distances.

       *       *       *       *       *



CROCHET PATTERNS.


239.--_Small Crochet Basket_.

Materials: 2 balls of closely-covered white and silver, and 1 ball of
pink and silver twine; a crochet needle.

[Illustration: 239.--Small Crochet Basket.]

For the bottom: Make a chain of 4 stitches and unite it, work 3 long, 3
chain, and repeat three times more.

2nd round: Work 3 long into the 1st 3 chain, make 3 chain, work 3 long
into the next 3 chain, make 3 chain, work 3 long into the same place,
make 3 chain, and repeat.

3rd round: 3 long, 3 chain, working twice into the 3 chain of last
round.

4th round: 3 long, 3 chain, increasing in every other 3rd chain by
working twice into it.

5th round: Increasing in every 3rd chain, repeat.

For the leaves: Make a chain of 32 stitches, then work a row of 1 long
stitch and 1 chain stitch with the silver twine.

2nd round: Work 1 long stitch into each chain stitch in 1st row, make 1
chain stitch, repeat. (At the point, make 4 long, with a chain stitch
between each), repeat on the other side of the chain, 1 long stitch and
1 chain stitch alternately.

3rd round: With pink: Work over a wire in double crochet 1 stitch into
each loop, work 15 more leaves in the same way, join each leaf half way,
then sew it to the centre, work a row of double crochet 1 yard in
length, and twist it for the handle. This should also be crocheted over
wire.

       *       *       *       *       *

240 to 243.--_Couvrette in Crochet_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 10, and
steel crochet needle.

This very pretty pattern is composed of separate circles representing
dahlias in raised work upon an open centre. No. 242 shows one of these
large circles in full size, No. 241 one of the small circles placed in
the spaces between the larger ones, No. 243 part of the border, and No.
240 the couvrette when completed, but in reduced size.

For each large circle make a chain of 20 stitches, and join it into a
circle.

1st round: 30 stitches of double crochet over the circle of chain
stitches.

2nd round: 36 stitches of double crochet.

3rd round: 1 double, 5 chain, miss 1. 4th round:

[Illustration: 240.--Couvrette in Crochet.]

The same as the preceding--the 1 double always on the 3rd chain.

5th round: Close double crochet; 3 stitches in 1 in the centre stitch of
each loop.

6th to 12th round: The same as the 5th, close double crochet, increasing
in the centre of each small scallop, which forms the 18 raised petals of
the dahlia.

13th round: Here begins the open-work border round the dahlia. Work 1
double between 2 petals, taking together the 2 centre stitches, 1 double
in the next, 5 chain. There will be 18 loops of 5 chain in the round.

14th to 17th round: 1 double in centre of each loop, 5 chain between.
18th round: 1 double in centre of 1st loop, 4 chain, 1 treble in next
loop; in the top of this treble stitch work 3 double, with 3 chain
between each; make 4 chain. Repeat the same all round, and the large
circle is completed. Six of these are required.

[Illustration: 241.--Showing one of the small Circles full size of No.
240.]

For each small circle make a chain of 10 stitches, and join it into a
round.

1st round: 16 stitches of close double crochet.

2nd round: 1 treble, 3 chain, miss 1, 8 times.

3rd round: 9 treble over each loop of chain, 1 double between. This
completes 1 of the 6 small circles placed round the large ones in the
centre of the couvrette. The 6 that are placed between the 5 other large
circles have 1 more round, which is worked as follows:--1 treble in the
centre of 1 scallop in the top of this treble stitch, 3 double, with 3
chain between each, 6 chain. Repeat the same all round.

[Illustration: 242.--Showing one of the large Circles full size of No.
240.]

When all the circles are completed, join them together, as seen in
illustration 217, and work the border as follows:--

1st round: 1 treble in one of the trefoil branches of a small circle, 8
chain, 1 treble in next trefoil, 8 chain, 1 treble in 3rd trefoil, 8
chain, 1 long treble in 4th trefoil, 10 chain, 1 long treble in 1
trefoil of a large circle, 1 treble in each of the 4 next trefoils of
the large circle, 8 chain between each 8 chain, 1 long treble in the
last trefoil of the large circle,10 chain. Repeat all round.

2nd round: 2 treble, with 1 chain between, in first stitch of last
round, * 4 chain, miss 5, 2 treble with 1 chain between next stitch.
Repeat from *.

3rd and 4th rounds: The same as the 2nd. The 2 treble always in 1 chain.

5th round: In each 1 chain, 4 treble, with 1 chain between the 2nd and
3rd, 4 chain after the 4 treble. The same all round.

6th round: The same as the 5th.

7th round: 1 treble in 1 chain, 1 trefoil in the top of the treble, 6
chain. Repeat the same all round, which completes the couvrette.

[Illustration: 243.--Border for Couvrette.]

       *       *       *       *       *

244.--_Star in Crochet_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 80, or with
No. 8 or 10 for couvrettes.

A number of these stars joined together will make very pretty strips of
insertion. For this purpose they should be worked with fine cotton. They
may also be used for trimming collars, cuffs, and cravats, the material
being cut away underneath. If worked with crochet cotton No. 8 or 10,
they will make nice couvrettes, bed-quilts, &c.

[Illustration: 244.--Star in Crochet.]

The star is begun by the outer circle. Make a chain of 70 stitches, and
join it into a circle. * Make 10 chain, miss 3, work 1 extra long
treble, 1 treble, and 1 double, inserting the needle under the chain,
then 1 double worked as usual, 1 long double, 2 extra long double, miss
4, and work 1 double, inserting the needle _under_ the 5th. Repeat 13
times from * Fasten off, and for the centre of the star work as
follows:--

1st round: * 10 chain, turn, miss 1 and work 1 double in the next 7
chain, 1 double in the 1st of the 10 chain, thus forming 1 loop. Repeat
from * 5 times more.

2nd round: 12 double on the first loop of chain of the first branch, 1
double in the centre of the branch, 2 chain; slip the stitch which is
upon the needle in one of the stitches of the foundation chain of the
outer circle, work 1 double in the first of the 2 chain last made, then
12 double in the remaining loop of chain of the branch, and 1 double at
the bottom of the branch. Repeat 5 times more from *. The centre star
must be joined on to the outer circle at regular distances.

       *       *       *       *       *

245.--_Crochet Silk Bag over Rings_.

Materials: 2 skeins each of black, blue, rose, and drab coarse purse
twist; 8 skeins of the spangled silk for the top part of the bag and
strings; the tassel for the bottom is made of the silks that are left;
rings.

Work over a ring in double crochet, with black, 48 stitches and fasten
off; this is for the centre ring. Then with the rose colour take a ring
and work 24 stitches in double crochet as before, take a second ring,
and work 24 double crochet over it without cutting off the silk, work
over 4 more rings in the same manner, then work on the other side of the
rings to correspond, join the first and last ring together, and sew in
the centre ring; this completes the 1st circle. Work 12 more rounds in
the same way, 3 rose colour, with drab centre, 3 blue with black, 3 drab
with rose centre, 3 black with blue, join 6 circles of the alternate
colours to the 1st circle, 1 to each ring, then sew the second ring to
the corresponding one of the next circle, till the 6 are united; join
the other 6 circles in the following manner: join one ring to the
second from the one that was sewed to the 1st circle, join the next ring
to the corresponding one of the next circle (which will be the one
opposite to the one sewed in the 1st circle), and repeat, joining the
other 5 in the same way.

[Illustration: 245.--Crochet Silk Bag.]

For the small diamond make a chain of 5 stitches and unite it, work 4
long stitches into the circle, make 2 chain, work 1 single stitch to the
centre of the ring missed in joining the last circle, make 2 chain, work
4 long into the circle, make 2 chain, and work a stitch of single
crochet to the centre of the next ring, make 2 chain, work 4 long into
the same place, make 5 chain, work 4 long into the same place, make 2
chain, and work a stitch of single crochet to the next ring, make 2
chain, and join it to the first of the long stitches; this completes the
diamonds; work 5 more, joining them in the same way, then work over 12
rings, and join one on each side of every diamond; this completes the
lower part of the bag. For the top part of the bag work 3 stitches of
double crochet to the centre of each ring, make 5 chain, and repeat. 1st
round: Work 1 long stitch, make 1 chain, miss 1 loop, and repeat. Work
12 more rounds in the same way, working the long stitch into the chain
stitch of last row. Run some cord in the top of the bag to match one of
the colours used, and make the tassel for the bottom from the silk that
is remaining after working the crochet.

       *       *       *       *       *

246.--_Crochet Sovereign Purse._

Materials: 1 skein of black purse silk: 1 skein of coloured ditto; a few
steel beads; and a steel clasp.

The open portion of this purse is worked in coloured, and the raised
rose and outer border in black, silk, the latter being dotted with steel
beads. A few rows of plain double crochet are worked, increasing where
necessary, to make the work lie flat; then 4 rows of loops of chain in
coloured silk, and then 3 rows of thick double crochet, threading the
beads first on the silk, and pushing them up to the stitches when
required.

[Illustration: 446.--Crochet Sovereign Purse.]

The black silk must now be joined on to the centre, and the little
raised piece worked in treble crochet, inserting the hook on the _upper_
side of the stitches. Three rounds of treble are executed, and when both
sides of the purse are finished they should be joined together (except
where the clasp is put on) by a row of open treble, ornamented with
beads. This purse is so easy to make, that it might be worked without
the least difficulty from the illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

247.--_Stars in Crochet_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 8 or 20.

This pattern can be used for a couvrette or pincushion cover, according
to the size of the cotton with which it is worked.

Each star is begun in the centre by a chain of 8 stitches. In the 1st
stitch work 1 treble, * 4 chain, 1 treble in this same 1st stitch,
repeat from * 3 times more, 4 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 4th of the 8
chain. You have thus formed 8 rays, joined to the 1st stitch. Now work
(without cutting the cotton) the branches, which are begun from the
centre.

1st branch.--1st round: 18 chain, 1 treble in the 13th, so as to form a
purl with the last 5, 2 chain, 3 treble with 2 chain between, missing 2
stitches under the 2 chain, 2 chain, 1 slip stitch in the last of the 18
chain.

2nd round: 2 double over the 1st 2 chain, 2 double with 1 purl between
over the next 2 chain, 2 double over the next 2 chain, 1 purl, 7 double
over the next 5 chain; then, on the other side of the branch, 1 purl, 2
double, 1 purl, 2 double, 2 double with 1 purl between, 2 double on the
last 2 chain of the branch, 1 slip stitch in the stitch from which the
leaf was begun, 5 double over the 4 chain of the circle. Here begins the
second branch.

1st round of the 2nd leaf: 22 chain, 1 double in the last so as to form
a circle.

[Illustration: 247.--Stars in Crochet.]

2nd round: 1 double in each of the 10 first chain, in the next stitch
work 1 double, 1 chain, 1 double to form the point, 1 double in each
of the 10 remaining stitches, 1 slip stitch in the 1st stitch of the 1st
round.

3rd round: 3 double, 1 purl, repeat from * twice more, then work in
double crochet as far as the point, work 2 double with 1 chain between,
then work the 2nd half of the branch the same as the 1st. Before
beginning the next leaf, work 5 double on the chain stitches of the
circle; work 6 branches, repeating alternately the 2 above explained;
cut the cotton and fasten it on again to the point of one of the
branches, in order to join them together by the two following rounds:--

1st round: 1 double in the point of one of the leaves, * 4 chain, 1 purl
under the chain; thus make 5 chain, turn the chain with the crochet to
the right, insert the needle downwards in the first chain, and make a
slip stitch, 4 chain, 1 purl under, 4 chain, 1 purl under, 4 chain, 1
slip stitch in the point of the next leaf, repeat from * five times
more.

2nd round: * 4 double over the nearest 4 chain; 1 purl as usual--that
is, above the chain--4 double over the next 4 chain. Now work 1 trefoil
(thus: 1 chain, 1 purl, 1 chain, 1 purl, 1 chain, 1 double in the 1
double coming just before the 3 purl). 1 double on each of the next 4
chain of last round, 1 purl, 5 double, 1 trefoil, repeat five times from
*.

Join the stars by a few stitches, as seen in the illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

248.--_Crochet Purse over Rings._

Materials: 67 rings; 2 skeins each of cerise and black, and 1 of maize
coarse purse silk.

Work in double crochet with maize over one ring 38 stitches; this is the
centre ring for the bottom of the purse.

[Illustration: 248.--Crochet Purse over Rings.]

Then work with cerise colour over a ring 19 stitches, take another ring
and work 19 stitches, repeat this till you have 6 rings, then work round
the other half of each ring 19 stitches; and when the 6 are finished,
join the first to the last to make a circle; sew the maize ring into the
centre of it, then work over 12 rings with black in the same manner, and
place them outside the cerise circle. Then work over 16 rings with maize
colour, and join them beyond the black, but not to lie flat down; they
are to stand up to form the sides of the purse. Work over 16 rings with
cerise, and these you can join one to each of the former rounds in
working the second half of the crochet, as it will save the sewing. Work
over 16 rings in black, and join them in the same manner to the cerise.
For the edge, with cerise, work into the centre stitch of the ring a
stitch of double crochet, make 5 chain, work into the stitch joining the
8 rings an extra long stitch, make 5 chain, repeat. Then work 4 rounds
of single open crochet.

6th round: * Work a stitch of double crochet and 1 chain alternately,
missing 1 loop between each 4 times, then work a long stitch, make 1
chain, work into the next loop 1 long stitch, make 2 chain, work another
long stitch into the same place, make 1 chain, work a long stitch into
the next loop, repeat from *.

7th round: Work into the 2 chain 1 long stitch, make 2 chain, work
another long stitch into the same place, * make 1 chain, work a stitch
of double crochet into the 1 chain in last round, repeat from * 3 times
more, miss the next 1 chain, * work a stitch of double crochet into the
next 1 chain, make 1 chain, repeat from * 3 times more, then repeat from
the beginning.

8th round: Join the black, work into the 2 chain 1 long stitch, make 2
chain, work another long stitch into the same place, make 2 chain, work
another long stitch into the same place, make 1 chain, work a 4th long
stitch into the same place, * make 1 chain, work a stitch of double
crochet into the 1 chain, repeat from * 3 times more, miss the next 2
stitches of double crochet, * work a stitch of double crochet into the 1
chain, make 1 chain, repeat from * 3 times more, then repeat from the
beginning.

9th round: Work into the 2 chain 1 long stitch, make 2 chain, work
another long stitch into the same place, repeat the stitches of double
crochet with 1 chain between, as in last round, then repeat from the
beginning. 10th and 11th rounds the same as the 9th. Add a tassel at the
bottom, and strings run into the last row of open crochet complete the
purse.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 249.--Crochet Brioche Cushion.]

249.--_Crochet Brioche Cushion_.

Materials: 10 skeins of 12-thread fleecy, of six shades of red (these
should be most of the darker shades); 2 skeins of white ditto; 1 skein
of white filoselle.

Make a chain of 196 stitches with the darkest shade of red wool, and
join it into a circle. Work 1 round of raised spots thus:--Turn the wool
5 times round the needle, insert the needle in 1 chain, and draw it
through all the loops, then work 1 slip stitch, insert the needle in the
next stitch, work 1 double, and begin a fresh spot. Continue in the same
way all round.

2nd round: Divide the round into 7 parts; work 12 spots with the 3rd
shade of red, always working 1 double between each spot, and taking care
to place them between those of preceding round: after 12 spots, work 1
double, then 12 more, and so on.

3rd round: 3rd shade of red, 11 spots, 1 double.

4th round: 4th shade, 10 spots, 3 double.

5th round: 5th shade, 9 spots, 5 double.

6th round: Same shade, 8 spots, 7 double.

7th round: 5th shade, 7 spots, 9 double.

8th round: Same shade, 6 spots, 11 double.

9th round: Same shade, 5 spots, 13 double.

10th round: 6th shade, 4 spots, 15 double.

11th round: Same shade, 3 spots, 17 double.

12th round: Same shade, 2 spots, 19 double.

13th round: Same shade, 1 spot, 21 double. The pattern of raised spots
being now completed, continue to work with the lightest shade of red in
double stitches, decreasing once above each pattern, so as to close up
the circle gradually. The white flowers are worked over the plain part
of the cushion with white wool, and silk for the petals, and a black dot
in the centre. The cushion is stuffed with horsehair and lined with
glazed calico. A round of thick pasteboard is stitched in at the bottom,
to make it stand firmer.

       *       *       *       *       *

_250.--Daisy Pattern for a Crochet Couvrette._

Materials: For a large couvrette, Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's
Head cotton No. 8; for pincushion covers, mats, and such-like small
articles, Boar's Head cotton No. 16 or 20.

A pattern of this description is most useful, as it can be converted to
so many purposes. Counterpanes, couvrettes of every description, mats,
pincushions, and a thousand other things can all be arranged from the
design.

[Illustration: 250.--Daisy Pattern for a Crochet Couvrette.]

Each circle is made separately, and joined to the others, as the last
row is crocheted. Begin in the centre; make 8 chain, insert the needle
in the first, and make * a long treble stitch, then make 3 chain,
repeat 4 times from *, always inserting the needle in the 1st chain
stitch, join the last chain to the 5th of the 1st 8 chain to close the
round.

2nd round: Work 1 double crochet, * 9 chain, turn, work a slip stitch in
each of the 9 chain; work round the stem thus made in close crochet,
working 3 stitches in 1 to turn at the point; miss 1 stitch of preceding
row, work 2 double crochet, and repeat from * 5 times more, making 6
petals in all.

3rd round: Work at the back of the last row, behind the petals; make 1
petal between each petal in last row, 1 double crochet at the back of
each, and cut the cotton at the end of the round.

4th round: 2 double crochet at the point of each of the 12 petals, 5
chain between each petal.

5th round: 2 treble, 5 chain, repeat.

6th and last round: 1 double crochet in the centre of the 1st 5 chain, *
5 chain, 1 treble in the centre of the next 5 chain, 5 chain, 1 slip
stitch in the top of the treble stitch, 6 chain, 1 slip stitch in the
same place, 5 chain, a 3rd slip stitch in the same place, 5 chain, 1
double crochet in the centre of the next 5 chain, repeat from * to the
end of the round. There should be 12 trefoil patterns in the round.

For the couvrette join the circles together, as shown in illustration,
in working the last round. As many circles can be added as may be
required for the couvrette.

       *       *       *       *       *

251.--_Crochet Lace_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 40 or 60.

This lace produces a very good effect when worked with fine cotton. Make
a sufficiently long foundation chain, and work the 1st row entirely in
double stitch.

2nd row: * 1 treble in the next stitch, 1 chain, miss 1 stitch under
it; repeat from *.

3rd row: 1 long treble in the 3rd stitch of the preceding row, * 3 purl
(each consisting of 5 chain, 1 double, in the 1st of the same), 1 long
treble in the same stitch of the preceding row, 1 purl, miss 3, 3 double
in the 3 following stitches, 1 purl, miss 3 stitches, 1 long treble in
the 4th stitch; repeat from *.

[Illustration: 251.--Crochet Lace.]

4th row: * 3 double in the middle of the next 3 purl of the preceding
row, 1 purl, 2 long treble divided by 3 purl in the middle of the 3 next
double in the preceding row, 1 purl; repeat from *.

5th row: * 2 long treble, divided by 3 purl in the middle of the next 3
double of the preceding row, 1 purl, 3 double in the middle of the next
3 purl of the preceding row, 1 purl; repeat from *. Repeat the 4th and
5th rows alternately till the border is wide enough.

       *       *       *       *       *

252.--_Crochet Border_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 12, 16, 24,
or 40.

[Illustration: 252.--Crochet Border.]

This border is suitable for a great variety of purposes, according to
the size of the cotton employed; in coarse cotton it will make a
trimming for couvrettes and berceaunette covers; with fine cotton it can
be used for children's clothes, small curtains, &c. Make a sufficiently
long foundation chain, and work the 1st row: * 2 treble divided by 3
chain in the 1st foundation chain stitch, miss 3; repeat from *.

2nd row: * In the 1st scallop of the preceding row, 1 double, 5 treble,
1 double, then 1 chain, 1 purl (4 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 1st of the
four), 1 chain, miss under these the next chain stitch scallop; repeat
from *.

3rd row: 1 treble in the chain stitch on either side of the purl in the
preceding row, 5 chain.

4th row: * 2 double divided by 7 chain in the two first treble of the
preceding row (insert the needle underneath the upper parts of the
stitch), 10 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 5th of these 10 stitches so as
to form a loop, 4 chain, repeat from *.

5th row: * 1 slip in the middle stitch of the scallop formed by 7 chain
in the preceding row, 4 treble, 3 chain, 5 treble, 3 chain, 4 treble,
all these 13 stitches in the loop of the preceding row, so as to form a
clover-leaf pattern; repeat from *, but fasten the 4th treble with a
slip stitch on the 10th treble of the preceding figure.

6th row: In the first and last stitch of the 5 middle treble of the
clover-leaf 1 double, 7 chain between, 7th row: * 1 double in the 2nd
chain stitch of the scallop which is above the 5 middle treble of the
clover-leaf, 2 chain, 1 purl (5 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 1st), 2
chain, 1 double in the next chain stitch of the same scallop, 2 chain, 1
purl, 2 chain, miss one chain of the scallop, 1 double, 2 chain, 1 purl,
2 chain, 1 double in the next chain stitch, 3 chain. 1 double in the
middle stitch of the following scallop, 3 chain, repeat from *.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 253.--Crochet Border.]

253--_Crochet Border_

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 24, 40, or
60, according to the article for which it is required.

On a sufficiently long foundation chain work the 1st row: 1 double in
each chain stitch.

2nd row: Alternately 1 double, 7 chain, miss under the latter 3 stitches
of the preceding row.

3rd row: 1 treble in each double of the preceding row, 1 double in the
middle stitch of each scallop, 2 chain between.

4th row: 1 double on each double of the preceding row, 1 treble on each
treble, 3 chain between.

5th row: 1 double on each treble of the preceding row, 3 chain between.

6th row: 1 double in each stitch of the preceding row.

7th row: * 1 treble in the 1st stitch of the preceding row, 4 chain,
miss 1, 3 treble in the following 3 stitches, miss 3 stitches, 3 treble
in the following 3 stitches, 4 chain, miss 1 stitch, 1 treble, 3 chain,
miss 4; repeat from *.

8th row: Repeat regularly 8 treble in the scallop formed of 4 chain in
the preceding row, 1 double in the middle of the following 3 chain.

9th row: * 1 double in the 4th treble of the preceding row, 2 treble, 1
long treble in next treble but 2, 2 long treble in each of the 2
following treble, 1 long treble, 2 treble in the next treble, 1 double
in the next treble but 2, 3 chain, 1 purl (4 chain, 1 slip), 3 chain
stitch; repeat from *.

10th row: * 1 double in the 4th treble of the preceding row, 2 chain, 1
purl, 2 chain, miss 2 under them, 1 double, 2 chain, 1 purl, 2 chain, 1
double in the next chain but 1 of the next scallop, 2 chain, 1 purl, 2
chain, 1 double in the 2 chain stitch after the purl of the preceding
row, 2 chain, 1 purl, 2 chain; repeat from *.

11th row: In each scallop of the preceding row 2 double (they must meet
on either side of the purl); they are divided alternately by 5 chain,
and by a scallop formed of 2 chain, 1 purl, and 2 chain, only in the
chain stitch scallops which join the two treble figures work no double,
but 2 chain, 1 purl, 2 chain.

       *       *       *       *       *

_254 to 257.--Wicker Arm Chair, covered with Crochet._

Material: Berlin wool in two colours.

[Illustration: 254.--Wicker Arm Chair, covered with Crochet.]

The seat and back of this arm-chair are covered with two round
couvrettes, worked in crochet with Berlin wool of two colours. They are
fastened on the chair with woollen braid, finishing off with tassels of
the same colour. Begin each couvrette in the centre with a foundation
chain of 6 stitches, with the lightest wool; join them into a circle,
and work the 1st round in the following manner:--12 double.

2nd round: * 3 chain, 1 double, in the next stitch of the 1st round,
inserting the needle in the upper part of the stitch; repeat from * 11
times more; at the end of this round work 1 slip stitch in the 1st chain
of this round. We shall not repeat any more the repetitions from * to
the end of the round.

3rd round: * 4 chain, 1 double, in the next scallop of the preceding
round; at the end of the round 4 chain.

4th round: 4 double in each scallop of the preceding round.

5th round: Begin to work with the darker wool and crochet slip stitch,
inserting the needle in the front chain of the stitches of the 4th
round.

The 6th round is worked once more with light wool, and consists entirely
of double stitch, worked by inserting the needle at the back of the
stitches of the 4th round, so that the slip stitches appear raised on
the right side of the work, and form a round of chain stitches. The
middle part of the couvrette is then finished.

[Illustration: 255.--Pattern for Arm Chair Border.]

[Illustration: 256.--Border for Arm Chair (254).]

Illustration 257 shows it in full size.

7th round: * 2 chain, missing 1 stitch of the preceding round under
them, 1 double.

8th round: * 3 chain, 1 double, in the next scallop of the preceding
round.

9th round: 3 double in each scallop.

10th round, like the 5th;

11th round, like the 6th;

[Illustration: 257.--Couvrette for Arm Chair (254).]

12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th rounds, like the 7th--11th;

17th--19th rounds like the 7th--9th.

20th round: Alternately 1 treble with the light wool, 1 treble with the
dark; but every treble stitch must be cast off with the wool of the
colour of the next stitch; that is, a light treble stitch with the dark
wool, and a dark treble stitch with the light wool. Now and then crochet
2 treble stitches in one stitch of the preceding round, so that the
couvrette remains perfectly flat.

21st round: 1 double in every stitch.

The 22nd--31st rounds consist of a double repetition of the 7th--11th
rounds.

The 32nd and 33rd rounds are made in open work like the 7th and 8th
rounds.

The 34th round is worked in treble stitches like the 20th round. Then
work the outer border. It consists of chain stitch scallops which are
worked alternately with dark and light wool. Illustration No. 256 shows
a part of the border with the treble round in full size. Work from it
with the light wool 1 double on 1 light treble stitch of the preceding
round, 5 chain, 1 double, on the next light treble, throw the wool off
the needle and let it hang over the right side of the work; crochet with
the dark wool 1 double on the treble stitch between the 2 double of this
round, leave the wool on the right side of the work; 5 chain, 1 double,
on the next dark treble. Take the needle again out of the loop, draw the
wool on to the right side, and work the next chain stitch scallop again
with the light wool.

Instead of this border, pattern No. 255 may be worked. It consists of 3
rounds to be worked after the 34th round of the couvrette.

1st round of the border: With dark wool, * 1 double in 1 stitch, of the
34th round; 1 double, 3 treble, 1 double, in the next stitch; repeat
from *.

2nd round: With the light wool, * 1 treble, inserting the needle in the
next treble stitch of the 34th round, thus working over the double
stitch between the spots of the preceding round; 1 chain.

3rd round * 3 double in each chain stitch of the preceding round. To
work the 2nd of these 3 double, insert the needle at the same time in
the upper part of the middle treble of the 1st round.

4th round: Dark wool, * 1 double in each double of the preceding round,
miss 1, and work 3 treble in the next stitch but one; the last of these
3 treble is cast off with light wool, miss 1, and continue to work with
the light wool 1 double in the next stitch but one, miss 1, 3 treble in
the next stitch, cast off the last with the dark wool, miss 1; repeat
from *.

       *       *       *       *       *

_258 to 260.--Crochet Insertions._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 30, 40, or
60.

[Illustration: 258.--Crochet Insertion.]

These insertions are worked with crochet cotton of sizes which depend
upon the use you wish to make of them. The insertion seen in
illustration 258 is worked the long way in 8 rows. Make a sufficiently
long foundation chain, and work the 1st row as follows:--1 slip stitch
in the 1st stitch of the foundation, * 5 chain, miss 3, 1 double in the
next stitch but 3, repeat from *.

2nd row: 1 slip stitch in the middle of the 1st 5 chain, * 3 chain, 1
slip stitch in the middle stitch of the next 5 chain, repeat from *.

3rd row: 1 treble in the 1st stitch, * 1 leaf worked as follows: 6
chain, then without noticing the loop left on the needle 1 long treble
in the 2nd and 1 in the 1st of the 6 chain; these stitches are not cast
off separately, but together with the loop left on the needle. Then 5
chain, miss 7, 1 treble in the 8th stitch, repeat from *.

4th row: 1 double in the 1st of the 5 chain, * 8 chain, 1 double in the
1st of the next 5 chain, repeat from *.

5th row: * 1 leaf as in the 3rd row, 1 double in the double stitch of
the preceding row, 5 chain, repeat from *.

6th row: 1 treble in the point of the 1st leaf, * 7 chain, 1 treble in
the point of the next leaf, repeat from *.

7th and 8th rows: Like the 1st and 2nd.


[Illustration: 259.--Crochet Insertion.]

The insertion seen in illustration 259 is worked in 6 rows, and is begun
in the centre on a foundation chain sufficiently long not to be worked
too tight.

1st row: 4 double in the 1st 4 stitches, * 4 double divided in the same
way on the other side of the foundation chain, inserting the needle in
the 1st row into the 2 chain. Illustration 260 shows an insertion which
imitates darned netting; it is worked on a grounding imitating netting
with raised figures. The grounding consists of 9 rows. Work on a
sufficiently long foundation chain the 1st row as follows: 1 cross
treble in the 1st and 3rd stitch, * 2 chain, missing 2 stitches under
them, 1 cross treble in the 6th and 8th stitch, repeat from *.

2nd row: 1 double in the 1st stitch, * 9 chain, miss 4 under them, 1
double in the 5th stitch, repeat from *.

3rd to 8th rows: 1 double in the middle stitch of every chain stitch
scallop, 4 chain between. 9th row: Like the 1st. Work from illustration
square patterns on this grounding, consisting each of 4 leaves; for
these leaves carry on the cotton taken double in double windings from 1
double stitch to another, so as to have 4 threads lying close to each
other; darn these as can be seen in illustration, with single cotton.

[Illustration: 260.--Crochet Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

261.--_Crochet Lace_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 30.

[Illustration: 261.--Crochet Lace.]

A particular kind of purl makes this border look very like guipure lace.
Begin with a foundation chain worked in the following manner:--* 3
chain, the last of them forms 1 purl; this is made by drawing out a long
loop on the needle, taking the needle out of the loop, inserting it in
the chain stitch before the last one, drawing the cotton through it, and
continuing to work so that the loop out of which the needle has been
drawn forms 1 purl. All the purl must be equally long; to do this more
easily the loop may be kept on the needle till a chain stitch has been
worked in that which comes just before the purl, continue the foundation
chain, and repeat from *.

1st row: 1 long double in the 1st stitch of the foundation, * 1 chain, 1
slip stitch in the nearest purl of the foundation chain; repeat from *.

2nd row: 1 double in the 1st stitch, * 1 purl, 1 chain, missing 1 stitch
under it; 1 slip stitch in the slip stitch of the preceding row; repeat
from *.

3rd row: Like the 1st.

4th row: 1 double in the 1st stitch, * 1 purl, 5 chain, 1 purl, 1 chain,
missing 5 stitches under them; 1 double in the 6th stitch; repeat from *.

5th row: 1 long double in the 1st stitch, 3 chain, 1 purl, 1 chain, * 1
double in the middle of the next 5 chain of the preceding row, 1 purl, 5
chain, 1 purl, 1 chain; repeat from *.

6th to 9th rows: Alternately like the 4th and 5th rows.

10th row: 1 double in the 1st stitch, * 6 chain, 1 double long treble
(throw the cotton 3 times round the needle) in the 1st of these chain
stitches; the stitch is only completed so far as still to leave 2 loops
on the needle; 1 double long treble in the same chain stitch. This
stitch is cast off so as to leave in all 3 loops, and the cotton over
the needle; these loops are cast off together by drawing the cotton once
through them. This forms 1 leaf, or one-half of the bell-shaped
patterns. 3 purl, 1 chain, 1 leaf like the preceding one, 1 slip stitch
in the 1st of the first 6 chain stitches; the other half of the pattern
is then completed; 1 purl, 5 chain, 1 purl, 1 chain, 1 double in the
middle stitch of the next scallop of the preceding row, 1 purl, 5 chain,
1 purl, 1 chain, 1 double in the middle stitch of the following scallop
11th row: 1 slip stitch in the next purl of the preceding row, 1 purl, 2
chain, 1 slip stitch in the next purl of the preceding row, 1 purl, 2
chain, 1 slip stitch in the following purl, 1 purl (the 3 purl which are
worked on the 3 purl of the bell-shaped pattern are made in this row and
in the following one as follows:--Crochet 1 chain after the slip stitch,
leave it for 1 purl, and work the next chain stitch in the slip stitch),
1 purl, 5 chain, 1 purl, 1 chain, 1 double in the middle stitch of the
following scallop, 1 purl, 3 chain, 1 purl, 1 chain. 12th row: 3 purl on
the next 3 purl of the preceding row, 3 chain between, 1 purl, 3 chain,
1 purl, 1 chain, 1 double in the middle stitch of the next 5 chain
stitches, 1 bell-shaped pattern like those of the 10th row, 1 purl, 3
chain, 1 purl, 1 chain.

       *       *       *       *       *



CROCHET D'OYLEYS IN IMITATION OF POINT LACE.


262--_D'Oyley No_. 1.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20.

Pattern No. 1.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, unite it.

Round 1: * 1 double crochet, 9 chain, repeat from * 7 times more, 1
double crochet, unite it to the 1st stitch.

Round 2: 3 single crochet up the 3 1st of the chain in last row, *, 5
long into the loop of 9 chain, 1 chain, repeat from *.

Round 3: 1 long into the 1 chain in last round, 9 chain, repeat.

Round 4: 11 double crochet into the 9 chain in last round, repeat.

Round 5: 1 double crochet, 5 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat.

Round 6: 1 double crochet into the 5 chain, 5 chain, repeat.

Round 7: The same as 6th.


No. 2.--Make a chain of 6 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: * 1 double crochet, 4 chain, repeat from * 5 times more.

Round 2: Into the 4 chain 1 double crochet, 4 long, and 1 double
crochet, repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet over the double crochet in 1st round, 6 chain,
repeat.

Round 4: Into the 6 chain in last round 1 double crochet, 6 long, 1
double crochet, repeat.

Round 5: 1 double crochet over the one in 3rd round, 8 chain, repeat.

Round 6: Into the 8 chain 1 double crochet, 8 long, 1 double crochet,
repeat.

Round 7: 1 double crochet over the 1 in 5th round, 10 chain, repeat.

Round 8: Into the 10 chain 1 double crochet, 10 long, 1 double crochet,
repeat.

Round 9: 1 double crochet over the 1 in 7th round, 12 chain, repeat.

Round 10: Into the 12 chain 1 double crochet, 12 long, 1 double crochet,
repeat.

Round 11: 1 double crochet over the 1 in 9th round, 14 chain, repeat.

Round 12: Into the 14 chain 1 double crochet, 14 long, 1 double crochet,
repeat.

Round 13: 1 double crochet over the 1 in 11th round, 14 chain, repeat.
Work 3 patterns of No. 2 for this d'oyley.


No. 3.--Make a chain of 12 stitches, and unite it. Into the circle 1
double crochet, *, 2 long, 3 chain, repeat from * twice more, 2 double
long, 4 chain, 2 double long, * 3 chain, 2 long, repeat from * twice
more, 1 double crochet, 7 chain. Repeat from the beginning. In working
the 2nd pattern, join it to the 1st with the 2nd 3 chain, work 3 leaves
in this manner, then make only 3 chain, and work a 4th leaf without
joining it to the 3rd, make 3 chain after 4th leaf, and work a stitch of
double crochet into last 7 chain, make 3 chain. Work a 5th leaf, and
join it to the 4th as before, 3 chain, 1 double crochet into the next 7
chain, 3 chain. Work a 6th leaf in the same way, and join it; but make
no chain stitch after the 6th leaf. Work 3 patterns of No. 3 for this
d'oyley.


No. 4.--The same as No. 3, only work 4 leaves instead of 6, 2 on each
side. Work 3 patterns of No. 4 for this d'oyley.


No. 5.--Work the 3 1st leaves of No. 3 This is not repeated in this
d'oyley.

[Illustration: 262.--D'Oyley No. 1.]


No. 6.--Make a chain of 15 stitches, and unite it. Work into the circle
1 double crochet, 7 long, 6 double, 6 long, 5 chain, 6 double long, 7
long, 1 double crochet, 7 chain, joining the 7th long stitch to the
corresponding stitch in 1st leaf, 3 chain. Work the 3rd leaf the same as
the 1st without joining it to the 2nd, 3 chain, 1 double crochet into
the 7 chain, 3 chain, work a 4th leaf, and join it to the 3rd, 3 chain,
and join it to the 1st stitch of double crochet at the beginning of the
1st leaf. This pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 7.--Tie a round of cotton about this size O.

Round 1: 20 double crochet into the round.

Round 2: 2 double crochet into successive loops, work 2 into 3rd loop,
repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet into every loop.

Round 4: 1 double crochet, 5 chain, miss 2 loops, repeat.

Round 5: Into the 5 chain in last round 2 long, 5 chain, 2 more long
stitches into the same place, 2 chain, repeat.

Round 6: Into the 5 chain 1 double crochet, 6 long, 1 double crochet, 5
chain, repeat. This pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 8.--Make a chain of 10 stitches, and unite it.

Round I: 28 double long into the circle.

Round 2: 2 double crochet between each long in last round.

Round 3: 1 long, 2 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat.

Round 4: 3 long into the 2 chain, 1 chain, repeat.

Round 5: 1 double crochet into the 1 chain in last round, 5 chain,
repeat. This pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 9.--1st row: Make a chain of 30 stitches, work 1 long stitch into
the 6th, *, 3 chain stitches, miss 3 loops, 1 long into the next, repeat
from * to the end of the row.

2nd row: 11 chain, *, 1 double crochet on the other side of the chain
into the centre one of the 3 between the long stitch, 1 chain, turn, and
work into the 11 chain 3 double crochet and 9 long, 11 chain, repeat
from * 7 times more, work into the chain stitches at the end 3 loops of
11 chain with the double crochet and long stitch as before, then work
the other half of the pattern to correspond. 3rd row: Into the space
between the long stitches 5 double crochet, 2 chain, repeat. This
pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 10.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: Into the circle 24 double long, with 1 chain between each.

Round 2: 2 double crochet into the 1 chain in last round, repeat.

Round 3: 1 long, 2 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat.

Round 4: 1 double crochet into the 2 chain in last round, 5 chain,
repeat. This pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 11.--Make a chain of 7 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 20 long into the circle.

Round 2: 1 double crochet into every loop.

Round 3: 1 double crochet, 6 chain, miss 2 loops, repeat.

Round 4: 1 double crochet into the 6 chain, 7 chain, repeat. Round 5: 10
double crochet into the 7 chain, repeat.

Round 6: 1 long, 2 long into the next loop, repeat.

Round 7: 1 double crochet, 5 chain, miss 3 loops, repeat. This pattern
is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 12.--Make a chain of 21 stitches, and unite it. Round 1: 30 double
crochet into the circle. Round 2: *, 21 chain, join it to the 18th, work
into the circle 1 double crochet, 2 long, 3 chain, 2 long, 5 chain, 2
long, 7 chain, 2 long, 5 chain, 2 long, 3 chain, 2 long and 1 double
crochet, 1 single crochet into the 1st double crochet, 3 chain, 4 double
crochet into the 3 chain, 2 chain, 6 double crochet into the 5 chain, 2
chain, 4 double crochet into the 7 chain, 3 chain, 4 double crochet into
the same place, 2 chain, 6 double crochet into the 5 chain, 2 chain, 4
double crochet into the 3 chain, 3 chain, 1 single crochet into the
stitches of double crochet at the end, 3 single crochet down the 3 for
the stem, 9 single crochet into successive loops round the circle,
repeat from * twice more. This pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 13.--*, make 9 chain stitches, turn, 1 double crochet into each
loop, repeat from * twice more, then work round both sides of these 3
points 1 double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop at the top of each
point, work twice into the same loop, then 5 chain, 1 double crochet
into each end, unite the 5th to the last of the centre point of 9. This
pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 14.--Round 1: * make a chain of 13 stitches, and unite it, repeat
from * 4 more times.

Round 2: 1 double crochet into 6 successive loops, 3 stitches into the
7th, 1 into each of the next 6 loops, repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet, 7 chain, 1 double crochet into the centre 1
of the 3 in last, 7 chain, miss 6, repeat.

Round 4: 1 double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat. This pattern is
not repeated.


No. 15.--*, make a chain of 19 stitches, unite it, 3 long into
successive loops, 3 double long, 2 long, 1 double crochet, 5 chain, 1
double crochet into the next loop, 7 chain, 1 double crochet into the
same place, 5 chain, work into successive loops 1 double crochet, 2
long, 3 double long, 3 long, unite the last to the first, 9 chain,
repeat from * once more, then 5 double crochet into the 5 1st of the 9
chain, 7 chain, 1 double crochet into each, and 1 into each of the 4
remaining of the 9 chain. This pattern is not repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 16.--Make a chain of 11 stitches, *, work into successive loops 2
double crochet, 7 long, 2 double crochet, 2 more double crochet into the
same loop as the last, repeat from * once, make a chain of 24 stitches,
unite to the 20th, work into the circle, *, 1 long, 3 chain, 1 long,
repeat from * 12 times, work into the 3 chain 1 long, 3 chain, work
another long into the same place, repeat, join the last with 1 single
crochet to the last of the 24 chain, 2 double crochet over the 2 of the
leaf, 7 long into successive loops, 4 double long into successive loops,
4 long into the next loop, and 1 long into the next. This pattern is not
repeated. When all these pieces are done, join them as shown in the
engraving, sewing them firmly together with the same cotton, then work
an edging round in the following manner:--1st row: 1 double long into
the 4 chain at the point of the leaf of No. 4 pattern, 7 chain, 1 double
long into the 2nd 3 chain in the same leaf, 8 chain, 1 double long into
the 1st 3 chain of the 2nd leaf of the same pattern, 15 chain, 1 long
into the 4 chain of No. 6 pattern, 15 chain, 1 long into the 4 chain of
the next leaf in the same pattern, 12 chain, 1 long into the 3rd 5 chain
from the join of the 11th pattern, 6 chain, 1 single crochet into the
2nd 5 chain from the long stitch, 9 chain, 1 single crochet into the 3rd
5 chain from the last, 6 chain, 1 long into the 2nd 5 chain from the
last, 12 chain, work into the 2nd 5 chain from the join of the 7th
pattern 1 long, 8 chain, 1 double crochet into the next 5 chain, 9
chain, 1 long into the next 5 chain, 8 chain, 1 double crochet in the
1st 3 chain from the join of 4th pattern, 11 chain, 1 double crochet
into the 1st 3 chain of the 2nd leaf of the same pattern, 6 chain, 1
double crochet into the last 3 chain of the same leaf, 4 chain, 1 double
crochet into the 3 chain of No. 5 pattern, 6 chain, 1 long into the 7
chain between the leaves of the same pattern, 10 chain, 1 long into the
next 7 chain, 6 chain, 1 long into the 1st 3 chain of the 3rd leaf of
the same pattern, 12 chain, 1 single crochet into the 3rd 5 of double
crochet from the join of 9th pattern, 8 chain, 1 single crochet into the
centre of the 2nd 5 double crochet from the last, 11 chain, 1 single
crochet into the 2nd 5 of double crochet from the last, 12 chain, 1
double crochet into the 7 chain of 15th pattern, 7 chain, 1 double
crochet into the 6th long stitch of the same leaf, 11 chain, 1 double
crochet into the end of the stem of 15th pattern, 8 chain, 1 double long
into the 1st 3 chain of the 4th pattern, 4 chain, 1 double long into the
last 3 chain of the same leaf, 9 chain, 1 double long into the 2nd 3
chain of the 2nd leaf, 12 chain, 1 long into the 3rd 3 chain of No. 16
pattern, 8 chain, 1 long into the 2nd 3 chain of the same pattern from
the last, 12 chain, 1 long into the 3rd 5 chain from the join of the
10th pattern, 10 chain, 1 long into the 3rd 5 chain from the last, 12
chain, 1 double crochet into the centre of the 7 of double crochet in
12th pattern, 12 chain, 1 long into the 5 double crochet of same
pattern, 8 chain, 1 double crochet into the 3 chain in centre of same
leaf, 9 chain, 1 long into the 3rd 5 chain from the join of the 8th
pattern, 8 chain, 1 single crochet into the 3rd 5 chain from the last,
10 chain, 1 double long into the 3rd 5 chain from the stitch of single,
13 chain, and join it to the double long stitch at the beginning of the
row. 2nd row: *, 12 chain, and unite it, 1 chain to cross, and on the
other side into the circle 1 double crochet, 2 long, 3 chain, 2 long, 3
chain, 2 double long, 4 chain, then work down the other side to
correspond, 8 double crochet into successive loops of the foundation,
repeat from *, joining the leaves in the 1st 3 chain.

       *       *       *       *       *

_263.--D'Oyley No. 2._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20.

Pattern No. 1.--Make a chain of 4 stitches, and unite it. Round 1: 2
double crochet into each loop.

Round 2: 2 double crochet into each loop.

Round 3: 1 double crochet, 2 double crochet into the next loop, repeat.

Round 4: 1 double crochet into each loop.

Round 5: 1 double crochet, 5 chain, miss 2 loops, repeat.

Round 6: 9 double crochet into the 5 chain, repeat.

Round 7: 9 double crochet into successive loops, beginning on the 5th of
the 9 in last round, 5 chain, 1 single crochet into the last double
crochet, and repeat.

Round 8: 1 double crochet into the centre one of the 9 in last round, 11
chain, repeat. Round 9: 15 double crochet into the 11 chain in last
round, repeat. Round 10: 15 double crochet into successive loops,
beginning on the 8th of the 15 in last round, 5 chain, 1 single crochet
into the last double crochet, repeat. Round 11: 1 double crochet into
the centre one of the 15 in last round, 17 chain, repeat. Round 12: 21
double crochet into the 17 chain in last round.

[Illustration: 263.--D'Oyley No. 2.]


No. 2.--Make a chain of 7 stitches, and unite it. Round 1: *, 7 chain, 1
double crochet into the circle, repeat from * twice more.

Round 2: 12 long into the 7 chain, repeat.

Round 3: 2 long into each loop.

Round 4: 1 long, 2 chain, miss 2 loops, repeat.

Round 5: 2 long into the 2 chain in last round, 1 chain, repeat.

Round 6: 1 double crochet into the 1 chain, 5 chain, repeat.


No. 3.--Make a chain of 14 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: Into the circle 1 double crochet, 7 long, 6 double long, 4
chain, 6 double long, 7 long, 1 double crochet.

Round 2: 1 double crochet into every loop.

Round 3: 2 chain, miss 1 loop, 1 long and repeat, 4 long at the point,
finish with a single stitch, 3 chain, and repeat this once more.


No. 4.--Make a chain of 13 stitches, and unite it, chain of 15 and unite
it, chain of 13 and unite it, work 6 double crochet into successive
loops, beginning on the 1st of the 1st loop of 13, 3 into the next loop,
and 1 into each of the 6 next, 1 double crochet into each of the 1st 7
of the loop of 15, 3 into the next, 1 into each of the next 7, 1 double
crochet into each of the 6 1st of the next loop of 13, 3 into the next,
1 into each of the next 6.

2nd row: 1 double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat.


No. 5.--Make a chain of 13 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: Into the circle 3 double crochet, 3 long, 3 double long, 5
treble long, 3 double long, 3 long, 3 double crochet.

Round 2: 1 double crochet into each of the 9 1st loops, 2 into each of
the 2 next, and 3 into the next, 2 into each of the 2 next, and 1 into
each of the 9 next. Round 3: 1 long, *, 3 chain, 1 long into the next
loop, repeat from * at the end, unite the last to the 1st stitch, 9
chain, repeat from the beginning; in uniting the last stitch of the 2nd
leaf, take up the centre stitch of the 9 chain with it, make 5 chain,
and work a 3rd leaf in the same manner; in uniting the last stitch of
the 3rd leaf, take up the last of the 5 chain with it, make 9 chain,
turn, and work 1 double crochet into each, join the last to the last of
the 5 and 9 chain stitch.


No. 6.--Make a chain of 6 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 double crochet into 1 loop, 5 chain, repeat 5 times more.

Round 2: Into the 5 chain 1 double crochet, 3 long, 1 double crochet,
repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet over the 1st double crochet in last round, 7
chain, repeat.

Round 4: Into the 7 chain in last round 2 double crochet, 7 long, 2
double crochet, and repeat.

Round 5: 1 double crochet into the 1st double crochet in last round, 11
chain, repeat.

Round 6: Into the 11 chain in last round 3 double crochet, 9 long, 3
more double crochet, repeat.


No. 7.--1st row: Make a chain of 20 stitches. 1 long into the 15th, *, 2
chain, miss 2 loops, 1 long into the next, repeat from * to the end of
the row.

2nd row: Turn, into the 2 chain 1 double crochet, 2 long, 1 double
crochet, repeat this to the end, then into the 5 chain 1 double crochet,
2 long, 1 double long, 2 long, 1 double crochet, work the other side to
correspond.

3rd row: 1 double crochet into the 1st double crochet in last row, 7
chain, and repeat to the point, 7 chain, 1 double crochet into the
double long, work the other side to correspond. 4th row: Into the 7
chain 4 double crochet, 3 chain, 1 single into the last double crochet,
4 more double crochet into the same place, repeat.


No. 8.--1st row: 1 chain of 7 stitches, 1 double crochet into each of
the 6 1st, 3 stitches into the 7th, work on the other side of the chain
to correspond. 2nd row: 1 double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat.
3rd row: 5 double crochet into the 3 chain, repeat.


No. 9.--The same as No. 3 in the 1st d'oyley, only 5 leaves instead of
6, 2 on each side, and 1 at the end; 2 of these will be required for
this d'oyley.


No. 10.--Work the 2 1st leaves of No. 4 in the 1st d'oyley; 3 of these
will be required for this d'oyley.


No. 11.--Work only 1 leaf of No. 4 in the 1st d'oyley. This is not to be
repeated in this d'oyley.


No. 12.--The same as No. 4 in 1st d'oyley.


No. 13.--The same as No. 5.


No. 14.--The same as No. 8 in 1st d'oyley.


No. 15.--The same as No. 10.


No. 16.--The same as No. 11 in the 1st d'oyley.


No. 17.--The same as No. 2 in 1st d'oyley; 2 of these will be required.


No. 18.--The same as No 6 in 1st d'oyley; 2 of these will be required.
When all these pieces are done, sew them firmly together, and work the
edging round in the following manner:--1 double crochet into the 1st 4
chain of 9th pattern, 9 chain, 1 double crochet into the last 3 chain of
same leaf, 4 chain, 1 double crochet into the 1st 3 chain of 2nd leaf,
10 chain, 1 double crochet in the 4 chain of same leaf, 8 chain, 1 long
into the 4th of the 5 chain, from the joining of 15th pattern, 4 chain,
1 double crochet into the 2nd 5 chain, 4 chain, 1 long into the 2nd 5
chain from the last, 12 chain, 1 long into the last 3 chain of 10th
pattern, 3 chain, 1 double crochet into the 4 chain of same leaf, 9
chain, 1 double crochet into the 4 chain of 2nd leaf, 12 chain, 1 long
into the 1st double crochet from the join of No. 6 pattern, 9 chain, 1
long into the next stitch of double crochet after the long stitch, 16
chain, 1 long into the 3rd 5 chain from the join of 14th pattern, 8
chain, 1 double crochet into the 3rd 5 chain from the long stitch, 9
chain, 1 long into the 3rd 5 chain from the stitch of double crochet,
9 chain, 1 long into the 1st 3 chain of 10th pattern, 8 chain, 1 double
crochet into the 4 chain of same leaf, 12 chain, 1 double crochet into
the 4 chain of 15th pattern, 8 chain, 1 double crochet into the last 3
chain of same leaf, 9 chain, 1 long into the 1st 14 chain from the join
of 17th pattern, 10 chain, 1 long into the next 14 chain of same
pattern, 14 chain, 1 long into the 4th 5 chain from the join of 16th
pattern, 6 chain, 1 double crochet into the 2nd 5 chain from last, 6
chain, 1 long into the 2nd 5 chain from last, 12 chain, 1 double crochet
into the 1st 4 chain of 9th pattern, 8 chain, 1 double crochet into the
last 3 chain of same leaf, 4 chain, 1 double crochet into the 1st 3
chain of 2nd leaf, 5 chain, 1 double crochet into the last 3 chain of
2nd leaf, 6 chain, 1 double crochet into the last 3 chain of 10th
pattern, 8 chain, 1 double crochet into the 7 chain of same pattern, 6
chain, 1 double crochet into the 1st 3 chain of 2nd leaf, 11 chain, 1
double crochet into the 4 chain of 11th pattern, 9 chain, 1 double
crochet into the last 3 chain of same pattern, 8 chain, 1 long into the
centre 3 chain of 1st leaf of 12th pattern, 7 chain, 1 double crochet
into the 1st 3 chain of 2nd leaf same pattern, 7 chain, 1 double crochet
into the 4 chain of same leaf, 10 chain, 1 long into the 5th 3 chain
from the join of the 3rd pattern, 4 chain, 1 double crochet into the 2nd
3 chain, 4 chain, 1 long into the 2nd 3 chain of same pattern, 8 chain,
1 long into the 1st 14 chain from join of 17th pattern, 12 chain, 1 long
into the next 14 chain of same pattern, 10 chain, and unite. 2nd row:
The same edging as to 1st d'oyley.

       *       *       *       *       *

264.--_D'Oyley No. 3._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20.

Work 2 patterns from No. 2 in 1st d'oyley, 2 patterns from No. 3 in same
d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 4 in same d'oyley, and 1 pattern from No. 5,
2 patterns from No. 6 in same d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 7, 1 pattern
from No. 8; and 1 from No. 10 in same d'oyley, 2 patterns from No. 11 in
1st d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 2 in 2nd d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 3
in same d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 9 in same d'oyley, and 2 from No.
10.

Then 1 pattern in the following manner:--Round 1: Make a chain stitch of
12 stitches, 1 double crochet, 10 long into successive loops, 1 double
crochet, 1 double crochet at the point, and work down the other side to
correspond.

Round 2: 2 long into each loop.

Round 3: 4 chain, miss 2 loops, 1 double crochet into the next, repeat.

Round 4: 1 double crochet into the 1st 4 chain of 3rd round, 5 chain,
repeat.

Work 1 pattern in this way, 1 chain of 14, 1 double crochet into each, 5
chain, 1 double crochet into the last double crochet, turn, 6 double
crochet into the circle, with 3 chain between each, into each 3 chain, 5
long, turn, 1 double crochet between each of the 5 long, with 6 chain
between each double crochet, turn, into the 1st double crochet 1 long, 2
chain, 1 double long, 2 chain, 1 treble long, 2 chain, 1 double long, 2
chain, 1 long all into the same place, 1 double crochet into the 6
chain. Repeat this 5 times more, then work down the 7 of 14, 7 long, and
7 of single crochet. The edging to be the same as in the former
d'oyleys. The 1st round of the edging takes up so much space to write,
that we think it better to leave it to the judgment of the worker. It
will be seen by the engraving when it is necessary to work a double long
or long stitch, or a stitch of single or double crochet, and the number
of chain stitches between must be just sufficient to make the circle
perfect. The best way is to cut a round of blue paper and place them on
it from the engraving, then sew them together, and tack them to the
paper, and work the 1st row of the edging before removing the paper.

[Illustration: 264.--D'Oyley No. 3.]

       *       *       *       *       *

265.--_D'Oyley No. 4._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20.

Work 3 patterns from No. 2 in 1st d'oyley, and 2 from No. 3, 1 pattern
from No. 4, 1 pattern from No. 5 in 1st d'oyley, 2 patterns from No. 6,
and 1 from No. 8 in same d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 2 in 2nd d'oyley,
and 1 leaf from No. 3 in 2nd d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 11 in 2nd
d'oyley, and the following pattern.


No. 1.--Make a chain of 30 stitches, turn, miss 1 loop, 29 double
crochet into successive loops, turn, 1 double crochet, 1 long, 2 double
long, 8 treble long into 4 loops, 8 double long, 9 long, 4 double
crochet, 3 chain, work down the other side to correspond, then 1 double
crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat all round.


No. 2.--Make a chain of 20 stitches, turn, miss 1 loop, 2 double crochet
into successive loops, * 2 chain, miss two loops, 1 long into the next,
repeat from * 3 times more, 2 chain, miss 2 loops, 3 double crochet into
successive loops, 1 double crochet into every loop on both sides. Next
round: * 5 chain, turn, miss 1 loop, 1 double crochet, 3 long, miss 2
loops of the foundation, 1 double crochet, repeat from * at the point,
miss only 1 loop, work 2 patterns of this number.


No. 3.--Make a chain of 36 stitches, turn, miss 2 loops, 2 long, *, 1
chain, 3 long, repeat from * 3 times, 1 double crochet, turn, *, 4
chain, 1 double crochet into the 1st chain stitch, repeat from * 3
times, at the point make 5 chain instead of 4, work down the other side
to correspond, turn, and into each of the 4 chain 1 double crochet, 7
long, and 1 double crochet, at the point 10 long instead of 7, 2 double
crochet down the stem, 1 chain of 28, turn, miss 12 loops, 1 single
crochet, then into the circle 20 long, turn, 1 double crochet, 5 chain,
miss 1 loop, repeat, turn, 1 double crochet into the 5 chain in last
row, 5 chain, repeat, turn, into the 5 chain 1 double crochet, 7 chain,
repeat, turn, into the 7 chain 1 double crochet, 1 long, 7 double long,
1 long, 1 double crochet, repeat, work down the stem, 1 double crochet,
1 long, 4 double long, 1 long, 4 double crochet, 1 chain of 14, turn,
miss 3 loops, 10 long, 1 double crochet, 1 double crochet, turn, 1
double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat, turn, into the 3 chain 1
double crochet, 5 long, 1 double crochet, repeat, work down the stem in
double crochet.


[Illustration: 165.--D'Oyley No. 4.]

No. 4.--Make a chain of 6 stitches, and unite it. Round 1: Into the
circle 16 long. Round 2: 1 double crochet into each loop, 3 chain after
each. Round 3: 1 double crochet into the 3 chain, 3 chain, repeat. Round
4: 4 long into the 3 chain, repeat. Round 5: 1 double crochet, make 3
chain, miss 1 loop, repeat. *, for the leaves, 1 chain of 22, turn, 4
double crochet, 1 long, 9 double long, 1 long, 1 double crochet, 1 chain
to cross the stem, on the other side 1 double crochet, 1 long, 9 double
long, 1 long, 4 double crochet, 2 double crochet at the point, work down
the other side to correspond, 2 double crochet down the stem, 1 chain of
8, repeat from *, 1 chain of 12, and unite it to the 3 chain of the
round, turn, 12 double crochet down the stem, work another leaf in the
same manner, then work a stem of 8, and make another leaf the same as
before, finish with a stem of 8.


No. 5.--Round 1: Make a chain of 12 stitches, and unite it, 1 double
crochet, miss 3 loops, 12 chain, repeat twice more. Round 2: Into the 12
chain 2 double crochet, 13 long, 2 double crochet, repeat. Round 3: 2
double crochet into successive loops, 13 long into successive loops, 2
double crochet into successive loops, repeat. Round 4: 1 long, 5 chain,
miss 3 loops, repeat. Round 5: Into the 5 chain 2 double crochet, 5
long, 2 double crochet, repeat.


No. 6.--Make a chain of 11 stitches, and unite it. Round 1: 2 double
crochet into each loop. Round 2: 1 double crochet into each loop. Round
3: 2 double crochet into 1 loop, 1 into the next, repeat. Round 4: 1
long, 5 chain, miss 2 loops, repeat. Round 5: Into the 5 chain 3 double
crochet, 3 chain, 1 single crochet into the last double crochet, 3 more
of double crochet into the same place, 4 chain, repeat. Round 6: 1
long into the 4 chain, 7 chain, repeat. Round 7: Into the 7 chain 4
double crochet, 3 chain, 1 single crochet into the last double crochet,
4 more double crochet into the same place, 4 chain, repeat. When all
these pieces are done sew them together, as shown in the engraving, and
work the edging to correspond with the other d'oyleys.

       *       *       *       *       *

266.--_D'Oyley No. 5._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20; and
1 skein of fine embroidery cotton, by the same makers.

Pattern No. 1.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 double crochet, 7 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat 5 times more.

Round 2: Into the 7 chain 11 stitches of double crochet, repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet into the 1st of the 11, 9 chain, miss 5 loops,
1 double crochet into the next, 9 chain, repeat.

Round 4: Into the 9 chain 13 double crochet, repeat.

Round 5: 1 double crochet into the 1st of the 13, 7 chain, miss 3 loops,
repeat.

Round 6: 5 double crochet into the 7 chain, and repeat.


No. 2.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 double crochet, 5 chain, repeat 7 times more.

Round 2: 6 chain, miss the 1st, then work into successive loops 2 double
crochet and 3 long, 1 double crochet into the 1 double crochet in 1st
round, repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet into the 1 in 1st round, 5 chain, and repeat.

Round 4: 7 chain, miss the 1st, and work into successive loops 2 double
crochet, 3 long, 1 double long, 1 double crochet into the 5 chain,
repeat.

Round 5: 1 double crochet into the 1 in the 3rd round, 5 chain, repeat.

Round 6: Same as 4th.

Round 7: 1 double crochet into the 1 in 5th round, 6 chain, repeat.

Round 8: 8 chain, miss the 1st, and work into successive loops 2 double
crochet, 3 long, 2 double long.

Round 9: Same as 7th. Round 10: Same as 8th. Two of these patterns will
be required for this d'oyley.

[Illustration: 266.--D'Oyley No. 5.]


No. 3.--Make a chain of 16, and unite it.

Round 1: 2 double crochet into 1 loop, 1 double crochet into the next,
repeat.

Round 2: 6 double crochet into successive loops, 5 chain, 1 single
crochet into the last double crochet, repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet into the 3rd of the 6, 13 chain, repeat.

Round 4: 17 double crochet into the 13 chain, repeat.

Round 5: 1 long and 1 chain alternately, missing 1 loop between each.

Round 6: 1 double crochet into the 1 chain, 1 chain, 1 double crochet
into the next chain, 5 chain, work another double crochet into the same
place, 1 chain, repeat.


No. 4.--Make a chain of 14 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 double crochet, 7 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat 6 times more.

Round 2: 5 double crochet into the 7 chain, repeat.

Round 3: 8 chain, miss the 1st, and work into successive loops 2 double
crochet, 3 long, and 2 double long, 1 double crochet into the last of
the 5 double crochet, repeat.

Round 4: 1 double crochet at the top of the point, 4 chain, miss 1 loop,
1 double crochet into the next, 4 chain, miss 2 loops, 1 double crochet
into the next, 4 chain, 1 double crochet into the 1 in last round. Work
the other side of the point to correspond. Two of these patterns will be
required for this d'oyley.


No. 5.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 2 double crochet into each loop.

Round 2: 2 double crochet into 1 loop, 1 into the next, repeat.

Round 3: 8 chain, miss the 1st, and work into successive loops, 5 double
crochet and 2 long, miss 1 of the last round, work 4 double crochet into
successive loops, repeat 3 times more, at the end of the round work 4
more double crochet.

Round 4: 1 double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat all, round the 4
points and 2 stitches beyond the 4th, 7 chain, 1 double crochet into
each of the 7, finish the round with 3 chain and 1 double crochet as
before.


No. 6.--Make a chain of 5 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 double crochet, 5 chain, repeat 4 times more.

Round 2: Into the 5 chain 1 double crochet, 3 chain, repeat till 5
double crochet are done, repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet into the 1 in 1st round, 7 chain, repeat.

Round 4: Same as 2nd.

Round 5: 1 double crochet into the 1 in 3rd round, 7 chain, repeat.

Round 6: Same as 2nd.

Round 7: Same as 5th.

Round 8: Same as 2nd, only 4 chain instead of 3.

Round 9: 1 double crochet into the 1 in 7th round, 8 chain, repeat.

Round 10: The same as 8th, only making 5 chain instead of 4. Four of
these patterns will be required for this d'oyley.


No. 7.--Make a chain of 6 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 double crochet, 7 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat twice more.

Round 2: Into the 7 chain 2 double crochet, 7 long, 2 double crochet,
repeat.

Round 3: 1 double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat, 11 chain, work
2 more leaves in the same way, 1 double crochet into the 3 chain, 4
chain, repeat round 2 sides of the leaf, 3 chain, repeat the stitch of
double crochet and 4 chain round 2 sides of each leaf, joining them with
3 chain. Two of these patterns will be required for this d'oyley.


No. 8.--1st row: Make a chain of 14 stitches, miss the 1st, and work
into successive loops 5 double crochet, 5 long, 3 double long, turn. 2nd
row: 2 double long into each of the 3, 9 long into successive loops, 5
long into the double crochet at the point of the leaf, 9 long into
successive loops, 6 double long into the next 2 loops, 9 double long
into the end of the 1st row, unite the last to the first double long in
2nd row. 3rd row: 1 double crochet, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat. No
loop to be missed at the point, then work with the embroidery cotton a
smaller leaf on it in satin stitch, raising it first with the cotton.


No. 9.--Make a chain of 10 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 20 long into the circle.

Round 2: 1 double crochet, taking both sides of the loop, 9 chain, miss
1 loop, repeat.

Round 3: Double crochet into the centre of the 9 chain, 7 chain, repeat.

Round 4: Into the 7 chain of last row 1 double crochet, 1 long, 3
double long, 1 long, 1 double crochet, repeat, then work 2 patterns from
No. 2 in 1st d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 3, 2 patterns with 3 leaves
from No. 3 in 1st d'oyley, 2 patterns with 2 leaves, and 1 pattern with
1 leaf, work 3 patterns from No. 6 in 1st d'oyley.

When all these patterns are done join them as shown in the engraving,
and work the edging as directed in the former d'oyleys.

       *       *       *       *       *

267.--_D'Oyley No. 6_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20.


Pattern No. 1.--Make a chain of 7 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 2 double crochet into each loop.

Round 2: 2 double crochet into 1 loop, and 1 into the next, repeat.

Round 3: Increase to 30 double crochet.

Round 4: 4 chain, 1 single crochet into the 1st chain, 5 double crochet,
and repeat 5 times more.

Round 5: 1 double crochet into the centre one of the 5 in last round, 11
chain, repeat.

Round 6: 1 double crochet into every loop.

Round 7: 5 chain, 1 single crochet into the 1st, 12 double crochet, and
repeat.

Round 8: 1 double crochet into the 6th of the 12, 15 chain, repeat.

Round 9: 1 double crochet into every loop.

Round 10: 7 chain, miss the 1st, and work into successive loops 1 double
crochet, 2 long, and 3 double long, miss 5 loops of the last round, work
1 double crochet, repeat.

Round 11: 1 double crochet over the 1 in last round, miss 1 loop, 1
double crochet into the next, *, 3 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat from * 4
times more, repeat from the beginning of the row.


No. 2.--Make a chain of 20 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 30 double crochet into the circle.

Round 2: 1 double crochet, 13 chain, miss 5 loops, repeat.

Round 3: 17 double crochet into the 13 chain, repeat.

Round 4: 1 long, 5 chain, 1 single crochet into the 2nd of the 5 chain,
miss 1 loop, repeat. Four patterns of this number will be required for
this d'oyley.

[Illustration: 267.--D'Oyley No. 6.]


No. 3.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 double crochet, 11 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat 3 times more.

Round 2: Into the 11 chain, *, 3 double crochet, 5 chain, 1 single
crochet into the 1st chain, repeat from * twice more, 3 more double
crochet, repeat from the beginning of the row.


No. 4.--Make a chain of 6, and unite it.

Round 1: 1 long, 4 chain, repeat 5 times more.

Round 2: Into the 4 chain in last row 1 long, 4 chain, work another long
into the same place, 2 chain, repeat.

Round 3: Into the 2 chain 3 double crochet, into the 4 chain 1 double
crochet, 11 chain, work another double crochet into the same place,
repeat.

Round 4: Into the 11 chain 3 double crochet, 5 chain, 1 single crochet
into the 1st of the 5 chain, 3 double crochet, 7 chain, 1 single crochet
into the 1st of the 7, 3 double crochet, 5 chain, 1 single crochet into
the 1st of the 5 chain, 3 double crochet, 2 chain, 1 double crochet into
the centre one of the 3 in last round, 2 chain, repeat; then work 2
patterns from No. 2 in 1st d'oyley, 1 pattern from No. 3, 2 patterns
from No. 4, 3 from No. 6, and 1 each from Nos. 11, 13, and 14 in 1st
d'oyley, 1 pattern from each of Nos. 3 and 4 in 2nd d'oyley, 2 patterns
from No. 2 in 5th d'oyley, and 1 pattern each from Nos. 4 and 6 in the
5th d'oyley. Sew these pieces firmly together as shown in the engraving,
and add the edging as before.

       *       *       *       *       *

268.--_D'Oyley No. 7._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20; and
1 skein of their fine embroidery cotton.


Pattern No. 1.--Make a chain of 16 stitches and unite it.

1st round: 2 double crochet into each loop.

2nd round: 1 double crochet into each loop.

3rd round: 1 double crochet, 9 chain, miss 3 loops, repeat.

4th round: Into the 9 chain 11 double crochet.

5th round: 1 long, 2 chain, miss 2 loops, repeat.

6th round: Into the 2 chain 1 double crochet, 3 chain, 1 single crochet
into the one double crochet, work another double crochet into the 2
chain, 2 double crochet into the next 2 chain, repeat.

7th round: 1 double crochet into the 1st of the 2 in last round, 13
chain, repeat.

8th round: Into the 13 chain 11 double crochet, repeat.


No. 2.--Make a chain of 13 stitches, work 1 double crochet into each,
make a chain of 15 stitches, work 1 double crochet into each, make a
chain of 13 stitches, 1 double crochet into each.

2nd row: 1 double crochet into the end of each of these points, then
work round _both_ sides of these points in double crochet, working twice
into the end of each point.

3rd row: 3 double crochet over the 3 at the beginning of last row, *, 4
chain, single crochet into the 1st of the 4 chain, miss 1 loop, work a
long stitch into the next, repeat from * all round, at the beginning and
end of the 3rd point miss 2 loops instead of 1, then work a stitch of
double crochet into the 1st of the 3, 6 chain, miss the 1st, work into
successive loops 2 long and 3 double crochet, 1 double crochet into the
last of the 3. This completes the pattern.


No. 3.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, and unite it. 1st round: 2 double
crochet into each loop.

2nd round: 1 double crochet into 1 loop, 2 double crochet into the next,
repeat.

3rd round: 2 double crochet into successive loops, 2 double crochet into
the next, repeat.

4th round: 11 double crochet into successive loops, *, 9 chain, miss 2
loops, 1 double crochet into the next, repeat from *.

5th round: 11 double crochet over the 11 in last round, work into the 9
chain 5 double crochet, 5 chain, 1 single crochet into the 1st of the
chain, 5 more double crochet into the same place, repeat.

6th round: 13 double crochet over the 11 in last round, *, 15 chain, 1
double crochet over the 1st of the 5 in last round, repeat from *.

7th round: 13 double crochet over the 13 in last round, *, work into the
15 chain 8 double crochet, 5 chain, work a stitch of single crochet into
the 1st of the 5, 8 double crochet into the same place, repeat from *.
This completes the pattern. Then work a circle in satin stitch on the
plain part of the pattern with the Fine Embroidery Cotton. Two of these
patterns will be required for this d'oyley.

[Illustration: 268.--D'Oyley No. 7.]


No. 4.--Make a chain of 16 stitches, and unite it. * make a chain of 10
stitches, miss the 1st, and work into successive loops 3 double crochet,
3 long, and 3 double long, unite the last double long to the 4th of the
16 chain in the circle, repeat from * 3 times more, *, work in single
crochet to the top of the point and down 6 stitches of the other side,
then make a chain of 8 stitches, miss the 1st, work into successive
loops 3 stitches of double crochet, 2 long, and 2 double long, unite the
last to the 3rd of the next point, and repeat from * 3 times more. Three
of these patterns will be required for this d'oyley. Work 2 patterns
from No. 2 in the 1st d'oyley, work 2 patterns from No. 3 in the same
d'oyley, work 1 pattern from No. 5, and 1 from No. 6 in 1st d'oyley,
work 2 patterns with 1 leaf from No. 3 in 1st d'oyley, and 1 pattern
with 2 leaves, work 2 patterns from No. 3 in the 5th d'oyley, and 1
pattern from No. 4 in the same d'oyley, and 1 from No. 6, work 6
patterns from No. 3 in the 6th d'oyley, and 1 pattern from No. 4 in the
same d'oyley, work 1 pattern from No. 2 in 6th d'oyley. Join these
pieces as before, and add the same edging.

       *       *       *       *       *

269.--_D'Oyley No. 8_

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20; and
1 skein of their fine embroidery cotton.


Pattern No. 1.--Make a chain of 9 stitches, work a stitch of double
crochet into each of the 8 1st, work 2 into the 9th, work down the other
side of the chain to correspond, and unite it.

2nd round: *, Work 1 long, make 4 chain, 1 single crochet into the 1st
of the 4 chain, miss 1 loop, and repeat from *. No loop to be missed at
the point. When this round is finished, make 10 chain, miss the 1st, and
work into successive loops 2 long, and 7 of double crochet, then make 15
chain, unite to the 7th, and work into the circle 1 double crochet, make
5 chain, repeat 5 times more.

2nd round: Work into the 5 chain 1 double crochet, 3 long, and 1 of
double crochet, repeat.

3rd round: Work 1 double crochet, make 3 chain, miss 1 loop, and repeat.
Three of these patterns are required for this d'oyley.

[Illustration: 269.--D'Oyley No. 8.]


No. 2.--Make a chain of 6 stitches. 1st round: Work 2 double crochet
into each loop.

2nd round: Work 1 double crochet, make 9 chain, miss 1 loop, repeat.

3rd round: Work into the 9 chain 1 long, make 1 chain, work another 1
long into the same place, make 1 chain, work a third 1 long into the
same place, make 7 chain, and repeat.

4th round: Work into the centre of 3 long 2 long, make 5 chain, work 2
more long into the same place, make 5 chain, work into the centre of the
7 chain 1 double crochet, make 3 chain, work another of double crochet
into the same place, make 5 chain, and repeat. Two of these patterns
will be required for this d'oyley. Work 1 pattern from No. 2 in 1st
d'oyley, work 1 pattern from Nos. 3, 4, and 6, work 1 pattern with 3
leaves from No. 3 in 1st d'oyley, and 2 with only 1 leaf, work 1 pattern
from each of Nos. 13 and 14 in 1st d'oyley, work 1 pattern from 2 in 5th
d'oyley, and 1 from No. 4 in the same d'oyley, work 2 patterns from No.
6 in 5th d'oyley, work 3 patterns from No. 3 in 6th d'oyley, and 2 from
No. 4 in the same d'oyley, work 1 pattern from No. 1 in 7th d'oyley,
work 2 patterns from No. 3, and 1 pattern from No. 4 in 7th d'oyley,
then sew them together as before.

       *       *       *       *       *

270.--_D'Oyley No. 9_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20.


Pattern No. 1--Make a chain of 10 stitches, and unite ir.

1st round: Work into the circle 1 long, make 3 chain, repeat 11 times
more.

2nd round: Work 1 double crochet into every loop.

3rd round: *, Make 11 chain, turn, miss 1 loop, work 10 double crochet
down the chain, miss 1 loop, work 7 double crochet and repeat from * 5
times more.

4th round: Work 1 double crochet, beginning on the 1st of the 10, make 5
chain, miss 3 loops, work 1 double crochet, make 5 chain, miss 3 loops,
work 1 double crochet, make 5 chain, work 1 double crochet into the
point, work down the other side to correspond, make 2 chain, miss 3
loops, work 1 double crochet, make 2 chain, miss 3 loops, and repeat.

5th round: Work into each of the 5 chain 1 double crochet, 5 long
stitches, and 1 double crochet.


No. 2.--Make a chain of 20 stitches, and unite it.

1st round: Work a stitch of double crochet into 1 loop, work 2 double
crochet into the next, repeat.

2nd round: * Work 3 double crochet, make 5 chain, work 1 single crochet
into the 1st of the 5 chain, repeat from * 9 times more, work 2 double
crochet.

3rd round: * Make 21 chain stitches, work 1 double crochet in the centre
one of the 3, turn, work 7 double crochet into the 21 chain, make 5
chain, work 1 single crochet into the 1st of the 5 chain, work 7 double
crochet into the 21 chain, repeat from * 8 times more.

4th round: Work 15 double crochet into each loop of 21 chain, above the
last 7 work 20 double crochet into the last loop of 21, make 5 chain,
turn, work 1 single crochet into the last of the 5 chain, 7 double
crochet, make 4 chain.

5th round: Work 19 double crochet, beginning on the 1st of the 7 in the
1st loop of 21 chain, * make 6 chain, turn, miss 1 loop, work into
successive loops a stitch of double, 3 long, 1 double long, then miss 4
double crochet stitches, work 5 double crochet into successive loops,
make 5 chain, 1 single crochet into the 1st of the 5 chain, miss 1 loop,
5 double crochet into successive loops, repeat from * 8 times more, then
work 12 double crochet. Two of these patterns will be required for this
d'oyley.

[Illustration: 270.--D'Oyley No. 9.]


No. 3.--Make a chain of 8 stitches, and unite it.

1st round: Work into the circle 1 long, make 3 chain, repeat 9 times
more.

2nd round: Work into the 3 chain 1 double crochet, make 17 chain, work
another stitch of double crochet into the same place, make 1 chain, work
1 double crochet into the next 3 chain, make 1 chain, and repeat.

3rd round: Work into the 17 chain 20 double crochet, work 1 double
crochet into the 1 chain, make 1 chain, work 1 double crochet into the
next 1 chain, and repeat.

4th round: Work a stitch of double crochet into the 1 chain in last
round, * work 5 double crochet into successive loops, beginning on the
1st of the 20, make 5 chain, work 1 single crochet into the 1st of the
5, repeat from * twice more, then work 5 double crochet into successive
loops, and repeat from the beginning of the round. Two of these patterns
will be required for this d'oyley.


No. 4.--Make 21 chain and unite it, make a chain of 27 and unite it,
make a chain of 21 and unite it. 1st round: Work in the 21 chain 25
stitches of double crochet, work into the 27 chain 31 double crochet,
work into the 21 chain 25 double crochet. 2nd round: Work 3 stitches of
double crochet into successive loops, make 5 chain, work 1 single
crochet into the 1st of the 5 chain, repeat this 6 times more, then work
3 double crochet and repeat from the beginning in the centre loop,
repeat this 9 times instead of 7. Two of these are required for this
d'oyley.


No. 5.--Make a chain of 44 stitches, work 1 double crochet into each,
turn, make 21 chain, work 1 double crochet into the 4th chain on the
other side, * make 21 chain, miss 3 loops, work 1 double crochet into
the next, repeat from * 9 times more, work 1 single crochet into the end
loop, work 44 double crochet into successive loops, work 15 double into
the 1st loop of 21, work 4 double crochet into each loop of 21, and 15
into the end one, then * work 2 double crochet, make 3 chain, work 1
single crochet into the 1st of the 3, repeat from * all round.

Work 2 patterns from No. 2 in 1st d'oyley, 1 from No. 3, 2 with 3
leaves, and 2 with 2 leaves, from No. 3 in 1st d'oyley, 2 patterns from
No. 6 in same d'oyley, and 3 patterns from No. 3 in 6th d'oyley, sew
them together as shown in the engraving, and add the edging as before.

       *       *       *       *       *

271.--_D'Oyley No. 10_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton No. 20.

Pattern No. 1.--Make a chain of 19 stitches, turn, miss 5 loops, work 10
double crochet, make 3 chain, miss 3 loops, work 1 long, make 3 chain
stitches, miss 3 loops, work 1 long stitch, make 3 chain stitches, work
a stitch of double crochet into the last loop, then work into the 1st 3
chain on the other side, 1 double crochet, 5 long, work into the next 3
chain 4 long stitches, work 4 long stitches into the next 3 chain
stitches, then work into the 5 chain at the point 8 long stitches, then
work down the other side to correspond, * make 3 chain, miss 1 loop,
work 1 long, make 1 chain, work 1 long stitch into the same place, make
1 chain, work another long stitch into the same place, miss 1 loop, work
1 double crochet, repeat from * 7 times more, then work into the 1st 3
chain 1 double crochet, make 1 chain, work 1 long stitch, * make 1, work
1 double long stitch, repeat from * twice more, make 1 chain, work 1
long; all these stitches are worked into the same 3 chain, then work 1
double crochet into the chain stitch between the 2nd and 3rd long
stitches, repeat this 7 times more; this finishes the leaf; then make 16
chain, and work a second leaf the same as 1st, then work 2 double
crochet down, then make 12 chain, and work a third leaf the same as 1st,
work 14 stitches down the stem, and work a 4th leaf the same as 1st,
work 8 double crochet down the stem, work a 5th leaf the same as 1st,
make a chain of 40 stitches, turn, and work back in double crochet.

[Illustration: 271.--D'Oyley No. 10.]


No. 2.--Make a chain of 10 stitches, and unite it, *, work a stitch of
double crochet into the circle, make 13 chain, and repeat from * five
times more, then work 17 stitches into each of the 13 chain, then work 2
stitches of double crochet, beginning on the second of the 13, *, make 5
chain stitches, and work a stitch of single crochet into the 1st of the
5 chain, then work 2 stitches of double crochet, and repeat from * 5
times more; for the stem make a chain of 30 stitches, turn, * work 5
stitches of double crochet, make 5 chain, turn, and work a stitch of
single crochet into the 1st, repeat from * 4 times more, then work down
the other side to correspond; then work 1 pattern from No. 2 in 1st
d'oyley, and 2 from No. 3, 2 with only two leaves, and 2 from No. 6 in
the same d'oyley; work 1 pattern from No. 6 in 5th d'oyley, and 3 from
No. 3 in 6th d'oyley; work 1 pattern from No. 2 in 9th d'oyley, and 1
from No. 3; work 3 patterns from No. 4 in the same d'oyley, sew the
pieces together as before, and work the edging.

       *       *       *       *       *

272 _and_ 273.--_Work-Basket in Straw and Silk Crochet-Work_.

Materials: Straw; brown floss silk; brown ribbon, 1-1/4 inch wide; small
glass beads; a piece of bamboo cane.

This basket has a cover formed of two pieces. It can be employed for
many things, and is formed entirely of crochet-work with brown silk
over straw. A ruche trimmed with beads and bows of brown silk ribbon
form the trimming of the basket. The straws over which you crochet must
be damp, so as not to be stiff. They should be of unequal length, and
when you join the two ends of two straws together, try to hide the
beginning with the other straws. Begin the basket in the centre of the
bottom part with 46 stitches; then work 9 rounds on either side of this
first row, working alternately 1 double stitch, 1 or 2 chain stitches,
the double stitch in the chain stitch of the preceding round, the last
round over wire.

[Illustration: 273.--Bottom of Work Basket (272).]

It is necessary to increase regularly in all the rounds to keep the work
flat. When you have finished the bottom begin the border of the basket,
which is worked of the same piece with it, and consists of 11 rounds.

It is worked in the same way as the bottom, the first 2 rounds without
increasing the number of stitches, but in the following 9 rounds
increase 2 double stitches at both ends, in order that the edge may be a
little wider in the upper part. In the last round add a piece of wire to
the straws.

[Illustration: 272.--Work Basket in Straw and Crochet.]

The cover of the basket is formed of two pieces. Begin in the middle
with 28 stitches; crochet each half in rows forming a half circle,
working backwards and forwards; at the beginning of each row turn the
straws, and take care that the rows which are finished form a straight
line. Each half of the cover requires 9 rows; the last one is worked
over wire. The two halves are united at the straight sides by a brown
silk ribbon 1-1/4 inch wide, which is sewed on underneath, and which
forms a sort of hinge; sew on also a piece of wire covered with brown
silk, so as to make the hinge stronger. Form the handle with a piece of
bamboo cane 23 inches long, and covered with straws; work over it in
long stitches of brown silk, and let it go down to the bottom of the
basket; then sew the cover on the handle with the brown ribbon, which
forms the two parts. Trim the basket with a ruche of double box pleats,
ornamented with glass beads and with bows of brown silk ribbon.

       *       *       *       *       *

274 _and_ 275.--_Two Crochet Borders_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton Nos. 30 and 80.

No. 274.--Crochet cotton of two sizes is used for this border (No. 30
and No. 80); it is begun in the centre by a chain of stitches of the
length required.

[Illustration: 274.--Crochet Border.]

1st row: 1 double in each stitch of the chain.

2nd row: Turn and work on the opposite side of the chain, * 1 double, 11
chain, miss 7. Repeat from *. 3rd row: * 1 double on the 1st loop of
chain, 2 chain, 1 double in the centre of the 7 stitches which are under
the 1st loop of chain, 2 chain, 1 double on the same loop, 5 chain.
Repeat from *.

4th row: * 1 double in the centre of the 1st loop of chain, 3 chain, 1
treble in the 1st, but before you complete the treble stitch make 1
chain. Repeat from *. This row completes the upper half of the border.
The lower half is worked over the 1st row of plain double crochet.

5th row: 1 double in each of the first 5 stitches, 15 chain, miss 9, 1
double, come back over the loop of chain and work 1 double in each
stitch, come back again and work 6 small points, each made thus: 5
chain, 1 double in the 4th, and 1 treble in each of the 3 others, 1
double over the round scallop. When you have worked the 6 small points
repeat from *, but always join the 1st point of one scallop to the last
point of the next scallop. The pattern inside the scallops is worked in
2 rows with fine cotton. (See illustration.)

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 275.--Crochet Border.]

No. 275.--The border is begun above the pointed scallops, filled up with
lace stitches, by making alternately 3 chain, 1 purl (_i.e._, 5 chain
and 1 slip stitch in the 1st). When the chain is long enough, turn and
work the 1st row: Alternately 7 chain, 1 double in the centre stitch
between the 2 purl.

2nd row: Turn, work 1 double in the centre of the 1st loop of 7 chain, 1
chain, 1 purl, 1 chain, 1 double in the centre of next loop, and so on.

The 3rd row (which is the last) is worked on the opposite side of the
chain with purl. * In each of the 8 first stitches work 1 double, make
12 chain, miss the 4 last of the 8 double just worked, and work 1 double
in the 5th, come back over the loop of chain, and work 7 small points
over it. For each point make 3 chain, work 1 double in the 2nd, 1 treble
in the 1st of the 3 chain, 1 double upon the loop of chain. Repeat from
* 6 times more.

In the following scallops always fasten the first point of one scallop
to the last point of the preceding scallop. When this row is completed
fill up the inner part of each scallop with a network of fine thread,
joining the threads at all the places where they cross each other by 2
or 3 stitches with a sewing needle.

[Illustration: 275.--Crochet Border.]

       *       *       *       *       *

276.--_Crochet Antimacassar_.

Materials: 18 reels of Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Boar's Head cotton
No. 10.

[Illustration: 276.--Crochet Antimacassar.]

This pattern can be adapted for a round couvrette or a square one, and
is also pretty done in silk for a sofa cushion. Make a chain of 4
stitches, and unite it.

1st round: Work into 1 loop a long stitch, make 1 chain stitch, work
another long stitch into the same place, make 1 chain, repeat.

2nd round: 3 long stitches into 1 loop, make 2 chain stitches, miss 1
loop, and repeat.

3rd round: 1 double crochet into the 2 chain in last round, make 7
chain, and repeat.

4th round: Into the 7 chain 2 double crochet, 5 long stitches, and 2
more double crochet, and repeat.

5th round: 1 long stitch into the 1st double crochet in last round, make
9 chain, and repeat. 6th round: Into the 9 chain 2 double crochet, *
make 4 chain, work 2 double crochet, repeat from * 3 times more, make 5
chain, work a stitch of single crochet into the 2nd of the 5, make 1
chain stitch, and repeat from the beginning of the round. 7th round: 1
long stitch into the loop formed with the 5 chain, make 12 chain, and
repeat. 8th round: Into the 12 chain 2 double crochet into successive
loops, make 4 chain, work 1 double crochet into each of the 2 next
loops, make 1 chain, work into the 6th loop 1 double crochet, 5 long
stitches, and another double crochet, make 1 chain, miss 1 loop, work 2
double crochet into successive loops, make 4 chain, work 1 double
crochet into each of the 2 next, make 5 chain, and repeat. This
completes the circle. 120 circles sewn together like the engraving will
make a good-sized couvrette, 12 in the length, and 10 in the width. If a
round couvrette is wished, work 1 circle for the centre larger than the
others; this can be done by repeating the 5th and 6th rounds, then sew 8
circles round the centre one, and increase the number of circles in each
row till you have made it the size you wish. For the square one, tassels
are required for the end and sides; these are made by winding the cotton
over a cardboard 4 inches deep about 80 times, then twist 8 threads of
the cotton into a cord, cut the cotton wound on the cardboard at one
end, make 2 inches of the cord into a loop and tie it firmly with the
middle of the tassel, then turn it, tie a thread tightly round, about an
inch below the cord, and net over the head; 40 of these tassels will be
sufficient.

       *       *       *       *       *

277.--_Crochet Insertion_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 40.

[Illustration: 277.--Crochet Insertion.]

The patterns of this insertion are worked in a row, and always two
opposite circles at a time. Make a foundation chain of 16 stitches, join
them into a circle, then work a 2nd circle consisting again of 16 chain
stitches. Work round this circle 24 double stitches, and 24 double round
the 1st circle; after the last stitch begin again at the 2nd circle, and
work 10 chain scallops as follows:--3 double in the next 3 stitches, * 5
chain, 2 double in the next 2 stitches, repeat 8 times more, 3 double in
the last 3 stitches; work in the same manner round the other circle. To
get to the next pattern, work 4 slip stitches between the 2 circles in
the middle of the just-completed pattern, leaving the cotton under the
work and drawing it through the stitch upwards through the loop on the
needle; 7 chain stitches, and then 2 circles like those just described,
and so on.

       *       *       *       *       *

278 _and_ 279.--_Tobacco Pouch in Crochet Work_.

Materials: Black purse silk; crimson ditto; gold thread.

The pouch is begun at the bottom, in the centre of the star.

With crimson silk make a chain of 3 stitches, and join it into a
circle. Work 4 rounds of double crochet, 2 stitches in each stitch.

5th round: 2 crimson stitches, 1 gold stitch, and so on.

6th round: All gold stitches.

7th round: 2 crimson stitches, 2 gold, and so on.

8th round: All crimson stitches.

9th round: 3 crimson stitches, 2 gold, &c.

10th round: Similar to the preceding.

[Illustration: 278.--Star for Tobacco Pouch, No. 279.]

11th round: 4 gold stitches, 3 crimson, &c.

12th round: 4 gold stitches, 2 black stitches over the 2 centre gold
stitches of preceding round, &c.

13th round: 3 gold stitches, 4 black stitches, &c.

14th round: 1 gold stitch, 6 black stitches, &c.

15th round: 3 gold stitches, 4 black stitches, &c.

16th round: 4 gold stitches, 2 black stitches, &c.

17th round: 4 gold stitches, 2 over the black stitches of preceding
round, and 1 on either side, 4 crimson stitches, &c.

18th round: 2 gold stitches over the centre ones of preceding round, 7
crimson stitches, &c.

Now work 4 plain crimson rounds, and begin the pattern from No. 279. The
centre is crimson, and the pattern is black and gold. The border round
the top is of the same colours.

[Illustration: 279.--Tobacco Pouch.]

Complete the work by 2 rounds of open treble crochet, and 1 round of
gold scallops.

In the open rounds pass a double cord of black silk, finished off with
small balls of black silk gimp and gold; and on either side of the pouch
fasten one of these same balls with two tassels, one crimson and one
black. The pouch is lined with white kid.

       *       *       *       *       *

280 _and_ 281.--_Crochet Rosettes_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 4, 24, or
40.

These rosettes are suitable for trimming cuffs, collars, and bodices, or
for making couvrettes, according to the size of the cotton with which
they are worked.

[Illustration: 280.--Crochet Rosette.]

280.--Make a foundation chain of 22 chain; join them into a circle and
work the 1st round; 44 double.

2nd round: * 7 chain, missing 3 stitches of the preceding round under
them, 1 double; repeat 10 times more from *.

3rd round: 1 slip stitch in the first 4 stitches of the next scallop, *
5 chain, miss the last and work back on the other 4, 1 double, 1 treble,
1 long treble, 1 double long treble (throw the cotton 3 times round the
needle), 1 slip stitch in the middle stitch of the next scallop; repeat
10 times more from *. Work a wheel in the centre of the rosette, which
is ornamented with a circle of chain stitch, as can be seen in
illustration; take up one thread of the wheel with every other chain
stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 281.--Crochet Rosette.]

281.--Begin the rosette with a leaf-like pattern in the centre, and work
the 1st row: * 11 chain, miss the last, work back over the following 8
stitches, 1 double, 1 treble, 2 long treble, 1 double long treble, 2
long treble, 1 treble, 1 double in the upper part of the chain stitch
before the last, 1 slip stitch in the lower part of the same stitch. The
first leaf of the middle pattern is then completed; repeat 6 times more
from *. Join the first and last leaves together by working 1 slip stitch
in the 1st of the 11 chain stitch. 2nd round: (Fasten on the cotton
afresh), 1 slip stitch in the point of each leaf, 12 chain between. 3rd
round: 24 double in each scallop. The rosette is then completed.

       *       *       *       *       *

282.--_Crochet Trimming, with Embroidered Flowers worked in Appliqué,
and Velvet Ribbon_.

[Illustration: 282.--Crochet Trimming, with Embroidered Flowers worked
in Appliqué and Velvet Ribbon.]

This trimming consists of 2 strips of crochet insertion, ornamented with
embroidery patterns worked in appliqué, and velvet ribbon drawn through.
They are worked the long way with fine crochet cotton. Begin on a
sufficiently long foundation chain of stitches which can be divided by
20, and work the 1st row: 1 chain, * 5 double, on the first 5 stitches
of the foundation, 1 leaf, as follows:--10 chain, without reckoning the
loop left on the needle, 1 extra long treble (for which the cotton is
wound 5 times round the needle) in the second of the 10 chain, a similar
treble in the first, then cast off the 2 treble stitches together, wind
the cotton once round the needle, and cast off the last loop with the
loop left on the needle. Miss under the leaf 15 stitches of the
foundation, and repeat from *.

2nd row: 5 double on the 5 double of the preceding row, inserting the
needle in the whole stitches, 15 chain stitches between.

3rd row: * 5 double in the first 5 double of the preceding row, 7 chain,
1 slip stitch in every other stitch of the next scallop of the preceding
row, 7 chain between, 7 chain stitches; repeat from *.

4th row: * 1 double in the middle of the 5 double of the preceding row,
3 chain, 1 slip stitch in the middle stitch of each of the 8 scallops,
consisting of 7 chain in the preceding row, 3 chain between, 3 chain;
repeat from *. These 2 last rows (the third and fourth) are repeated on
the other side of the foundation chain.

When the 2 strips of insertion are completed, sew them together so that
2 opposite scallops meet, and ornament them with the embroidery patterns
and velvet ribbon.

       *       *       *       *       *

283.--_Crochet Insertion_.

This pretty insertion is very suitable for cerceaunette covers or
pillow-cases, and should be worked with middle-sized cotton. If the
insertion is used for anything but a pillowcase, omit the lower border
on which the button-holes are made. Begin the insertion in the middle of
one of the star-like figures, with a foundation chain of 9 stitches;
join them into a circle by making 1 slip stitch, and crochet thus:--*
10 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 5th of these chain; this forms 1 purl; 4
chain, 1 slip stitch in the circle, repeat from * 5 times more. Work 4
slip stitches in the next 4 chain, then crochet * in the next purl; 5
double divided by 5 chain, 4 chain, repeat 5 times from *. Fasten the
thread after having fastened the last 4 chain-stitches with a slip
stitch to the 1st double stitch of this round. This completes the
star-like figure. Work on one side of these figures the following
rows:--

1st row: * 1 treble in the 2nd scallop of the four placed together, 3
chain, 1 double in the next scallop, 3 chain, 1 treble in the last of
the 4 scallops, 3 chain, 1 treble in the 1st scallop of the following 4
placed together, 3 chain, 1 double in the next 2nd scallop, 3 chain, 1
treble in the 3rd scallop, 3 chain. Repeat from *.

2nd row: 3 treble in the 1st stitch of the preceding row, * miss 3
stitches, 3 treble in the 4th following stitch. Repeat from *.

3rd row: * 3 treble cast off together as one stitch on the next 3
stitches of the preceding row, 2 chain. Repeat from *.

4th row: 1 double on the next stitch of the preceding row, * 4 chain, 1
slip stitch in the 3 double; this forms 1 purl; 3 double on the next 3
stitches of the preceding row. Repeat from *. After having worked these
four rows likewise on the other side of the star figures, work over the
last the following 5 rows for the button-holes:--

1st row: 1 double in the next purl, * 2 chain, 1 double in the next
purl. Repeat from *.

2nd row: 1 double in each stitch of the preceding row.

3rd row: Alternately 11 double, 7 chain, under which miss 7 stitches.
4th row: Like the 2nd row.

5th row; * 3 double on the next 3 double of the preceding row, 1 purl (4
chain, 1 slip stitch in the last double stitch). Repeat from *.

[Illustration: 283.--Crochet Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

284.--_Crochet Insertion_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 30.

This insertion is worked in our pattern with fine crochet cotton on a
double foundation chain. For the outer edge work a row of purl stitches
as follows:--1 double in the 1st stitch, * 1 chain, 1 purl, consisting
of 5 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 1st 2 chain, 1 double in the next
stitch but 2; repeat from *. The open-work centre consists of 6 rows of
scallops; the 1st of these rows is worked on the other side of the
foundation chain; 1 double in the middle stitch of every scallop, 5
chain between, then 1 row of slip stitches, and finally a row of purl
stitches like the 1st row of the insertion. For the raised flowers,
which are fastened over the grounding at unequal distances, * make a
foundation chain of 10 stitches, fasten it on over the grounding from
illustration by taking the needle out of the loop, inserting it into the
1 chain of the grounding, and drawing the loop through; miss the last of
the 10 chain, and work back over the others; 1 slip stitch, 1 double, 1
long double, 3 treble, 1 long double, 1 double, 1 slip stitch, then 1
slip stitch in the 1st stitch, * 9 chain, missing 5 stitches under them,
1 double in the 6th stitch; repeat from *. Each following row consists
of 1 double in the middle stitch of every scallop of the preceding row,
9 chain between. Then work the 1st row of the border on the other side
of the insertion; 1 double in the 1st stitch of the foundation,
inserting the needle into the back part of the stitch; repeat 8 times
more from *, and the flower is completed.

[Illustration: 284.--Crochet Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

285.--_Crochet Garter_.

Materials: Grey thread of medium size; fine red wool; fine round white
elastic cord; a pearl button.

This garter is worked in close double crochet, over fine elastic cord;
the border and pattern in red wool, the centre in grey thread.

[Illustration: 285.--Crochet Garter.]

Begin in the middle by a chain of 98 stitches, with red wool; take the
elastic cord, which must always be stretched out a little, and work over
it. Work on both sides of the foundation chain; the pattern is completed
in the course of the two first rounds; the button-hole is made at the
beginning of the first round; make a loop of 21 stitches, and, when you
come to it, work over this loop instead of over the foundation chain.
Increase the number of stitches at either end of the garter, to round it
off. When the second round is completed work two plain grey rounds, then
a plain red one. The last round (grey thread) is composed of alternately
1 double, 1 purl formed of 3 chain, 1 slip stitch in the first, missing
1 stitch under the 1 purl. Sew on a pearl button to correspond with the
button-hole. The garter would be both more elegant and more elastic if
worked entirely in silk.

       *       *       *       *       *

286.--_Crochet Trimming for a Lady's Chemise_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton, and a needle
to match.

This pattern, as can be seen in illustration, is an imitation of old
guipure lace; it is worked all in one piece for the bosom and sleeves,
and is part of one of the shoulder-pieces in full size. Both strips of
rosettes join at that place, and one is continued for the part round the
bosom and the other for the sleeve. In the pattern there are 42 rosettes
round the bosom, and 14 round each sleeve. These rosettes are fastened
one to another in the course of the work. They are made in the following
manner:--Make a chain of 6 stitches, and join it into a ring. 1st round:
8 chain, 1 slip stitch in the 4th chain, which forms a purl (the 3 first
chain are reckoned as 1 treble), 1 chain, 1 treble in the ring, * 5
chain, 1 slip stitch in the 1st to form a purl, 1 chain, 1 treble in the
ring. Repeat 6 times from *. Instead of the last treble, work a slip
stitch to fasten the end of the round to the 3 chain of the beginning,
which thus form 1 treble. 2nd round: 9 chain (the 3 first to be reckoned
as 1 treble), * 1 treble on the 1st treble of last round, 6 chain.
Repeat 6 times from *. 1 slip stitch in the treble at the beginning. 3rd
round: On each scallop of preceding round work 2 double, 1 purl, 2
double, 1 purl, 2 double, 1 purl, 2 double. This completes the rosette.
Each rosette is fastened to the last by joining the 2 middle purl of
both. In the illustration, which is full-size, the purl that are to be
joined to those of another rosette are marked by a cross. The joining
between the part round the bosom and the sleeve is made in the same
manner. The space left between 4 rosettes is filled up with a star
formed of chain stitches, marked in our illustration with an asterisk.
For this star make a chain of 5 stitches, the 1st of which forms the
centre; slip the loop you have on the needle through one of the 8 purl
that are free, make 5 chain, 1 double in the centre stitch. Repeat 7
times from *; then tie the two ends tightly, or sew them together 3 of
these stars are required for each shoulder.

[Illustration: 286.--Crochet Trimming for a Lady's Chemise.]

For the Border.--It is worked at the same time both round the bosom and
sleeves. 1st round: * 1 double in the centre purl of the 1st scallop of
the rosette, which we will call the _first rosette_; 5 chain,
1 double in the centre purl of the 2nd scallop of the same rosette,
4 chain; then work the kind of cross which comes between each rosette
(see illustration). To make this cross throw the cotton 3 times round
the needle, work 1 double treble in the last purl left free of the 1st
rosette, keep the last loop on the needle, throw the cotton twice round
it, and work a double treble in the 1st purl left free in the 2nd
rosette, throw the thread twice round the needle, work 1 treble with the
loop left on the needle, make 2 chain, and work 1 treble in the last
double treble, which completes the cross; make 4 chain. Repeat from * at
each slit on the shoulders; after the last cross make 6 chain, 1 slip
stitch in the 2 purl at the end of the slit, 6 chain to come to the next
space, where a cross is to be made. 2nd round: Work alternately 1
treble, 2 chain, miss 2; at the slit on the shoulders work 6 double over
the 6 chain. The two rounds just explained are also worked round the
upper edge, and finished round the sleeves by the following round:--1
double in one of the spaces in last round, * 6 chain, 1 double in the
2nd of the 6 chain, which forms a purl, 1 chain, 1 double on the next
but one of the last round, 6 chain, 1 double in the 2nd of the 6 chain,
1 chain, 1 double in the next space. Repeat from *. On the upper edge of
the bosom, between the 1st and 2nd rounds of the border, work 1 round of
crosses, but throwing the cotton twice only round the needle, so that
the treble stitches are not double; make 3 chain between each cross.

       *       *       *       *       *




KNITTING.



287.--KNITTING, though considered to be an old-fashioned art, is by no
means so ancient as lacemaking. Knitting has never entirely quitted the
hands of English and German ladies; indeed, among all good housewives of
any civilised country, it is reckoned an indispensable accomplishment.
Knitting schools have been established of late years both in Ireland and
Scotland, and Her Majesty the Queen has herself set an example of this
industry, as well as largely patronised the industrial knitters of
Scotland. Of the rudiments of this useful art many ladies are at present
ignorant; it is in the hope of being useful to these that the following
instructions are offered.

To knit, two, three, four, or five needles, and either thread, cotton,
silk, or wool are required.

Knitting needles are made of steel, of ivory, or of wood; the size to be
used depends entirely upon the material employed, whether thread,
cotton, silk, single or double wool, for knitting. As the size of the
needles depends upon that of the cotton, a knitting gauge is used (see
No. 287). The gauge (page 290) is the exact size of Messrs. H. Walker
and Co.'s knitting gauge. Our readers will remark that English and
foreign gauges differ very essentially; the finest size of German
needles, for example, is No. 1, which is the size of the coarsest
English wooden or ivory needle. Straight knitting is usually done with
two needles only for round knitting for socks, stockings, &c., three,
four, and five needles are employed.

[Illustration: 287.--Knitting Gauge.]

       *       *       *       *       *

288.--_Casting On_.

This term is used for placing the first row or round of knitting
stitches on the needles--"casting them on"--and is done in two ways--by
"knitting on" the stitches, or as follows:--

Hold the thread between the first and second finger of the left hand,
throw it over the thumb and first finger so as to form a loop, and pass
the needle in the loop; throw the thread lightly round the needle, pass
it through the loop, and draw up the thread; this forms the first stitch
(see No. 288).

[Illustration: 288.--Casting On.]


289.--_To Knit On_.

[Illustration: 289.--Knitting On.]

Take the needle on which the stitches are cast in the left hand, and
another needle in the right hand--observe the position of the hands (No.
289). Hold the left-hand needle between the thumb and third finger,
leaving the first finger free to move the points of the needles. (The
wonderful sense of touch in the first or index finger is so delicate,
that an experienced knitter can work without ever looking at her
fingers, by the help of this touch only--in fact, knitting becomes a
purely mechanical labour, and as such is most useful.) Insert the point
of the right-hand needle in the loop or stitch formed on the left-hand
needle, bring the thread once round, turning the point of the needle in
front under the stitch, bringing up the thread thrown over, which in
its turn becomes a stitch, and is placed on the left-hand needle.


290.--_Simple Knitting (plain)_.

[Illustration: 290.--Plain Knitting.]

Pass the right-hand needle into the 1st stitch of the left-hand needle,
at the back throw the thread forward, and with the first finger pass the
point of the needle under the stitch in forming a fresh stitch with the
thread already thrown over, as in "knitting on," only, instead of
placing the newly-formed stitch on the left-hand needle, leave it on the
right-hand needle, and let the stitch drop off the point of the
left-hand needle. Continue thus until all the stitches are taken from
the left to the right-hand needle, and the row is then complete.


291.--_To Purl, Pearl, or Seam_.

Seaming or purling a stitch is done by taking up the stitch _in front_
instead of at the back, throwing the thread over and knitting the stitch
as in plain knitting; but before beginning to purl, the thread must be
brought in front of the needle, and if a plain stitch follows, the
thread is passed back after the purl stitch is made (see No. 291).
[Illustration: 291.--Purling.]


292.--_To Increase_.

Increasing or making a stitch is done by throwing the thread once round
the needle and in the next row knitting it as an ordinary stitch.

[Illustration: 292.--Increasing.]


293.--_To Decrease_.

This is done in two ways: _firstly_, taking up two stitches and knitting
them together as one; _secondly_, by taking up a stitch without knitting
it, called slipping, then by knitting the following stitch in the usual
way, and then slipping the 1st (unknitted) over the 2nd (knitted) (see
No. 293). When it is necessary to decrease two stitches at once, proceed
thus:--Slip one, knit two stitches together, then slip the unknitted
stitch over the two knitted together.

[Illustration: 293.--Decreasing.]


294.--_Round Knitting_.

To knit a round four or five needles are used; it is thus that
stockings, socks, cuffs, mittens, &c., are made. To knit with four
needles, cast on, say, 32 stitches upon one needle, insert a second
needle in the last stitch of the first, and cast on 30 stitches; proceed
in a similar way with a third needle, but casting on 28 only; when this
is done, knit the two extra stitches on the first needle on to the last;
this makes 30 stitches upon each needle, and completes the round.


295.--_Casting Off_.

Knit two stitches, and with the left-hand needle slip the first stitch
over the second; continue this to the end of the row. _Note_.--The last
knitted row, before casting off, should be knitted loosely.


296.--_To Pick up a Stitch_.

This is done by taking up the thread between two stitches and forming a
stitch with it.

       *       *       *       *       *

The following Designs of New Stitches can be used for a variety of
work:--

297.--_Peacock's Tail Pattern_.

Needles, wood or ivory; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton.

[Illustration: 297.--Peacock's Tail Pattern.]

Cast on a number of stitches divisible by nine, as it takes nine
stitches for each pattern, and two for each border; the border, which
is in plain knitting, will not be mentioned after the first row.

1_st Row_.--2 plain for border; 2 plain *, make 1, 1 plain, repeat this
four times from *, make 1, 2 plain; repeat from the beginning--then 2
plain for border.

2_nd Row_.--2 purl, 11 plain, 2 purl; repeat.

[Illustration: 298.--Spiral Stitch.]

3_rd Row_.--Take 2 together, 11 plain, take 2 together; repeat.

4_th Row_.--Purl 2 together, purl 9, purl 2 together; repeat.

5_th Row_.--Take 2 together, 7 plain, take 2 together.

Begin from the 1st row.

Thirteen stitches are large enough for a stripe for a sofa-cover. These
stripes should be sewn together after all are finished.

       *       *       *       *       *

298.--_Spiral Stitch_.

Materials: Needles, thick steel or bone; double wool.

This stitch is far more effective worked in thick wool than in cotton.
It is done in stripes alternately wide and narrow. For wide stripes cast
on twenty-one stitches, for narrow fifteen; this without counting the
first and last stitch, the first being slipped, the last always plainly
knitted.

1_st Row_.--Purl 3 together to end of row.

2_nd Row_.--Make 1, * 1 plain, make 2, repeat from * end by making the
last stitch before the plain knitted one at end of row.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration 299.--Knotted Stitch.]

299.--_Knotted Stitch_.

Materials: Needles, wood or ivory; double wool.

Cast on 11 stitches.

1_st Row_.--All plain, throwing the wool twice round the needle before
each stitch.

2_nd Row_.--Each stitch on the needle is now composed of 3 threads of
wool: knit the first plain, the second purl, the third plain; cast off
the second over the third, and the first over the second; this leaves
but one stitch; repeat from first row until a sufficient length is
obtained. This pattern makes very pretty borders.

       *       *       *       *       *

300.--_Knitted Moss Borders_.

Materials: Steel needles; moss wool of several shades of green.

Cast on enough stitches for double the width required, say twenty, and
knit very tightly in plain knitting, row by row, until a sufficient
length has been obtained. Cut off and place the strip on a sieve over a
basin of boiling water, and cover it over. When it has absorbed the
steam, and while wet, iron it with a box-iron. Then cut the strip down
the centre, and unravel the wool on each side. The threads of wool all
curling, resemble moss. They are held firmly by the selvedge of the
knitting.

       *       *       *       *       *

301.--_German Brioche Stitch_

Materials: Wood or ivory needles; wool.

Cast on an even number of stitches.

All the rows are knitted as follows:--Slip 1, taken as for purling,
make 1, take 2 together. In the following rows the made stitch must
always be slipped, the decreased stitch and the slipped stitch of the
previous row knitted together.

[Illustration: 301.--German Brioche Stitch.]

Ordinary Brioche Stitch is made by casting on an even number of
stitches, and working the rows as follows:--

Make 1, slip 1, take 2 together; repeat. _Note_.--The made stitch and
the slipped stitch of the previous row must always be knitted together,
and the decreased stitch of that row slipped.

       *       *       *       *       *




NETTING.

302.--NETTING is one of the prettiest and one of the easiest
accomplishments of a lady. The materials are simple, while the effects
produced by good netting are most elegant and of great durability. One
great advantage of netting is that each stitch is finished and
independent of the next, so that if an accident happens to one stitch it
does not, as in crochet or knitting, spoil the whole work.

Netting, so easy to do, is most difficult to describe. The materials
required are--a netting-needle and mesh (see illustration No. 302).
These are made of bone, of wood, of ivory, and most commonly of steel.
The wood, bone, and ivory are only used for netting wool, the steel for
silk, cotton, &c.

The needle is filled by passing the end of the thread through the little
hole at the left-hand point, and tying it; then the thread is wound on
the needle as on a tatting shuttle. The needles are numbered from 12 to
24; these last are extremely fine. The meshes correspond to the sizes of
the needles, and are made of the same materials. The larger the size of
the stitch required the thicker the mesh must be selected; indeed, large
hat meshes are often used for some patterns. A stirrup to slip over the
foot to which the foundation is attached is required by those who do
not use a netting cushion, placed before them on the table and heavily
weighted; to this the foundation is fastened.

The stirrup is made of a loop of ribbon, to which the foundation is
tied. Some ladies work a pretty stirrup of the exact shape of a
horseman's stirrup; a loop of ribbon is passed through this, and the
foundation fixed as before.

[Illustration 302.--Needle and Mesh.]

303.--_To Net_.

Place the mesh under the thread, between the thumb and finger of the
left hand; it must rest on the middle of the finger and be held only by
the thumb (see illustration No. 303). Take the needle in the right hand,
pass the thread over the middle and ring finger and over the mesh, pass
the needle upwards and behind the mesh in the large loop which forms the
thread round the fingers, and at the same time through the first stitch
or loop of the foundation. Draw the needle out, retaining the loops on
the fingers and dropping them off, the little finger being the last to
release the thread. As the thread tightens and the knot is firm, the
loop on the little finger should be drawn up quickly and smartly. The
next stitches are precisely similar, and row upon row is formed in the
same manner. Having learnt the stitch, the next task is to make a
foundation. Tie a large loop of strong thread on the stirrup ribbon, and
net fifty stitches into this loop, then net four or five rows, and the
foundation is ready.

[Illustration: 303.--Netting.]

Simple netting as above explained forms diamonds or lozenges. When a
piece of netting is finished it is cut off the foundation, and the
little ends of thread that held the stitches are drawn out.

304.--_Square Netting_.

Is done precisely in the same manner as plain netting, only begin from
one stitch, then net two stitches into this first, and increase by
making two in the last loop of every row. As soon as the right number of
stitches is complete diminish exactly in the same way by netting two
stitches as one at the end of each row until one stitch alone remains.
These squares are used for guipure d'art and for darning on.

305.--_Round Netting_

Is nearly similar to plain netting. A little difference exists in the
way of passing the needle through the stitch; this is shown in No. 305.
After having passed the needle through the stitch it is drawn out and
passed from above into the loop just made. This stitch is very effective
for purses.

[Illustration: 305.--Round Netting.]

306.--_Diamond Netting_

Is often called "pointed netting," and is made by netting from one
stitch, increasing one stitch at the end of each row, and decreasing in
the same way, as described at page 303.

307.--_To Net Rounds_.

To form a circle, as for a purse, the needle must pass through the first
stitch, keeping the last three or four on the mesh and removing this
when required by the work.

308.--_"English" Netting_

Is made as follows:--Net a row of plain netting, begin the second row by
netting the second stitch, then net the first; repeat, always passing by
one stitch and taking it up.

_3rd Row_.--Plain.

_4th Row_.--Begin by a plain stitch, then continue as in the 2nd row.

_5th Row_.--Plain.

[Illustration: 308.--"English" Netting.]

309.--_Lace Edging_.

Begin by one stitch and net two in one at the end of each row until as
many stitches are required for the narrowest part of the edge. *
Increase one then in the two loops until the point of the edge or
scallop is reached; at the next row leave the squares which form the
point, and begin from *.

310.--_Open Lace_.

This kind of edging is made with two meshes of different sizes and
extremely fine crochet cotton.

Tie the thread to the foundation, net 3 rows with the small mesh of the
required length.

_4th Row_.--On the large mesh, one stitch in each stitch.

_5th Row_.--On the small mesh take 3 stitches together to form 1 loop;
repeat to end of row.

_6th Row_.--On the large mesh make 5 loops in each stitch; repeat to end
of row.

[Illustration: 310.--Open Lace.]

_7th Row_.--On the small mesh, one loop in each of the 4 first stitches,
pass over the 5th, repeat to end.

_8th Row_.--On the small mesh make a loop in each of the two first
stitches, pass over the 4th; repeat.

_9th Row_.--On the small mesh make a loop in each of the two first
stitches, pass over the 3rd; repeat.

This lace is often used in fine wool of two colours to trim opera-caps,
children's hoods, &c.

311.--_Shell Border_.

This border is intended as an edging for square netting for
couvrettes, d'oyleys, &c. The mesh must be three times as
long as that employed for the square netting.

Make 12 stitches in the first stitch of the edge, pass over 8,
make 12 in the ninth, and repeat. Then take the mesh used
for the square netting, and net one stitch in each stitch, take
a still smaller mesh, and complete by adding another row of
one stitch in each stitch.

This border forms a very appropriate edging for all articles
in square netting, as couvrettes, mats, also for trimming guipure
d'art work, and should be netted in the row of holes edging the
work; two sets of shells must be worked at the corners when
a little fulness is required.

[Illustration: 311.--Shell Border.]

       *       *       *       *       *


KNITTING AND NETTING
PATTERNS


312.--_Knitted Sock for a Child._

Materials for 1 pair: 1 ounce of single Berlin wool; 1 yard of narrow
pink or blue ribbon; 2 fine steel pins.

This sock fits well, and is easy to make. It is knitted upon two pins,
backwards and forwards. Cast on 22 stitches and knit 22 rows, but
increase once at the end of every other row on the right side of the
work, so that there are 33 stitches in the 22nd row. Now cast off 28
stitches and knit 12 rows, increasing 1 stitch at the end of every other
row. Now 12 more rows, decreasing 1 stitch at the end of every other
row; this forms the toe. Cast on 28 stitches on the same needle, and
knit 22 rows, decreasing 1 stitch at the end of every other row, and
cast off. Pick up the 68 stitches on the upper part of shoe, and knit 20
rows, alternately 2 plain and 2 purl rows, decreasing 1 stitch on each
side of the 12 stitches in every other row, which forms the toe and
front of sock. Knit 14 rows of 2 plain, 2 purl stitches alternately,
then 3 open rows with 1 plain row between. The open rows are worked as
follows:--* Purl 2 together, purl 1, make 1, repeat *, 3 plain rows, 1
open row, 1 plain row, and cast off. The sock is sewn together down the
back of leg, centre of sole, and the point joined like a gusset to form
the toe.

[Illustration: 312.--Knitted Sock.]

       *       *       *       *       *

313.--_Knitted Pattern for Counterpanes, Berceaunette Covers,
Couvrettes, Antimacassars, &c._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton; 5 steel
knitting-needles of a corresponding size.

[Illustration: 313.--Knitted Pattern for Counterpanes, Berceaunette
Covers, &c.]

According to the size of the cotton employed, this beautiful square
makes different articles, such as counterpanes, couvrettes, &c. &c. If
worked with Evans's cotton No. 10, it will be suitable for the
first-mentioned purpose. Begin the square in the centre, cast on 8
stitches, 2 on each needle; join them into a circle, and knit plain the
1st round. 2nd round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1; repeat
3 times more from *.

3rd round: Plain knitting. This knitted round is repeated after every
pattern round. We shall not mention this again, nor the repetition from
*.

4th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, knit 1.

6th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton
forward, knit 1.

8th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton
forward, knit 1.

The 9th to 18th rounds are knitted in the same manner, only in every
other round the number of stitches between the 2 stitches formed by
throwing the cotton forward increases by 2, so that in the 18th round 15
stitches are knitted between.

20th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, knit 5, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted
stitch, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit
1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

22nd round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch, throw
the cotton forward, knit 4, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the
knitted stitch, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 4, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward, knit 1.

24th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch; throw
the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped over the knitted
stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, slip 1, knit 1, draw the
slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 3, throw
the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward,
knit 1.

26th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward 3 times alternately, slip 1, knit 1, draw the first over
the last, throw the cotton forward; knit 2, slip 1, knit 1, draw the
first over the last, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 2, three times
alternately, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton
forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

28th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, four times
alternately, throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped
over the knitted stitch; throw the cotton forward, knit 1, slip 1, knit
1, draw the slipped over the knitted stitch; knit 1, knit 2 together,
knit 1, four times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward,
knit 1.

30th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, six times
alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped
over the knitted stitch, knit 1 six times alternately, knit 2 together,
throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

32nd round: Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 6 times
alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped
over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 stitches
together, 6 times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

34th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 7 times
alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped
over the knitted stitch, knit 1, 7 times alternately knit 2 together,
throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

36th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 7 times
alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped
over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 4 stitches
together, 7 times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

38th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 8 times
alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the, slipped
over the knitted stitch, 8 times alternately knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

40th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, 8 times
alternately throw the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped
over the knitted stitch, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 stitches
together as 1 stitch, 8 times alternately throw the cotton forward, knit
2 together, throw the cotton torward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward,
knit 1. You now have 41 stitches on each needle; knit 1 round, and cast
off. When completed, the squares are joined together on the wrong side.

       *       *       *       *       *

314.--_Knitted Sleeping Sock._

Materials for one pair: 4 ounces white fleecy, 3 ply; 1 ounces light
blue fleecy.

[Illustration: 314.--Knitted Sleeping Sock.]

These socks are knitted with white and blue wool in a diamond pattern,
and in rounds like a stocking. Begin at the upper part of the sock; cast
on 103 stitches with blue wool on pretty thick steel knitting-needles,
and knit 20 rounds of the diamond pattern as follows:--

1st round: Quite plain.

2nd round: Purled; both these rounds are worked with blue wool.

3rd to 6th rounds: Knitted plain with white wool.

7th round: With blue wool; knit 3, draw the wool through the next stitch
of the 2nd round worked with blue wool, draw it out as a loop, keep it
on the needle, knit again 3 stitches, and so on. 8th round: With blue
wool; the loop which has been taken up on the preceding round is purled
off together with the preceding stitch. Repeat the 3rd and 8th rounds
twice more; the loop of one round must be placed between those of the
preceding one. Then knit with white wool 31 rounds, alternately 2
stitches knitted, 2 stitches purled, then work the foot in the diamond
pattern in the same way as usual for a stocking. The heel is formed by
leaving 23 stitches on each side the seam stitch, and knitted backwards
and forwards in the diamond pattern. At the toe decrease so that the
decreasings form a seam on both sides of the toe. This is obtained by
knitting the 3rd and 4th stitches of the 1st needle together; on the 2nd
needle slip the 4th stitch before the last, knit the next stitch and
draw the slipped stitch over the knitted one; decrease in the same
manner on the other 2 needles of this round. Repeat these decreasings
exactly in the same direction and at the same places, so that there are
always 4 stitches between the 2 decreasings at the end and at the
beginning of 2 needles; they always take place after 3 or 2 plain
rounds, and at last after 1 plain round. The remaining stitches are
knitted off 2 and 2 together. To complete the sock, the outline of the
sole is marked by working slip stitches with blue wool in crochet all
round it; work also slip stitches on the selvedge stitch of the heel.
The stocking is finished off at the top with a double round of loops in
blue wool, worked over a mesh four-fifths of an inch wide.

       *       *       *       *       *

_315 and 316.--Netted Fichu or Cape._

Material: Fine wool, or white and blue silk; netting needle and
meshes.

This fichu or cape is made either with fine wool or with silk used three
or four times double. It may be worn as an evening wrap, either over a
cap or on the hair, or as a necktie. The ground in our pattern is white,
the border blue. The illustration of the ground and of the border, in
full size, will serve as a guide for the size of the meshes to be used.
For the ground cast on the first mesh, with white silk, 56 stitches;
work 2 rows on the 56 stitches. From the 3rd row, always miss the last
stitch, so that each row is decreased 1 stitch. Continue in this manner
till the 39th row, when there will be but 19 stitches left. From the
40th row, miss 2 stitches at the end of each row. The ground is
completed with the 46th row. The 1st row of the work is the _cross-way
side_; the last, the _point at the bottom_; fasten on the blue silk to
the 1st stitch of the 1st row, and on a larger mesh work 1 row round the
ground of the fichu, not forgetting that the stitch on the outer edge at
the sides must always be taken, and 2 stitches made in the 5th, 10th,
14th, [Illustration: 315.--Netted Fichu, or Cape, for Evening Dress.]
18th, 21st, 23rd, and 25th stitches at the sides, as well as in each of
the 2 middle stitches of the last row; in each of the other stitches 1
stitch should be made. On the corners of the sides increase _once_, on
the cross-way side, seven times in all. This forms the 1st round of the
edging or lace.

[Illustration: 316.--Showing the Netting full size for Border of Fichu.]

2nd round of the lace: In each stitch make 2 stitches--still on the
larger mesh. 3rd round: Always miss the small flat scallop formed in
last row, and work 2 stitches in the stitch which forms a tight loop.
Keep thus the same number of stitches, with which work 6 more rounds.
For the last round, work 1 stitch in each _tight_ loop.

       *       *       *       *       *

_317.--Lady's Knitted Purse._

Materials: 2 skeins of black purse silk; 2 skeins of scarlet ditto;
black jet beads; a steel clasp with chain; a tassel of black beads; 5
steel knitting-needles.

[Illustration: 317.--Lady's Knitted Purse.]

This purse is knitted with black and scarlet purse silk, and ornamented
with black beads and a black bead tassel. Begin the purse with the black
silk in the centre of the bottom part, and cast on for one part of it 7
stitches. Knit 14 rows on these backwards and forwards, in such a manner
that the work is knitted on one side and purled on the other. The 1st
stitch of every row is slipped, the 1st row of this part is purled. * On
that side where hangs the thread with which you work take the back chain
of the 7 selvedge stitches of the part you have just knitted on a
separate needle, and knit another part, which must have 15 rows, and the
1st row of which is knitted. Repeat 10 times more from *. The stitches
of several parts can be taken on the same needle, so as not to be
hindered in working by too many needles. When the 12th part is
completed, take the selvedge stitches on the left hand on another
needle, cast them off together with the cast on stitches of the 1st
part, and fasten the silk thread. Then take the 7 right-hand selvedge
stitches of one black part on a needle, take the red silk on which the
beads have been strung and work 15 rows on these stitches, the 1st row
from the wrong side, and therefore purled; in the 1st, as well as in all
the other purled rows, the last stitch must be purled together with the
next stitch of the next black part. In the purled rows, moreover,
excepting in the first and last one, a bead must be worked in after
casting off the 2nd, 4th, and 6th stitches. The stitch must be worked by
inserting the needle into the back part, and in drawing through the silk
which has been thrown forward, let the bead slide through the stitch so
that it is on the right side of the work. In the following knitted row,
the needle must also be inserted into the back part of the bead stitch.
When 12 such red parts have been completed, work again 12 black parts on
the selvedge stitch of the same, in which the beads are not knitted in,
but sewn on afterwards, when the purse is completed. Then work 3 times
more alternately 12 red and 12 black parts; when the last 12 black parts
have been completed cast off the stitches of the last black part
together with the selvedge stitches, the 1st on the wrong side; the
stitches of the 6th part are cast off in the same manner together with
the selvedge stitches of the 7th. The red parts which remain to be
worked on the black part are thus lessened by 2; the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th,
and the 7th, 8th, and 9th of these parts must be by 6 rows longer. Then
gather all the stitches and selvedge stitches of the 10 parts on 2
needles, in such a manner that the 2 black parts, the stitches and
selvedge stitches of which have been cast off together, are placed on
the sides of the purse, and knit as follows with black silk, first on
the stitches of the one needle, and then on those of the other:--1 row
knitted, knitting together every 3rd and 4th stitch; then work 3 rows
backwards and forwards on the same number of stitches, which must be
knitted on the right side; then work 8 rows more in the same manner,
casting off the 2 first stitches of the 8 rows. Then cast off all the
remaining stitches, sew the beads on the black parts from illustration;
also the clasp and bead tassel.

       *       *       *       *       *

318 to 320.--_Knitted Antimacassar or Berceaunelle Cover._

Materials: Grey and violot fleecy wool.

[Illustration: 318.--Square for Antimacassar.]

This antimacassar, part of which is seen on No. 320, smaller than full
size, is made of rosettes and small squares, which are knitted
separately with violet and grey fleecy wool with fine knitting-needles.
In the middle of each rosette sew on a tatted circle of grey wool. The
edge of the antimacassar is ornamented with a grey woollen fringe. For
each rosette cast on 6 stitches with violet wool, and knit 12 rows
backwards and forwards in such a manner that the work is knitted on one
side and purled on the other: the first of these 12 rows is purled, the
first stitch of every row is slipped; * then take the first five
selvedge stitches of the knitted part on a separate needle (on the side
where the end of wool hangs down, leaving it unnoticed for the present),
inserting the needle into the back chain of the stitch (the selvedge
stitch which is next to the cast-on stitch remains, therefore, unworked
upon), and knit on these a new part, which must have 13 rows; the first
row is knitted, and in this row work 2 stitches in the first stitch, one
purled and one knitted, so that this new part is equally six stitches
wide. Repeat 8 times more from *. After having worked several parts, the
stitches can, of course, be taken on the same needle, so as not to
increase the number of needles. When the 10th part is com-* *pleted,
take the selvedge stitches of the left-hand side of the same on a
separate needle, cast them off with the cast-on stitches of the first
part, and fasten the wool. Then take the 6 selvedge stitches on the
right hand of one part on a separate needle; take the grey wool, and
work on these stitches 13 rows backwards and forwards; the first row is
knitted; it is worked on the right side of the work; in this, and in
every following _knitted_ row, knit the last stitch together with the
next stitch of the next violet part. When 10 such grey parts are
completed (each of the remaining 9 parts consists of 13 rows, and begins
with one knitted row), take all the stitches and the selvedge stitches
of these parts on four needles and knit with these stitches, also with
grey wool 1 row knitted, in which the 6 selvedge stitches must be
decreased to 3 by knitting always 2 stitches together as 1 stitch; each
of the other stitches is knitted as usual. Then purl 2 rows with violet
wool, and cast off.

[Illustration: 319.--Rosette for Antimacassar.]

[Illustration: 320.--Part of Antimacassar.]

For the tatted circle in the centre of the rosette, work with grey wool
a circle consisting of 1 double, and 11 times alternately 1 purl 3-10ths
of an inch long, 2 double, then 1 purl and 1 double. The circle is sewn
on the rosette, from illustration, with grey wool. No. 319 shows such a
rosette full size. The small squares (_see_ No. 318) are worked with
grey wool; cast on 36 stitches, join the stitches into a circle, and
purl 2 rows. To form the corners, knit together 4 times 2 stitches after
every 7 stitches in the first of these two rounds, in the second round
knit together 2 stitches after every 6 stitches; these decreasings and
those of the other rounds must always take place, at the same places as
in the preceding round. Then take the violet wool, and knit 7 rows; in
the first of these knit 4 times 2 stitches together after intervals of 5
stitches; no decreasings take place in the 2nd, 4th, and 6th rows; in
the 3rd row knit together 4 times 3 stitches as 1 stitch, and in the 5th
and 7th rows 4 times 2 stitches as 1 stitch. After the 7th round, the
remaining stitches are cast off together as 1 stitch. Then fasten the
wool and cut it off. Lastly, sew the rosettes and squares together from
No. 320 for a cover, and edge it round the border with a fringe of grey
wool.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 321.--Knitted Border.]

321.--_Knitted Border._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s No. 10 or No. 50 knitting
cotton.

If knitted with thick cotton, this border will be suitable for trimming
a quilt or berceaunette cover; if, on the contrary, fine cotton is used,
the pattern will form a very pretty collar for a little boy or girl.

To make a collar, begin by a chain of 220 stitches, and work 6 rows
backwards and forwards alternately, knitting 4 stitches and purling 2.

In the 2nd, 4th, and 6th rows the 4 stitches are purled, and the 2 are
knitted.

7th row: * Purl 2, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from *.

8th row: Alternately purl 5, knit 2. All the rows with _even_ numbers
are knitted like this, except that the number of the knitted stitches
are increased by 2 in each of them. We will not, therefore, henceforth
mention these rows.

9th row: * Knit 2, make 1, knit 1, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from
*.

11th row: * Knit 2, make 1, knit 3, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from
*.

13th row: * Knit 2, make 1, knit 5, make 1, knit 2, purl 2. Repeat from
*. The pattern is continued in the same manner. The small gores formed
between the ribs are increased by 2 stitches in every second row. Each
of these gores has 13 stitches in the 21st row, which is the last. Cast
off all the stitches after this row.

Take a crochet needle, and with the same cotton as that used for the
knitting work 1 stitch of double crochet in every stitch of the
selvedge, then the 2 following rows for the edging. 1st row: Alternately
1 treble, 1 chain, under which miss 1.

2nd row: Alternately 1 double over 1 treble of preceding row, 1 purl
(that is, 5 chain and 1 slip stitch in the first), under which miss 1.
Over the first row of the knitting work 1 row of close double crochet.
The border is now completed.

       *       *       *       *       *

322.--_Knee-cap in Knitting._

Materials: For 1 pair, 4 oz. pink 4-thread fleecy wool, and a small
quantity of white ditto.

Begin each knee-cap by casting on with pink wool 114 stitches, equally
divided upon 4 needles, and joining them into a circle. Upon this number
of stitches work 47 rounds, alternately knitting and purling 2 stitches.
In the 48th round begin the gore which covers the knee; it is worked
separately backward and forwards, always alternately knitting and
purling 2 stitches.

[Illustration: 322.--Knee-cap in Knitting.]

After 2 rows change the pattern, so as to form small squares Knit the
first row of this gore upon 26 stitches slipped off from the last row on
to a separate needle. At the end of each following row knit the nearest
stitch of the nearest needle, so as to increase 1 stitch in each row of
the gore.

Continue in this way until only 42 stitches remain of the ribbed part.
After this work the remainder of the gore separately, decreasing once at
the beginning and end of each row till only 26 stitches remain; then
take up 23 stitches of the selvedge on each side of these 26 stitches,
and work 47 rounds, alternately knitting and purling 2 stitches.

The edging at the top and bottom of the knee-cap is worked in crochet.
With white wool make a chain of 50 stitches; turn and work 1 row of
crochet _à tricoter_; then work a second row thus: the first part, as
usual, with white, but coming back, with pink make 4 chain between each
stitch, work in the same way on the other side of the foundation chain,
thus forming a small ruche, and sew it on to the edge of the knitting.

       *       *       *       *       *

323.--_Knitted Neckerchief in Black Shetland Wool._

Material: Black Shetland wool.

This three-cornered neckerchief is knitted in the following pattern
(commencing at the corner).

1st row: slip 1, make 1, knit 2 together, inserting the needle into the
back part of the stitch, slip 1, make 1, knit 2 together.

2nd row: Knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool
forward in the preceding row; the other stitches are purled. In the next
row the holes are alternated; the neckerchief must of course be
increased at the beginning and end of every other row. It measures at
the upper edge 1 yard 16 inches across from one corner to the other; the
lower corner is rounded off. The neckerchief is edged with a knitted
lace.

[Illustration: 323.--Knitted Neckerchief in Shetland Wool.]

The lace is worked in rows backwards and forwards, the cross way. Cast
on 22 stitches and work the 1st row as follows:--Slip 1, knit 11, knit 2
together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 6.

2nd row: Slip 1, purl 18, knit 1 and purl 1 with the stitch formed in
the preceding row by throwing the wool forward.

3rd row; Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 9, knit 2 together, throw the
wool forward, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together,
knit 5.

4th row: Slip 1, purl 5, knit 1, purl 1, knit 1 in the stitch formed in
the preceding row by throwing the wool forward, purl 13.

5th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 6, knit 2 together, throw the
wool forward, knit 2 together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together,
throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 4.

6th row: Slip 1, purl 8, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing
the wool forward in preceding row, purl 9.

7th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 4, knit 2 together, throw the
wool forward 4 times alternately, knit 2 together, knit 4.

8th row: Slip 1, purl 3, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing
the wool forward in the preceding row, purl 13.

9th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, knit 2, 5 times alternately; knit 2
together, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 2.

10th row: Slip 1, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the
wool forward in preceding row, purl 5.

11th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, 6 times alternately knit 2 together,
throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 1.

12th row: Slip 1, knit 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool
forward in preceding row, purl 13.

13th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, 5
times alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 2.

14th row: Slip 1, purl 10, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by
throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 5.

15th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 4, knit 2 together, 4
times alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 3.

16th row: Slip 1, purl 3, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by
throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 13.

17th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 6, knit 2 together, 3
times alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 4.

18th row: Slip 1, purl 8, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by
throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 9.

19th row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 8, knit 2 together, twice
alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 5.

20th row: Slip 1, purl 5, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by
throwing the wool forward in preceding row, purl 13.

21st row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 10, knit 2 together,
throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, knit 6.

22nd row: Slip 1, purl 6, knit 1, purl 1 in the stitch formed by
throwing the wool forward in preceding row.

23rd row: Slip 1, throw the wool forward, knit 12, knit 2 together,
knit 7.

24th row: Purled. Repeat from the 1st row till the lace is sufficiently
long. Then sew on the lace round the edge; the lace can be knitted
somewhat narrower for the upper edge. One of the ends of the neckerchief
is knotted, As seen in the illustration, and the other end is drawn
through the knot.

       *       *       *       *       *

_324 and 325.--Knitted Bodice without Sleeves._

Materials: 4 ounces black, 3-1/2 ounces purple fleecy; black silk
elastic; a steel buckle; 9 black bone buttons.

This bodice is knitted in brioche stitch with black and purple wool, so
that the raised ribs appear black on one side and purple on the other.
The bodice fits quite close. It is fastened in front with black bone
buttons and a steel buckle. Two strips of silk elastic are knitted in at
the bottom. Begin at the bottom of the bodice with black wool, and cast
on 170 stitches. The needles must be rather fine, and the knitting not
too loose. Work backwards and forwards 24 rows as follows:--Slip the 1st
stitch, alternately throw the wool forward, slip 1 as if you were going
to purl it, and knit 1. In the next row knit together the stitch which
has been slipped and the stitch formed by throwing the wool forward,
slip the knitted stitch, after having thrown the wool forward. In the
25th row take the purple wool and work 1 row as before.

[Illustration: 324.--Knitted Bodice without Sleeves (Back).]

[Illustration: 325.--Knitted Bodice without Sleeves (Front).]

Now work alternately 1 row with black wool and 1 row with purple, but as
the wool is not cut off, the brioche stitch must be alternately knitted
and purled. Work always 2 rows on the same side from right to left. The
following 26th row is worked with black wool in common brioche stitch,
only the slipped stitch of the preceding row is purled together with the
stitch formed by throwing the wool forward. 27th row: Turn the work,
with purple wool purled brioche stitch. 28th row: On the same side with
black wool knitted brioche stitch. After having worked 40 rows all in
the same manner, begin the front gore. Divide the stitches upon three
needles, 82 stitches on one needle for the back, and 44 stitches for
each front part on the two other needles. Then work the first 11
stitches of the left front part (this row must be worked on that side of
the work upon which the ribs appear purple) in knitted brioche stitch;
the 11th stitch must have a slipped stitch, with the wool thrown
forward, therefore it is a purple rib. After this stitch begin the gore
with the following 13 stitches. The ribs are then worked so that a
purple one comes over a black one, and a black one over a purple one. Do
not work upon the following black stitch; knit the following stitch with
the one formed by throwing the wool forward. Throw the wool forward, and
then only slip the black stitch which had been left, so that it comes
behind the stitch which has just been knitted. This crossing of the
stitch is repeated once more, then knit the following stitch together
with the one formed by throwing the wool forward, throw the wool
forward, slip the crossed black stitch and the two following single
black stitches. The slipped stitch and the stitch formed by throwing the
wool forward before the 3rd single black stitch are then knitted
together, so that the crossed stitches are placed in opposite
directions. The three black stitches which are knitted off together as 1
stitch in the next row form the middle line of the front gore, and are
continued in a straight line to the point of the gore. The crossing
takes place twice in this row, but now the black stitch is slipped
first. After the 24th stitch knit together the following stitch with the
stitch formed by throwing the wool forward. Then continue to work in
common brioche stitch to the other front part, where the gore begins
before the 24th stitch from the end. In the next row, which is worked in
purled brioche stitch with black wool, take up the black loop between
two purple ribs after the 11th stitch; purl it so as to form the stitch
which is missing at that place. The 3 slipped stitches in the preceding
row are purled together as one stitch with the stitch formed by throwing
the wool forward between the ribs. The loop is also taken up on the
other side of the front gore in the same manner, as well as on the other
front part. Then work 6 rows without increasing or decreasing. The
crossing of the stitch is repeated after every 7 rows, always on the
knitted brioche stitch side, with purple wool. In the 18th row of the
gore the 3 middle stitches are not knitted together, but separately, so
that the pattern must be decreased in 26 rows. In the back 30 stitches
only must be decreased, two in every 6th row. After the 60th row another
decreasing takes place on the outer edges of the front parts for the
neck; they decrease 2 stitches (1st rib) after the 5th stitch from the
front edge in every 3rd row. The 5 stitches which close to the neck are
cast off together with the 5 stitches on the shoulders. Then cast off
loosely the stitches of the back; take all the selvedge stitches of the
front on the needles, and knit 24 rows of brioche stitch with black
wool, making 9 button-holes on the right front part. On the wrong side
of this part sew on a strip of black silk, with slits worked round in
button-hole stitch, stitching at the same time into the knitting. The
following scallops are knitted round the top of the jacket and round the
armholes with black wool:--Take the selvedge stitches on the needles,
work 4 rows alternately, 1 stitch knitted, 1 stitch purled, thread the
wool into a Berlin wool-work needle, * cast off 3 stitches together,
draw the wool through the needle, and take the 2 following stitches on
the wool in the worsted-needle; repeat from *. Sew on the buttons the
strips of silk elastic on either side of the black stripe at the bottom,
and fasten the ends of the latter with the steel buckle.


_326.--Baby's Boot._

Materials for one pair: 1/2 ounce red, 1/2 ounce white, Berlin wool;
steel knitting-needles.

This pretty boot consists of a shoe knitted in red wool, and a sock in
white wool ornamented with red. Begin the knitting with the upper
scalloped edge of the latter. Cast on 96 stitches with red wool, divide
them on four needles, and knit in rounds as follows:--1st and 2nd
rounds: With red wool, purled.

3rd to 8th round: With white wool.

3rd round: Knitted.

4th round: * Knit 4, throw the wool forward, knit 1, throw the wool
forward, knit 4, knit 3 together. Repeat 7 times more from *.

5th round: Knitted; the stitches formed by throwing the wool forward are
knitted as one stitch. Knit 3 stitches together at the place where 3
stitches were knitted together in the 4th round, so that the decreasing
of the preceding round forms the middle stitch of the 3 stitches to be
decreased in this round.

6th and 7th rounds: Like the 5th.

8th round: Knitted; you must have 48 stitches left.

9th to 11th round: With red wool. 9th round: Knitted.

10th and 11th rounds: Purled.

12th to 30th round: With white wool.

12th round: Knitted.

13th round to 30th round: Alternately purl 1, knit 1, inserting the
needle in the back part of the stitch.

31st to 33rd round: With red wool.

31st round: Knitted.

32nd round and 33rd round: Purled.

34th and 35th rounds: With white wool. 34th round: Knitted.

35th round: Alternately throw the wool forward, knit 2 together. Each
stitch formed by throwing the wool forward is knitted as one stitch in
the next round.

36th to 38th round: With red wool.

36th round: Knitted.

37th and 38th rounds: Purled.

39th to 47th round: With white wool. Alternately purl 1, slip 1, as if
you were going to purl it; the wool must lie in front of the slipped
stitch; in the following rounds take care to purl the slipped stitches.

[Illustration 326.--Baby's Boot.]

Take now 18 stitches for the front gored sock part (leave 30 stitches
untouched), and work backwards and forwards with red wool. 48th to 50th
row: With red wool.

48th row: Knitted.

49th row: Purled.

50th row: Knitted.

51st to 85th row: With white wool in the pattern described in the 39th
round. But as you work backwards and forwards you must alternately knit
and purl the stitches. Decrease 1 stitch at the beginning and at the end
of the 84th and 85th rows; decrease 1 stitch in the middle of the 85th
row, so that the 85th row has 13 stitches left. After this work with red
wool.

86th row: Knitted.

87th row: Knit 1, purl 2, knit 1, purl 2, knit 1, purl 2, knit 1, purl
2, knit 1.

Repeat these last 2 rows 3 times more and knit plain to the 94th,
decreasing one, however, on each side. Now work with the whole number of
stitches, taking up the selvedge stitches of the gored part and dividing
them with the 30 other stitches on four needles. Knit once more in
rounds; the next 20 rounds are alternately 1 round knitted, 1 round
purled. In the 2 last knitted rounds decrease twice close together in
the middle of the back part of the shoe. Knit 8 rounds; in every other
round decrease twice in the middle of the front of the shoe, leaving 9
stitches between the two decreasings. The number of stitches between the
decreasings decreases with every round, so that the decreasings form
slanting lines meeting in a point. Cast off after these 8 rounds, by
knitting together 2 opposite stitches on the wrong side. The sock part
is edged with a raised red border, which is worked by taking all the red
stitches of the 1st round of the shoe on the needle and knitting 4
rounds, so as to leave the purled side of the stitch always outside;
then cast off very tight. Draw a piece of braid through the open-work
row in the sock part, and finish it off at either end with tassels to
match.

       *       *       *       *       *

327.--_Knitted Border for a Bedquilt_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s No. 8 white knitting cotton;
thick steel pins.

Cast on a sufficient number of stitches for the length of the border,
which must be able to be divided by 31; knit 4 plain rows:

5th row: Alternately make 1, knit 2 together.

Then 5 more plain rows.

[Illustration 327.--Knitted Border for a Bedquilt.]

Now begin the pattern:--1st row: * Make 1, knit 1 _slantways_ (to knit a
stitch slantways, insert the needle from the front to the back and from
right to left); # purl 5; knit 1 slantways. Repeat from # 4 times more
than from * to the end of the row.

2nd row: Purled.

3rd row: Knit 2, * make 1; knit 1 slantways; # purl 5; knit 1 slantways.
Repeat from # four times more. Repeat from * to the end of the row.

4th row: The same as the second.

The continuation of the work is clearly shown in our illustration. The
increasing caused by knitting the _made_ stitches is regularly repeated
in each second row, so that the stitches between the striped divisions
increase, and form large triangles; the striped divisions, on the other
hand, are narrowed so as to form the point of the triangles. To obtain
this result, decrease five times in the 6th, 12th, 18th, and 24th rows,
by purling together the two last stitches of one purled division, so
that each division has but eleven stitches left in the 25th row. In the
28th row knit together one purled stitch with one knitted slantways, so
that there will be only 6 stitches left for each division; these
stitches are knitted slantways in the 29th and 30th rows. In the 31st
row they are knitted together, two and two. There remain in each
division three more stitches, which are knitted together in the 34th
row. Two rows entirely purled completethe upper edge of the border.

       *       *       *       *       *

328.--_Knitted Quilt._

Materials: 8-thread fleecy wool; wooden needles.

This pattern may be worked in narrow strips of different colours, and in
that case each strip should contain 1 row of patterns; or the quilt may
be composed of wide strips with several rows of patterns, those of one
row being placed between those of the preceding. In the first case, that
is if you work narrow strips, you may use several colours; but if wide
strips are preferred, they should be of two colours only. Our pattern
was worked in wide strips, alternately grey and red. Each strip is
knitted the short way.

[Illustration: 318.--Knitted Quilt.]

For a strip with five raised patterns in the width cast on 20 stitches.

2nd row: Right side of the work. Slip 1, purl 1, * make 1, purl 4.
Repeat from * 3 times more; make 1, purl 2.

3rd row: Slip 1, knit all the stitches that were purled in the preceding
row, and purl all those that were made.

4th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 1, make 1, purl 4. Repeat from * 3 times
more; knit 1, make 1, purl 2.

5th row: Slip 1, knit all the purled stitches, purl all the rest.

6th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, make 1, purl 4. Repeat from * 3 times
more; knit 2, make 1, purl 2.

7th row: The same as the 5th.

8th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 3, make 1, purl 4, and so on.

9th row: The same as the 5th row.

10th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over
the knitted one, knit 2, purl 4, repeat from *.

11th row: Knit all the purled stitches, purl all the rest.

12th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch
over, knit 1, purl 4, and repeat from *.

13th row: The same as the 11th.

14th row: Slip 1, purl 1, * slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch
over, purl 4, and repeat.

15th row: Slip 1, * knit 2 together, knit 3. Repeat from * 3 times more;
knit 2 together, knit 2.

The second row of patterns begins with the 16th row. There are only 4 in
this 2nd row, so that after the 1st slipped stitch you purl 3 stitches
instead of 1, and in the 2nd row, after the 4th made stitch, you purl 4
more stitches. Repeat alternately these 2 rows of raised patterns, and
when you have a sufficient number of strips sew them together. Trim the
quilt all round with a knotted fringe.

       *       *       *       *       *

329.--_Stitch in Knitting, for Couvrettes, Comforters, Opera Caps,
Carriage Shawls, Jackets, &c._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 20, or
fine wool.

Cast on an uneven number of stitches.

1st row: Slip 1, *
make 1, knit 1, make 1, knit 1. Repeat from *.

2nd row:
Slip 1, * knit 2 together, and repeat from * to the end of the row.
[Illustration: 329.--Stitch for Couvrettes, Comforters, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

330 _and_ 331.--_Knitted Veil._

Material: Fine Shetland wool.

[Illustration: 330.--Knitted Veil.]

Illustration 330 represents a knitted veil in reduced size. The original
was worked with fine Shetland wool in an open pattern; it is edged with
a knitted lace. Its length is 24 inches, its width 18 inches. Work the
veil from a paper pattern of a shape corresponding to that of
illustration 330. Compare the paper shape often with the knitting in
the course of the work, and try to keep them alike.

Knit the veil in the pattern of the original, or in the pattern of
illustration 331. For the former one begin at the lower edge of the
veil, cast on 45 stitches upon thick wooden needles, and work the 1st
row: * Knit 2, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together twice, repeat
from *.

2nd row: Purled.

3rd row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2 together, * throw the
wool forward, knit 2 together twice, and repeat from *.

4th row: Purled.

5th row: Like the 2nd row. The pattern must be reversed. The pattern
figures increase with the increasings at the beginning and at the end
of each row.

The pattern of illustration 331 consists of the 2 following rows:--1st
row: Slip 1, then alternately throw the wool forward, and knit 2
together.

2nd row: Entirely knitted; make 1 stitch of the wool thrown forward in
the last row. When the veil is finished, wet it, and stretch it over
paper or pasteboard; let it dry, and then edge it with the following
lace:--Cast on 10, knit the 1st.

2nd row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 9.

3rd row: Knitted.

4th row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2, throw the wool forward,
knit 2 together twice, knit 4.

5th row: Knitted.

6th row: Knit 1, throw the wool forward, knit 2, throw the wool forward,
knit 2 together 3 times, knit 3.

7th row: Cast off 3 stitches, knit 10. 8th row: Knitted.

[Illustration: 331. Pattern of Veil.]

[Illustration: 332.--Knitted Pattern with Embroidery.]

       *       *       *       *       *

332.--_Knitted Pattern with Raised Embroidery_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 8 or 20.

This pattern is worked in rows going backwards and forwards with thick
or fine cotton according to the use you wish to make of it. The
star-like figures on the knitted squares are worked with soft cotton in
_point de poste_. Cast on a number of stitches long enough (19 stitches
are necessary for the two squares), work the 1st row: * Knit 11
stitches, alternately 4 times knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward.
Repeat from *, The 2nd row is worked like the 1st, only purled, in this
row, as well as in the following ones, the stitch must be knitted with
the cotton thrown forward _after_ the stitch, the last stitch of a plain
square with the first cotton thrown forward of the open-work figure. The
number of stitches in the last must always be 8. The pattern consists
alternately of these two rows. Each pattern contains 12 rows, with the
13th the squares are reversed. The star figures are embroidered with
double cotton by working 5 chain stitch in the middle of each square;
draw the needle underneath the knitting to the next centre of a square.

       *       *       *       *       *

333 _and_ 334.--_Knitted Table Cover, (see page 578.)_

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s coarse knitting cotton; thick
steel knitting-needles.

[Illustration: 333.--Table-Cover Border.]

This cover is suitable for either a large or a small table, as the
pattern may be increased as much as required. It is suitable for
antimacassars. Cast on 4 stitches, join them into a circle, and work the
1st round four times alternately. Throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

2nd round: Entirely knitted.

3rd round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 1. Repeat 7 times more from
*. After every pattern round knit 1 round plain. Until after the 21st
round, we shall not mention this any more.

5th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 *. From the

7th to the 12th round the knitted stitches in every other round increase
by 1 stitch, so that in the 12th round there are 7 stitches between
those formed by throwing the cotton forward.

13th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 4, knit 2
together *.

15th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, knit 2 together *.

17th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, knit 2 together *.

19th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, *.

21st round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 *.

22nd round: * Knit 2, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 3
*.

23rd round: * Knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton
forward, knit 3 *.

24th round: * Knit 3, knit 2 together, knit 5 *.

25th round: * Knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw
the cotton forward, knit 4.

26th round: Entirely knitted *.

27th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton
forward, knit 1 *.

28th round: Entirely knitted.

29th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 *.

30th round: Entirely knitted.

31st round: * Knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton
forward, knit 3 *.

32nd round: Entirely knitted.

33rd round: * Knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton
forward, knit 4 *.

34th round: * Knit 4, knit 2 together, knit 5, knit 2 together, knit 5
*.

35th round: * Knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 7, throw the cotton
forward, knit 5 *.

36th round: * Knit 5, knit 2 together, knit 3, knit 2 together, knit 6
*.

37th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 5 three times, throw the
cotton forward, knit 1 *.

38th round: * Knit 7, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 8
*.

39th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 6, throw the cotton
forward, knit 3. throw the cotton forward, knit 6, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 *.

40th round: * Knit 9, knit 3 together, knit 10*.

41st round: * Knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 15, throw the
cotton forward, knit 3 *.

42nd round: * Knit 3, knit 2 together, knit 11, knit 2 together, knit 4
*.

43rd round: * Knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 13, throw the
cotton forward, knit 4 *.

44th round: * Knit 4, knit 2 together, knit 9, knit 2 together, knit 5
*.

When the cover is completed, edge it all round, with the following
border worked the short way:--Cast on 5 stitches and knit the 1st row,
slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2.

2nd row: Slip 1, knit the rest. Repeat this row after every pattern row.

3rd row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

5th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2.

7th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

9th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2.

11th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1.

13th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2.

15th round: Cast off 8 stitches, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

16th round: Entirely knitted. Begin again at the 1st row, knit a
sufficient length of the border, and then trim the cover with it on the
outer edge.

[Illustration: 335.--Looped Knitting.]

       *       *       *       *       *

335.--_Looped Knitting._

Materials: 4-thread fleecy wool; 2 wooden knitting-needles; 1 flat
wooden mesh.

Cast on a sufficient number of stitches, and knit the 1st row plain.

2_nd Row_.--Slip the 1st stitch; insert the needle into the next stitch,
and throw the cotton forward as if you were going to knit the stitch;
place the mesh behind the needle in the right hand, and turn the wool
which is on this needle upwards, bring it back again on the needle so
that it is wound once round the mesh, and twice round the needle. Then
only the double stitch through the second stitch, knit it, and insert
the needle into the next stitch, and repeat what has been explained.
Knit the last stitch without a loop.

3_rd Row_.--Before drawing out the mesh, turn the work and knit one
plain row. Every double stitch is knitted as one stitch, so as to attain
the same number of stitches as in the 1st row.

4_th Row_.--Like the 2nd row. Repeat these rows as often as required.

This knitting is chiefly used for borders of mats.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 336.--Pattern for Comforters.]

336.--_Knitted Pattern for Comforters._

Materials: 4-thread fleecy; 2 wooden knitting-needles.

Cast on a sufficient number of stitches.

1st row: * 3 stitches in the first stitch, knit 1, purl 1, knit 1, knit
3 stitches together, repeat from *.

2nd row: Plain knitting.

3rd row: Purled.

4th row: Knitted. Repeat these four rows, only in the next row the 3
stitches knitted together are worked on the 3 stitches worked in 1
stitch, and the 3 stitches to be worked in 1 stitch are to be placed on
the one formed by knitting 3 stitches together.

       *       *       *       *       *

337.--_Knitted D'Oyley. (See page 579.)_

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 36; glazed
embroidery cotton No. 10; steel knitting-needles.

This pattern is knitted with very fine crochet cotton. The middle part
as well as the lace border are worked separately; the latter is sewn on
to the middle part. The spots in the thick parts are worked in
afterwards with coarser cotton. Commence the pattern in the centre, cast
on 6 stitches, join them into a circle, and knit 2 plain rounds.

3rd round: Alternately knit 1, throw the cotton forward.

4th and 5th rounds: Plain.

6th round: Alternately knit 1, throw the cotton forward.

7th round: Plain. Every other round is plain. We shall not mention these
plain rounds any more.

8th round: Knit 2, * throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, knit 3; repeat from * to the end of the round; lastly, throw
the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 1.

10th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together.

12th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together.

14th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together.

16th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 7, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together. The

18th, 20th, 22nd, and 24th rounds are worked like the 16th round; only
the middle plain part of the pattern figures increases by 2 stitches in
every pattern round, so that there are 15 plain stitches in the 24th
round between the 2 stitches formed on either side of the same by
throwing the cotton forward.

26th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 6, knit 2 together, throw
the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2
together.

28th round: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 6, knit 2 together, throw
the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 1.

30th round: * Knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6,
throw the cotton forward knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit
6, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward.

32nd round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 13, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward.

34th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 11, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton forward.

36th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 9, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward,
knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit
1, throw the cotton forward.

38th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 7, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward,
knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton
forward.

40th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 5, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward,
knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit
1, throw the cotton forward.

42nd round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 3, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton forward,
knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton
forward, knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the
cotton forward.

44th round: * Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 1, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit
3, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 5,
throw the cotton forward.

45th and 46th rounds: Plain, then cast off loosely.

For the lace border, which is worked in the short way backwards and
forwards, cast on 22 stitches and knit as follows:--1st row: Slip 1,
knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
knit 4, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the cotton forward,
knit 2 together.

2nd row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 3, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 11.

3rd row: Slip 1, knit 9, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit
2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 5, throw the cotton
forward, knit 1.

4th row: Slip 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 7, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 9.

5th row: Slip 1, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward,
knit 2 together, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit
2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 9, throw the cotton forward,
knit 1.

6th row: Knit 2 together (knit together the stitch and the next stitch
formed by throwing the cotton forward), throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, knit 5, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2,
knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 10.

7th row: Slip 1, knit 10, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
knit 2, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 3, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together (stitch formed by
throwing the cotton forward and the next stitch).

8th row: Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
knit 1, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 12.

9th row: Slip 1, knit 1, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward,
knit 2 together, knit 5, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit
2, throw the cotton forward, knit 3 together, throw the cotton forward,
knit 2 together.

10th row: Knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit
14.

11th row: Slip 1, knit 11, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward,
knit 2, knit 2 together, throw the cotton forward, knit 1, throw the
cotton forward, knit 3 together. Then begin again on the 2nd row, and
work on till the border is long enough; sew the lace on to the centre,
slightly gathering the former. Lastly, work in the spots with glazed or
coarse embroidery cotton.

       *       *       *       *       *

_338.--Knitted Braces_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 8 or 12.

These braces are knitted with coarse white cotton, taken double; the
braces themselves are worked in brioche stitch, the lappets are knitted
plain. Begin at the bottom of the front lappet, make a foundation chain
of 14 stitches, knit 5 rows plain backwards and forwards, then divide
the stitches into two halves to form the button-hole; knit 15 rows on
each of the halves consisting of 7 stitches; then take the 14 stitches
again on one needle and work 17 rows on them. Then work a second
button-hole like the first one; knit 6 more rows plain, increasing 1 at
the end of every row, so that the number of stitches at the end of the
lappet is 20.

Then begin the pattern in brioche stitch; it is worked as follows:--Knit
first 1 row, then slip the first stitch of the first following pattern
row, * throw the cotton forward, slip the next stitch (slip the stitches
always as if you were going to purl them), knit 2 together; repeat 5
times more from *; the last stitch is knitted.

2nd row of the pattern: Slip the 1st stitch, * knit 2; the stitch which
has been formed in the preceding row by throwing the cotton forward is
slipped after the 2nd knitted stitch; repeat 5 times more from *; knit
the last stitch.

3rd row: Slip the 1st stitch, * decrease 1 (here, and in all the
following rows, knit the next stitch together with the stitch before it,
which has been formed in the preceding row by throwing the cotton
forward), throw the cotton forward, slip 1; repeat from *; knit the last
stitch.

4th row: Slip the 1st stitch, * knit 1, slip the stitch which has been
formed in the preceding row by throwing the cotton forward, knit 1, knit
the last stitch. Repeat these 4 rows till the braces are long enough.
The pattern is 19 inches long. Then knit 6 rows plain, decreasing 1 at
the end of every row, then work each lappet separately, dividing the
stitches so that each lappet is 7 stitches wide. Each lappet has 72
rows; after the first 18 rows make a button-hole as described for the
preceding one. Work 18 rows between the 1st and 2nd button-hole. The
lappets are rounded off by decreasing after the 2nd button-hole.

[Illustration: 338.--Knitted Braces.]

       *       *       *       *       *

339.--_Pattern for Knitted Curtains, &c._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 8.

This pattern is suitable for knitting different articles, according to
the thickness of the cotton used. The number of stitches must be
divided by ten. The pattern is knitted backwards and forwards.

[Illustration: 339.--Pattern for Knitted Curtains.]

1st row: All plain.

2nd row: * Knit 1, make 2, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over
the knitted one, knit 5, knit 2 together, make 2. Repeat from *.

3rd row: Purl the long stitch formed by making 2 in preceding row, *
make 2, purl 2 together, purl 3, purl 2 together, make 2, purl 3. Repeat
from *. (By _make_ 2 is meant twist the cotton twice round the needle,
which forms one long stitch, and is knitted or purled as such in next
row.)

4th row: Knit 3, * make 2, slip 1, knit 1, and pass the slipped stitch
over, knit 1, knit 2 together, make 2, knit 5. Repeat from *.

5th row: Purl 3, * make 2, purl 3 together, make 2, purl 7. Repeat
from*.

6th row: Knit 3, * knit 2 together (1 stitch and 1 long stitch), make 2,
knit 1, make 2, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over (the
knitted stitch is a _long stitch_), knit 5. Repeat from *.

Continue the pattern by repeating always from the 2nd to the 5th row;
the 6th row is the repetition of the 2nd row, but it is begun (compare
the two rows) about the middle of the 2nd row, so as to change the
places of the thick diamonds in the following pattern. This will be
easily understood in the course of the work.

       *       *       *       *       *

_340.--Knitted Insertion._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 20 or 30.

Cast on 14 stitches, and knit in rows, backwards and forwards, as
follows:--1st row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, throw cotton forward, knit
2, knit 2 together, throw cotton forward, knit 2, knit 2 together, throw
cotton forward, knit 3. This row is repeated 18 times more; the stitch
formed by throwing the cotton forward is knitted as 1 stitch.

20th row: Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 1, knit 1; place next 3 stitches
upon another needle behind the cotton, and leave them alone; knit 1,
knit 2 together, throw cotton forward, now knit the first 2 of the 3
stitches which have been left; knit the last of the 3 together with the
next stitch on the needle, throw cotton forward, knit 3. Repeat these 20
rows till strip is long enough.

[Illustration: 340.--Knitted Insertion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

341 _and_ 342.--_Knitted Cover for Sofa Cushion._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 12; eight
ply fleecy wool.

[Illustration: 341.--Stitch for Sofa Cover.]

This cushion (15 inches wide, 12 inches high) is made of grey calico; it
is covered on one side with knitting, worked with grey crochet cotton.
The knitted cover has an open-work pattern, worked backwards and
forwards on a number of stitches which can be divided by 2, and which
must suit the width of the cushion, in the following manner:--1st row:
Alternately throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

2nd row: Slip 1, knit the other stitches. The stitch formed by throwing
the cotton forward is knitted as 1 stitch.

3rd row: Knit 1, * throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together. Repeat
from *; after the last decreasing knit 1.

4th row: Like the 2nd row.

These four rows are repeated till the cover is sufficiently large. Draw
a narrow piece of red worsted braid through every other open-work row of
the pattern, as can be seen in illustration 341. When the cushion has
been covered with the knitting, it is edged all round with a border
knitted the long way, in the above-mentioned open-work pattern; it is 14
rows wide, and also trimmed with worsted braid: a fringe of grey cotton
and red wool, 3 1/4 inches wide, is sewn on underneath the border at the
bottom of the cushion; to this is added a thick red worsted cord, by
which the cushion is hung on over the back of an arm-chair. The
cushion, on account of its simplicity, is especially suitable for garden
chairs.

[Illustration: 342.--Sofa Cushion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

343.--Netted Nightcap.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s crochet cotton No. 12.

This cap is netted with crochet cotton over a mesh measuring
three-quarters of an inch round; work first a long square for the centre
of the crown, cast on 28 stitches, and work backwards and forwards 27
rows with the same number of stitches. Then work 34 rounds round this
square, and fasten the cotton. Then count 43 stitches for the front
border, and 24 stitches for the back border, and leave them for the edge
of the cap. On the remaining stitches on each side work the strings in
95 rows backwards and forwards on the same number of stitches; each
string is pointed off at the lower end by decreasing 1 stitch in every
row. Sew in a narrow piece of tape in the back border of the cap; the
remaining part of the border, as well as the strings, are trimmed with
crochet lace or with netted edging, No. 311.

[Illustration: 343.--Netted Nightcap.]

       *       *       *       *       *

344.--_Netted Nightcap_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton, 3-thread, No.
30.

[Illustration: 344.--Netted Nightcap.]

This nightcap is very simple and practical. It consists of two similar
three-cornered pieces, sewn together so as to form a double triangle;
the point of the triangle is turned back, as seen in illustration, and
fastened on the lower half of the same. The cap is edged with a lace; a
similar lace covers the seam between both parts of the cap. The pattern
is worked with crochet cotton over a mesh measuring three-quarters of an
inch round. Begin each half in the corner; cast on 2 stitches, and work
backwards and forwards, increasing 1 stitch at the end of every row,
till the number of stitches is 60. Then sew both halves together, and
trim the cap and strings (the latter are worked as on the cap No. 343)
with the following lace: work 2 rows of open-work treble stitches--the
treble stitches are divided by 1 chain--then work 1 row of double,
always working 4 double round the chain stitches which divide 2 treble
in the preceding row, or with netted edging No. 311.

       *       *       *       *       *

345.--_Knitted Pattern_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s knitting cotton No. 20 for
couvrettes, or Berlin wool for sofa quilts.

This pattern can be worked either in wool or cotton, and is suitable for
many purposes. Cast on a sufficient number of stitches, divided by 18,
for the 1st row: Knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw
the cotton forward knit 2 together, knit 4, purl 6, repeat from *.

2nd row: The stitches knitted in the 1st row are purled as well as the
stitches formed by throwing the cotton forward; the purled stitches are
knitted. This row is repeated alternately, therefore we shall not
mention it again.

3rd row: * Knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the
cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6, purl 2.

5th row: Purl 4, * knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together,
throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 4, purl 6.

7th row: Knit 2, * purl 2, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 6.

9th row: Knit 2, * purl 6, knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, knit 4.

11th row: * Knit 6, purl 2, knit 6, throw the cotton forward, knit 2
together, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together.

13th row: Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, * knit 4, purl 6,
knit 4, throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together.

15th row: * Throw the cotton forward, knit 2 together, throw the cotton
forward, knit 2 together, knit 6, purl 2, knit 6. The knitting can now
be easily continued from illustration.

[Illustration: 345.--Knitted Pattern.]

       *       *       *       *       *

346 _to_ 348.--Knitted Shawl.

Materials: Shetland wool, white and scarlet; steel needles.

[Illustration: 346.--Pattern for Shawl (348).]

[Illustration: 347.--Pattern for Shawl (348).]

This shawl is knitted in the patterns given on Nos. 346 and 347. Both
illustrations show the patterns worked in coarse wool, so as to be
clearer. Begin the shawl, which is square, on one side, cast on a
sufficient number of stitches (on our pattern 290); the needles must not
be too fine, as the work should be loose and elastic.

Knit first 2 rows plain, then 3 of the open-work row of pattern No. 346,
which is worked in the following manner:--1st row: Slip the first
stitch, * knit 2 together, inserting the needle into the back part of
the stitch, slip 1, knit 2 together, throw the wool twice forward;
repeat from *.

2nd row: Knit 1 and purl 1 in the stitch formed by throwing the wool
forward in the preceding row; the other stitches are purled. In the next
row the holes are alternated--that is, after the 1st slipped stitch knit
1, throw the wool forward, and then knit twice 2 together.

When 3 such open-work rows are completed, knit 1 row plain, and then
work the pattern seen on No. 347, which forms the ground, and is worked
in the following way:--1st row: Slip the 1st stitch, alternately throw
the wool forward, and decrease by slipping 1 stitch, knitting the next,
and drawing the slip stitch over the knitted one.

2nd row, entirely purled.

When 6 such rows have been worked in this pattern, work again 9 rows of
the open-work pattern, but work on each side of the 2 stripes, each 6
stitches wide, in the pattern of the ground (No. 347); each first stripe
is at a distance of 4 stitches from the edge, and each second stripe at
a distance of 20 stitches. After the 9th open-work row, work again 6
rows in the pattern of the ground, then again 8 open-work rows, and then
begin the ground, only continue to work on both sides of the shawl the
narrow stripes of the ground pattern, the narrow outer and the two wide
inner stripes of the border in the open-work pattern. When the ground
(pattern No. 347) is square, finish the shawl at the top with two wide
and one narrow open-work row, as at the bottom, divided by stripes in
the ground pattern. Knot in, all round the shawl, a fringe of scarlet
wool; the fringe must be 3-1/2 inches deep.

[Illustration: 348.--Knitted Shawl.]

       *       *       *       *       *

TABLE OF SIZES OF MESSRS. WALTER EVANS & Co.'s
KNITTING COTTON, 3 THREADS.

|------------------|-----------------------------|
|                  |                No.          |
|------------------|-----------------------------|
|Borders           |                20, 80       |
|Couvrettes        |                8            |
|D'Oyleys          |                80, 100      |
|Edgings           |                16, 30       |
|Insertions        |                30, 50       |
|Nightcaps         |                20           |
|Quilts            |                4, 8, 12     |
|Socks             |                20           |
|Table Covers      |                16           |
|------------------------------------------------|



MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS.



ALPHABETS.

       *       *       *       *       *

349.--_Alphabet_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

These letters are embroidered in overcast stitch and in satin stitch,
and are the capitals for the alphabet No. 350. Stars ornament this very
effective alphabet.

[Illustration: 349.--Alphabet (Capitals).]


350.--_Alphabet (Small Letters)_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

This alphabet will be found useful for marking linen as well as
pocket-handkerchiefs. It is worked in satin stitch, the stars in fine
overcast; an eyelet-hole occupies the centre of each star.

[Illustration: 350.--Alphabets (Small Letters)]



351.--_Alphabet of Small Capitals_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 12 for
linen. No. 18 for handkerchiefs.

These letters will be found useful for marking table-linen; they may be
worked either in green, red, or white cotton. The letters are worked in
raised satin stitch with raised dots and open eyelet-holes.

[Illustration: 351.--Alphabet of Small Capitals.]


352.--_Alphabet_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 12.

This pretty alphabet is worked in satin stitch, both raised and veined;
the design is composed of forget-me-not blossoms and leaves. Raised dots
worked in satin stitch form all the fine lines.

[Illustration: 352.--Alphabet in Satin Stitch.]

353.--Alphabet in Coral Stitch.

Material: Coloured ingrain marking cotton, or black sewing silk, or
filoselle.

The letters of this alphabet are particularly suitable for
pocket-handkerchiefs. The embroidery is worked either with marking
cotton, or coloured or black sewing silk; the long white lines are
worked in overcast stitch, the small white spots in satin stitch, the
remaining parts of the letters in coral stitch, as can be distinctly
seen in illustration.

[Illustration: 353.--Alphabet in Coral Stitch.]


354--- Small Alphabet.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This useful alphabet is worked in satin stitch, veined in parts and
ornamented with tendrils. As the alphabet of capitals (page 377, No.
351) and that of these small letters correspond, any name may be worked
from them.

[Illustration: 354.--- Alphabet of Small Letters.]


355.--Alphabet (Capitals).

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 12 and
20.

This alphabet is worked in raised satin stitch, the outlines being
partly scalloped; for the fine lines, which should be worked in
overcast, embroidery cotton No. 20 should be employed.

[Illustration: 355.--Alphabet in Satin Stitch.]


356. Alphabet (Capitals).

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

The alphabet here illustrated is in the florid style; the graceful
flowing lines are worked in raised satin stitch, as well as the
variously-sized dots which ornament the letters.

[Illustration: 356.--Alphabet (Florid Capitals).]


357--Alphabet.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 12 and
16.

The letters are worked in point d'or, or dotted stitch, with an outline
in fine overcast, and large raised spots in satin stitch. The ornamental
wreaths round the first five letters can of course be worked round any
of the others. It is very fashionable to work one letter only upon
handkerchief corners.

[Illustration: 357.--Alphabet in paint d'or.]

358.--_Alphabet in White Embroidery_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16

This alphabet is worked in appliqué; the ears of corn only are worked in
overcast, satin, and knotted stitch. These letters look particularly
well on transparent materials. The ears may be omitted by beginners,
though they add much to the beauty of the alphabet. To this alphabet are
added the ten numerals, which will be found exceedingly useful. By means
of the whole alphabet and all these figures, any combination of initials
and numbers can be made.

[Illustration: 358.--Alphabets and Numerals in White Embroidery.]


359.--_Alphabet (see page_ 402).

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20; very
fine black silk.

The vine-leaves and grapes of this graceful and fanciful alphabet are
worked in veined and slightly raised satin stitch, the tendrils in point
russe; for these the fine black silk is employed.

       *       *       *       *       *

360.--_Sampler (Frontispiece_).

Materials: cambric muslin or fine linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16, 18, and 20; red cotton and black silk.

This illustration shows a sampler which will be found useful for
learning to embroider letters for marking linen. The material used is
cambric muslin or fine linen. Work the embroidery with white embroidery
cotton, red cotton, or black silk. The thick parts of the letters are
worked in slanting satin stitch and back stitch; the outlines of the
stitched parts are worked in overcast, as well as the fine outlines of
the letters and all the fine outlines of the patterns. The monograms and
crowns are worked in a similar manner. Work button-hole stitch round the
outside of the sampler. The letters and crowns may, of course, be
employed for other purposes.

       *       *       *       *       *

361.--_Alphabet (Capitals)_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20

This effective alphabet is very easily worked, the stitches employed
being raised and veined satin stitch, and overcast. The raised dots are
worked in satin stitch, care being taken to preserve their position in
the _centre_ of each open space.

[Illustration: 361.--Alphabet (Capitals).]

       *       *       *       *       *


MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS.


       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 362.--Alice.]

362.--_Alice_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

The letters of this name, except the initial letter, are very simple,
being worked in plain satin stitch, while the initial letter is worked
in raised satin stitch, point de poste, and overcast.


363.--_Amalie_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16 and
20.

[Illustration: 363.--Amalie.]

The highly-ornate initial of this name is not difficult to work,
requiring only great regularity and evenness in embroidering the
tendrils and eyelet-holes. The veinings of the letter must be carefully
defined. The remainder of the name is executed in plain satin stitch, a
few eyelet-holes being introduced.

"Amalie" can easily be altered into "Amelia" by changing the place of
the _a_ and _e_. In the centre of each letter a large eyelet-hole is
placed; smaller eyelet-holes of graduated sizes occupy parts of the
overcast scrolls, which should be worked with No. 20 cotton. The initial
letter is worked in raised satin stitch.


[Illustration: 364.--Amy.]

364.--_Amy_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This pretty name is worked in delicately raised satin stitch and point
de pois; the dots in dotted satin stitch, and the elegant little design
beneath is worked in point russe.


365.--_Annie_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

[Illustration: 365.--Annie.]

The letter _A_ of this name is rather elaborate, and is worked in point
de pois or back stitching, the outlines in fine overcast, the letters in
satin stitch. The ornaments surrounding the word "Annie" are worked in
overcast.


366.--_A.M.K._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This name is worked in satin stitch, with small dots of raised satin
stitch. The eyelet-holes in the middle letter to be worked in overcast.

[Illustration: 366.--A.M.K.]


367.--_B.R._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

[Illustration: 367.--B.R.]

These initials are worked in appliqué in the centre of a medallion in
satin stitch, overcast, and lace stitches.


368.--_Carrie_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

[Illustration: 368.--Carrie.]

This name is very easy to work, being very clearly and simply
embroidered in overcast and satin stitch. The thick dots may be worked
without the eyelet-holes if preferred.

[Illustration: 359.--Caroline.]


369.--_Caroline_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This pretty name requires care in working; the leaves which adorn the
letters must be very well defined; they, as well as the letters, are
embroidered in satin stitch, the initial letter being veined, and the
ornaments worked in overcast and eyelet-holes.


370.--_Charlotte_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

[Illustration: 370.--Charlotte.]

This name is worked in satin stitch and overcast, the small and elegant
dots in point de russe and graduated satin stitch; the large ones are
worked in raised satin stitch.


371.--_Cornelie_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This word is worked in plain satin stitch, the ornamentation in overcast
stitch.

[Illustration: 371.--Cornelie.]


372.--_C.M._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This design is simple, is worked in graduated satin stitch, and is most
elegant.

[Illustration: 372--C.M.]


[Illustration: 373.--Dora.]

373.--_Dora_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 30.

This elaborate design should not be attempted by beginners in the art of
embroidery; it is worked in overcast stitch, raised and veined satin
stitch; the tendrils are entirely worked in graduated overcast; the name
is placed over a graceful spray of wild flowers worked in the
above-named stitches. This pattern, although originally designed to be
worked on net or fine muslin, is far more effective when worked on
cambric or fine lawn.


374.--_D.C._

[Illustration: 374.--D.C.]

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

These letters are worked in satin stitch and veined satin stitch; the
forget-me-nots are worked in raised satin stitch with a small
eyelet-hole in the middle worked in overcast stitch.


375.--_Emily_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16. This
name is worked in satin stitch, the dots in the middle in point de
poste, the rest of the letters in satin stitch and in dotted satin
stitch.

[Illustration: 375.--Emily.]


376.--_Ernestine_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This elegant design is most effective; the first letter very elaborate;
the rest of the letters simply worked in satin stitch. The small stars
are worked in overcast stitch, and the initial letter itself in veined
satin stitch.

[Illustration: 376.--Ernestine.]


377.--_Etta_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 10.

The letters which compose this name are formed entirely of leaves,
flowers, and tendrils, worked entirely in satin stitch and overcast; the
tendrils which surround the name are worked in overcast, and have a few
eyelet-holes placed among them.

[Illustration: 377.--Etta.]


378.--_Eva_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16 and
20.

This name is worked in satin stitch, the leaf in point de sable; the
veinings are worked in raised satin stitch.

[Illustration: 378.--Eva.]


379.--_E.A._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s White and Red Embroidery Cotton
No. 30.

This very pretty monogram is worked quite in a new style of embroidery.
The design represents the emblems of Faith, Hope, and Charity. The
outlines of the shield and cross are worked in overcast, the initials
"E.A.," the torch, and the anchor in satin stitch with white cotton, the
leaves partly in satin stitch with white and partly in point d'or with
red cotton, with only a fine outline in overcast. The cross and the
flames of the torch are embroidered in the same manner.

[Illustration: 379--E.A.]


380.--_E.A.P._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

These pretty initials are worked in satin stitch, the middle
letter in point russe and point de poste.

[Illustration: 380.--E.A.P.]


381.--_E.P._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

These elegant letters are worked in veined and raised satin
stitch.

[Illustration: 381.--E.P.]


[Illustration: 382.--E.R.]

382.--_E.R._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 30.

The ovals are worked in overcast and point de pois, the
letters in satin stitch, the ornamentation in satin stitch and
overcast.


[Illustration: 383.--E.A.]

383.--_E.A._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

These initials are placed in a medallion; they are worked in
satin stitch and overcast, and in appliqué on muslin. For that
part of the pattern in which the name is to be embroidered the
material is taken double.


384.--_Elisabeth_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

This word is embroidered in satin stitch and overcast. A
few small eyelet-holes break the monotony of the outlines, and
give lightness to this name.

[Illustration: 384.--Elisabeth.]


385.--_Elise_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 12 and 16.

The open part of these letters is ornamented by one or more
dots; the thick work is raised over chain stitches worked in
No. 12, a rather coarser cotton.

[Illustration: 385.--Elise.]


386.--_Emma_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.


This name is worked in satin stitch; the large dots may be worked with
the eyelet-holes in fine overcast, the smaller dots in satin stitch. The
remaining letters in raised satin stitch and point de sable.

[Illustration: 386.--Emma.]


387.--_F.B._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This elegant monogram is worked in raised satin stitch, the inside
embroidered with lace. The leaves and tendrils are worked in satin
stitch and point de sable.

[Illustration: 387.--F.B.]

388.--_F.S._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 16 and
20.

The initials "F.S." are placed in the pages of an open book, the
outlines of which are worked in overcast, the sides in point de pois.
The wreath of flowers which surrounds the book is embroidered in satin
stitch, the tendrils and veinings are in overcast. The initials are
worked in fine satin stitch.

[Illustration: 388.--F.S.]


389.--_Fanny._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This name is simply worked in satin stitch and overcast.

[Illustration: 389.--Fanny.]


390.--_Francis._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

The initial letter of this elegant design is worked in fine
over-casting; the centre star in raised satin stitch with lace in the
middle; the leaves surrounding it in veined satin stitch; the other
letters are worked in plain satin stitch; and the dots of the line in
point de poste.

[Illustration: 390.--Francis.]


391.--_E.C._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

The initials "E.C." are worked within a frame of overcast outlines and
satin stitch dots. Vine-leaves and grapes worked in point de pois and
eyelet-holes are placed as ornaments around the frame.

[Illustration: 391.--E.C.]


392.--_Gordon_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This pretty name being worked in raised satin stitch, is very suitable
for gentlemen's handkerchiefs.

[Illustration: 391.--Gordon.]


393.--_Helene_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

We give the French version of this pretty name, it being easily changed
to English "Helen" by omitting the final _e_ in working. The name is
worked in plain satin stitch, slightly raised at the thickest parts of
the letters.

[Illustration: 393.--Helene.]


394.--_H.D.G._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This elegant design is worked in fine overcast and satin stitch, and
point de russe.

[Illustration: 394--H.D.G.]


395--_Jessie._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This design is very simple to work, the letters being so clear and well
defined. The thick satin stitch is scalloped in parts.

[Illustration: 395.--Jessie.]


396.--_J.C._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 12.

The letters "J.C." are worked in raised satin and overcast stitch, the
thickest part of each letter being worked in scallops.

[Illustration: 396.--J.C.]


397.--_Lina_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This name is worked in raised veined satin stitch; the small stars are
worked in point russe round eyelet-holes.

[Illustration: 397. Lina.]


398.--_Lizzie_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This name is worked partly in satin stitch, partly in raised dots and
fine overcast; the letters are in the Greek style, and have an excellent
effect if well worked.

[Illustration: 398.--Lizzie.]


399.--_L.G.A._

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20, and
Linen Thread No. 16.

Lace stitches are introduced in the medallion which incloses these
letters, the outlines being worked in overcast and point de pois, the
pens and initials in raised satin stitch, as also the flowers. The open
portion is filled in with Mechlin wheels, which are thus worked: A
number of single threads cross each other in the space to be filled up;
these are placed about a quarter of an inch from each other. All the
bars in one direction must now be worked in fine button-hole stitch,
then the opposite bars must be worked, and the button-hole stitch must
be continued about six inches past the point where the two lines cross.
The thread must be slipped loosely round the cross twice, running over
and under alternately, so as to form a circle; then work in button-hole
to the centre of a quarter of the circle; make a dot by inserting a pin
in the next button-hole and working three stitches in the loop thus
formed by the pin. These dots may be omitted from these wheels.

[Illustration: 399.--L.G.A.]


400.--_L.C._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

The effect of this design when well worked is excellent, for, although
simple, the contrast between the letters and stars throws each into
relief. Veined and raised satin stitch, with very small eyelet-holes,
are the stitches used here.

[Illustration: 400.--L.C.]


401.--_Marie_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Nos. 20 and
36.

This name is embroidered in satin stitch; the veinings are well defined,
and the tendrils should be worked with No. 30 cotton, as they require
very fine work. Stars of overcast and eyelet-holes are the only
ornaments. [Illustration: 401--Marie.]


402.--_Maria_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 30.

The initial letter of this name is worked in overcast and point de pois,
the remaining letters in satin stitch, the ornamentation in satin stitch
and overcast.

[Illustration: 402.--Maria.]


403.--_Maude_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This name is worked in veined satin stitch; the small stars in raised
satin stitch, and the elegant tendrils are worked in overcast. This work
is peculiarly adapted for the marking of a trousseau.

[Illustration: 403.--Maude.]


404.--_M._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

This elegant design can be worked in coloured silk if preferred, or the
coronet omitted at will. The letter "M" is worked in raised and veined
satin stitch; the centre stars are worked in fine overcast round an
eyelet-hole; the coronet is worked in very fine satin stitch and point
de pois, and stars to correspond with those worked in the letter and in
the wreath below, the leaves of which are worked in satin stitch and
overcast stitch.

[Illustration: 404.--M.--Handkerchief Corner.]


405.--_M.B.D._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

These initials are worked in satin stitch and overcast, the open work in
fine overcast round eyelet-holes.

[Illustration: 405.--M.B.D.]

[Illustration: 406.--M.B.G.]

406.--_M.B.G._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

These elegant letters are simply worked in graduated satin stitch and
fine overcast with eyelet-holes.

[Illustration: 407.--M.H.E.]


407.--_M.H.E._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This elegant design is worked in graduated satin stitch, the middle
letter is done in point croisé. This stitch is only worked on very thin
and transparent materials. Insert the needle into the material as for
the common back stitch, draw it out underneath the needle on the
opposite outline of the pattern so as to form on the wrong side a
slanting line. Insert the needle again as for common back stitch.


408.--_Natalie._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 30.

The initial letter of this word contains all those following, and is
surrounded by a wreath of roses and other flowers; these are worked in
satin stitch, the leaves in point de pois, the letters in raised satin
stitch. The dots which are represented on the groundwork of the initial
are worked in back stitching; these may be worked in scarlet ingrain
cotton if desired for morning handkerchiefs.

[Illustration: 408.--Natalie.]


409.--_O.R._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

This monogram is worked in satin stitch, and the oval is worked in
eyelet-holes of graduated sizes.

[Illustration: 409.--O.R.]


410.--_Phoebe_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

The first letter of this word is very elaborate; it is worked in satin
stitch, point de sable, and point de pois, the rest of the letters in
satin stitch.

[Illustration: 410.--Phoebe.]


411.--_Monogram for Pocket Handkerchiefs_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton Perfectionné
No. 20.

[Illustration: 411.--Monogram for Marking Handkerchiefs]

This monogram is worked partly in appliqué, partly in satin stitch. For
the middle part of the medallion sew on the pattern in appliqué of
cambric with button-hole stitch; the remaining part of the embroidery is
worked in satin stitch and point russe.


412.--_Monogram for Pocket Handkerchiefs_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20, and
Linen Thread No. 20.

This monogram is also worked in appliqué and satin stitch. The circle
all round the medallion is worked in appliqué; in the middle work lace
stitches from illustration. The edge of the medallion is worked round
with button-hole stitch.

[Illustration: 412.--Monogram for Marking Handkerchiefs.]


413.--_Rosa_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

Here the name is inclosed in a medallion of overcast and back stitching,
the lower part having a graceful wreath of leaves worked in satin
stitch. The letters which form the name are worked in raised and
scalloped satin stitch and point de pois.

[Illustration: 413. Rosa.]


414.--_Rosina_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

The stars round this graceful initial letter are worked in raised satin
stitch round an eyelet-hole, the leaves in graduated satin stitch, the
stems overcast, the wreaths of flowers worked in satin stitch and open
eyelet-holes, the stems and veinings in overcast, and the stars on the
stems to correspond with those worked in the letter: the rest of the
letters in simple satin stitch rather thickly raised.

[Illustration: 414.--Rosina.]


415.--_R.S._

Materials: Black china silk; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery
Cotton No. 16.

These letters are worked in raised satin stitch with a design of point
russe worked in black silk.

[Illustration: 415.--R.S.]


416.--_S.E.B._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 16.

These letters are worked in graduated satin stitch, the centre star is
worked in raised satin stitch, and the four surrounding it as
eyelet-holes.

[Illustration: 416.--S.E.B.]


417.--_L.E.P._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 18.

These initials are worked in plain satin stitch, and the elegant stars
are worked in point russe worked round an eyelet-hole.

[Illustration: 417.--L.E.P.]


418.--_Victoria_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Embroidery Cotton No. 20.

This name is most elaborately worked in satin stitch, over-casting and
eyelet-holes. The initial letter is worked in satin stitch, and the
stars in fine overcast round an eyelet-hole.

[Illustration: 418.--Victoria.]

       *       *       *       *       *




POINT LACE WORK.



Lace is of two kinds--pillow lace, which is made upon a cushion or
pillow, and point lace, which is made of stitches or _points_ worked in
patterns by hand, which are joined by various stitches forming a
groundwork, also the result of the needle above.

Pillow lace is entirely worked on the pillow or cushion, the pattern and
ground being produced at the same time. Pillow lace is sometimes
correctly called bone or bobbin lace, but it appears that the
distinction has never been very nicely observed either by lace-workers
or lace-traders, many sorts which are really pillow lace being called
point, on account of some peculiarity in the stitch or pattern.

The requisites for producing lace in perfection are the dexterity and
taste of the workers, and the goodness of the material. To produce many
beautiful fabrics a mechanical dexterity alone suffices, but in
lace-making the worker must have some artistic talent, even when
supplied with designs, for any one can perceive that deviations from the
design are easily made, and that the slightest alteration by a worker
wanting in taste will spoil the whole piece of workmanship.

The following illustrations are specimens of ancient and modern laces
from Mrs. Bury Palliser's collection:--

[Illustration: 419.--Dalecarlian Lace.]

[Illustration: 420.--Old Mechlin.]

[Illustration: 421.--Mechlin Lace (Queen Charlotte's).]

No. 419 shows Dalecarlian lace, made by the women of Dalecarlia. This is
a coarse kind of lace, and is sewn on caps, &c., and, although highly
starched, is never washed, for fear of destroying its coffee-coloured
tint, which, it appears, is as much prized now by the Swedish rustics as
it was by English ladies in the last century.

[Illustration: 422.--Buckingham Point Trolly, 1851 (Black Lace).]

Both these specimens of Mechlin belonged to Queen Charlotte, who much
admired this elegant lace.

No. 423.--The Bedford plaited lace is an improvement on the old Maltese.

Honiton guipure lace is distinguished by the groundwork being of various
stitches, in place of being sewn upon a net ground. The application of
Honiton sprigs upon bobbin net has been of late years almost superseded
by this modern guipure. The sprigs, when made, are sewn upon a piece of
blue paper and united on the pillow with "cutworks" or "purlings," or
else joined with the needle by various stitches--lacet, point, réseau,
cutwork, button-hole, and purling.

[Illustration: 423.--Bedford Plaited Lace (1851).]

Those who wish to study lace and lace-making should read Mrs. Bury
Palliser's _History of Lace_ (Sampson Low and Marston).

[Illustration: 424.--Honiton Guipure Lace.]



POINT LACE.


The materials required for this elegant branch of needlework are neither
numerous nor expensive. TRACING CLOTH, LEATHER, or TOILE CIRÉE, various
BRAIDS and CORDS, LINEN THREAD and two or three sizes of needles,
scissors and thimble. TRACING CLOTH is required when ladies copy point
lace patterns, and is the most convenient mode of taking them, as the
design can be worked upon the tracing cloth, which, though transparent,
is very strong; the price is 1s. 6d. per yard. Fine LEATHER is the
material upon which bought patterns are usually traced, and is decidedly
more pleasant to work on than is any other material. In selecting
patterns ladies should choose those traced upon green leather in
preference to scarlet or buff, as green is better for the eyesight than
any other colour.

[Illustration: 425.--Point Lace Scissors.]

TOILE CIRÉE is only a substitute for leather, and is not as pleasant to
work upon in warm weather.

The needles employed are usually Messrs. Walker's needles, Nos. 9 and
10. The scissors should be small, sharp, and pointed, as in illustration
No. 425. An ivory thimble may be safely employed in this light work.

[Illustration: 426.--Linen Braid.]

[Illustration: 427.--Linen Braid.]

[Illustration: 428.--Linen Braid.]

[Illustration: 429.--Linen Braid.]

[Illustration: 430.--Linen Braid.]

[Illustration: 431.--Linen Braid.]

The BRAIDS are of various widths and kinds. None but pure linen braid
should be employed; those with machine-made edgings are eschewed by many
lace-workers, the plain, loose-woven linen braid of various widths and
qualities being alone acceptable to experienced hands.

But all ladies do not care to be at the trouble of edging the braid, and
will find Nos. 426, 428, 430, and 431 very useful. No. 429 is a plain
linen braid with a vandyked edge, which works out very prettily. No. 431
is an edged braid with open holes, in imitation of the point lace work
of the fifteenth century.

Point lace cords resemble the satin stitch embroidery in their close,
regular smoothness; the price is 1s. per hank, and they are of various
thicknesses, from the size of a coarse crochet thread up to that of a
thick piping cord. These cords are used to ornament the braid, and are
closely sewn on the braid, following its every outline, and serve as
_beading_ to the edging, being always sewn on the outer edge alone. The
finer kinds of this cord are used in place of braid where very light
work is needed, as in the point lace alphabet which forms the
frontispiece of this work. Directions for laying on the cord when
employed as braid are given on page 500. When used as a finish only, and
to impart the raised appearance of Venice and Spanish lace, it is fixed
on the braid by plain, close sewing. The thread used should be
Mecklenburg linen thread; that of Messrs. Walter Evans and Co. we
strongly recommend as being of pure linen, washing and wearing well; it
is pleasant to work with, from the regularity and evenness of the make.
The numbers run thus:--2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 30, 36,
and 40--and will be found adapted for every kind of lace stitch. No. 2
is the coarsest, No. 40 the finest, size.

In working point lace the following directions must be attended to:
Begin at the left hand, and work from left to right, when not otherwise
directed, as in reverse rows. Before cutting off the braid run a few
stitches across it to prevent it widening. Joins should be avoided, but
when a join is indispensable, stitch the braid together, open and turn
back the ends, and stitch each portion down separately. When passing the
thread from one part to another, run along the centre of the braid,
allowing the stitches to show as little as possible. In commencing, make
a few stitches, leaving the end of the thread on the wrong side and
cutting it off afterwards. In fastening off, make a tight button-hole
stitch, run on three stitches, bring the needle out at the back, and cut
off.

Having now completed our list of materials, we can proceed to lay on the
braid.

[Illustration: 442.--Mode of Placing the Braid.]

TO PLACE THE BRAID.--No. 442 shows the design traced upon paper or
tracing cloth, and lightly tacked to a foundation of leather or toile
cirée. Run on a straight line of braid for the lower edge, with fine
stitches, working as shown from left to right. Take another piece of
braid, or the other end of the same piece, and begin to lay the braid by
"running" stitches in its centre, keeping it as smooth and even as
possible. The outer edge presents no difficulty, but the inner edge will
not lie evenly without being drawn in by a needle and thread, as
follows:--Thread a No. 9 needle with No. 12 Mecklenburg thread about 20
inches long, fasten the thread to one point, and insert the needle in
and out of the edge of the braid, as if for fine gathering; this thread
when drawn up will keep the braid in its place. Two or three fastening
off stitches should be worked when each circle, half circle, or rounded
curve of a pattern is finished, as the drawing or gathering thread
remains in the work, and forms an important, though unseen, part of its
structure.

As much of the beauty of point lace depends upon the manner of placing
the braid, ladies cannot bestow too much pains upon this part of the
work, which is a little troublesome to beginners. Many fancy shops now
undertake this braid-placing for ladies, who can have their own pattern
braided and commenced or braided alone at trifling expense. Among these
may be mentioned the following houses:--Goubaud, 30, Henrietta-street,
Covent-garden. Boutillier, Oxford-street, W.

The stitches used in point lace may be divided into--

STITCHES PROPER, or _points_.

CONNECTING BARS.

FINISHING EDGINGS.

WHEELS, ROSETTES.

The term point lace, or lace stitches (_points_), has of late been
applied to every stitch executed with Mecklenburg thread, and many
stitches are erroneously named by modern writers. As there are more than
one hundred stitches employed in this beautiful art, much study and
opportunity of seeing specimens of old point lace is required to give a
novice any idea of the various kinds of point lace; but by attention to
the following stitches the rudiments of the art may be easily acquired
and very beautiful lace produced.

The first stitch is POINT DE BRUXELLES, or Brussels lace stitch. This
stitch, as may be clearly seen in illustration No. 433, is a simple
button-hole stitch worked loosely and with great regularity. The whole
beauty of Brussels lace depends upon the evenness of the stitches. This
stitch is sometimes employed as an edging, but is more often worked in
rows backwards and forwards, either as a groundwork or to fill spaces,
as in the point lace collar, No. 496.

[Illustration: 433. Point de Bruxelles (Brussels Lace).]

[Illustration: 434.--Point de Bruxelles (Brussels Lace Worked in Rows).]

Brussels Point is the foundation of nearly all the lace stitches.


POINT DE VENISE (Venetian or Venice Point) is worked from left to right,
like Brussels point. Work one loose button-hole, and in this stitch
work four button-hole stitches tightly drawn up, then work another loose
button-hole stitch, then four more tight button-hole stitches in the
loose one, repeat to the end of the row, and fasten off.

[Illustration: 435.--Point de Venise (Venice Point).]


[Illustration: 436.--Petit Point de Venise (Little Venice Point).]

PETIT POINT DE VENISE (Little Venice Point) is worked in the same manner
as Point de Venise, but one tight stitch only is worked in each loose
button-hole stitch. This is a most useful stitch for filling small
spaces.


[Illustration: 437.--Point d'Espagne (Spanish Point).]

No. 437.--POINT D'ESPAGNE (Spanish Point) is worked from left to right
as follows:--Insert the needle in the edge of the braid, keeping the
thread turned to the right, bringing it out inside the loop formed by
the thread (see illustration No. 437); the needle must pass from the
back of the loop through it. Pass the needle under the stitch and bring
it out in front, thus twice twisting the thread, which produces the
cord-like appearance of this stitch. At the end of each row fasten to
the braid and return by sewing back, inserting the needle once in every
open stitch.


[Illustration: 438.--Close Point d'Espagne (Close Spanish Point).]

No. 438.--POINT D'ESPAGNE (Close) is worked in the same way as open
point d'Espagne, but so closely as to only allow the needle to pass
through in the next row. This stitch is also worked from left to right;
fasten to the braid at the end of each row, and sew back to the left
again.


No. 439.--TREBLE POINT D'ESPAGNE is worked in exactly the same way as
the open and close point d'Espagne, as may be seen in illustration No.
439.

Three close stitches, one open, three close to the end of each row. Sew
back, and in the next row begin one open, three close, one open, then
close to the end; repeat the rows as far as necessary, taking care that
the close and open stitches follow in regular order. Diamonds, stars,
and various patterns may be formed with this stitch.

[Illustration: 439.--Treble Point d'Espagne (Treble Spanish Point).]


No. 440.--POINT DE GRECQUE is begun from left to right, is worked
backwards and forwards, and is begun by one stitch in loose point de
Bruxelles and three of close point d'Espagne; then one Brussels, three
point d'Espagne to the end of the row; in returning work back in the
same manner.

[Illustration: 440.--Point de Grecque (Grecian Point).]


No. 441. POINT DE VALENCIENNES (Valenciennes Stitch).--This stitch
appears complicated, but is really easy to work. Begin at the left hand
and work six point de Bruxelles stitches at unequal distance, every
alternate stitch being larger. 2nd row: Upon the first large or long
stitch work 9 close button-hole stitches, then 1 short point de
Bruxelles stitch under the one above, then 9 close stitches, and so on
to the end of row (right to left).

[Illustration: 441.--Point de Valenciennes (Valenciennes Stitch).]

3rd row: 5 close button-hole in the 9 of previous row, 1 short point de
Bruxelles, 2 close in the Bruxelles stitch, 1 short point de Bruxelles,
5 close, 1 short point de Bruxelles, 2 close, l short, 5 close, 1 short,
and repeat. 4th row: 5 close, 1 short point de Bruxelles, 2 close, 1
short, 5 close, 1 short, 2 close, l short, and repeat. Continue the rows
until sufficient of the pattern is worked.


[Illustration: 442.--Point d'Alençon, with Twisted Stitch.]

No. 442. POINT D'ALENÇON.--This stitch is used to fill up narrow spaces
where great lightness is required. Point d'Alençon is worked under and
over in alternate stitches, like hem stitch. Nos. 442 and 443 show point
d'Alençon. In No. 442 a twisted stitch is worked over the plain point
d'Alençon, which is clearly shown in No. 443; this twist is made by
passing the thread three times round each plain bar, and working the
knot shown in illustration No. 442 over _both_ strands of the bar.

[Illustration: 443.--Point d'Alençon, with Button-hole Stitch.]

The POINT D'ALENÇON No. 443 is a festoon of close button-hole stitch
worked over the plain bars.


[Illustration: 444.--Point d'Angleterre (Open English Lace).]

No. 444.--POINT D'ANGLETERRE (Open English Lace).--Open English Lace is
thus worked:--Cover the space to be filled in with lines of thread about
one-eighth of an inch apart, then form cross lines, intersecting those
already made and passing alternately under and over them; work a rosette
on every spot where two lines cross, by working over and under the two
lines about 16 times round, then twist the thread twice round the
groundwork thread, and begin to form another rosette at the crossing
threads. No. 445 shows this stitch much enlarged.

[Illustration: 445.--Point d'Angleterre (Enlarged).]


No. 446,--POINT TURQUE (Turkish Stitch).--This easy and effective stitch
looks well for filling either large or small spaces; the thread employed
should be varied in thickness according to the size of the space to be
filled. 1st row: Work a loop, bringing the thread from right to left,
passing the needle through the twist and through the loop, draw up tight
and repeat. 2nd row: 1 straight thread from right to left. 3rd row: Work
the same as first using the straight thread in place of the braid, and
passing the needle through the loop of previous row, as shown in
illustration No. 446.

[Illustration: 446.--Point Turque.]


No. 447.--CORDOVA STITCH is useful for varying other stitches. It
resembles the point de reprise of guipure d'art, and is worked in a
similar manner over and under the side of squares formed by straight and
parallel lines. (See No. 448.)

[Illustration: 447.--Point de Cordova (Cordova Stitch).]


No. 448.--POINT DE REPRISE.--This stitch is worked by darning over and
under two threads, forming a triangle. The space is filled by parallel
and cross-way bars, placed at equal distances, and on the triangles thus
produced point de reprise is worked.

[Illustration: 448.--Point de Reprise.]


No. 449.--POINT BRABANÇON (Brabançon Lace) is worked as follows:--Left
to right. 1st row: 1 long loose, 1 short loose, point de Bruxelles
alternately to end of row. 2nd row: 7 tight point de Bruxelles in the 1
long loose stitch, 2 short loose point de Bruxelles in the short loose
stitch of previous row, repeat. 3rd row: Same as first.

[Illustration: 449.--Point Brabançon (Brabançon Lace).]


[Illustration: 450.--Point de Fillet (Net Groundwork Stitch).]

[Illustration: 451.--Point de Fillet and Point de Reprise.]

No. 450 is used for groundwork where Brussels net is not imitated, and
is very effective. It is begun in the corner or crosswise of the space
to be filled. A loose point de Bruxelles stitch is first taken and
fastened to the braid, then passed twice through the braid as shown in
illustration, and worked in rows backwards and forwards as follows:--1
point de Bruxelles stitch; before proceeding to the next stitch pass the
needle _under_ the knot, _over_ the thread, and again _under_ it, as
shown in illustration No. 450. This stitch is very quickly worked. No.
451 shows point de fillet applied in filling a space, with a few
stitches of point de reprise worked upon this pretty groundwork.


No. 452.--POINT DE TULLE.--This stitch is used as a groundwork for very
fine work, and is worked in rows backwards and forwards in the same
stitch as open point d'Espagne, page 457. When this is completed the
work is gone over a second time, by inserting the needle under one
twisted bar, bringing it out and inserting it at +, and bringing it out
again at the dot. This produces a close double twist which is very
effective.

[Illustration: 452.--Point de Tulle.]


No. 453.--MECHLIN LACE (Mechlin Wheels).--This is one of the prettiest
stitches in point lace, but also one of the most difficult to work
correctly. It is thus worked:--Work a number of diagonal bars in
button-hole stitch on a single thread in one direction, then begin in
the opposite side the same way, and work 5 or 6 stitches past the spot
where the two lines cross, pass the thread round the cross twice under
and over the thread to form a circle. Work in button-hole stitch half
one quarter, make a dot by putting a fine pin in the loop instead of
drawing the thread tight, and work 3 button-hole stitches in the loop
held open by the pin, then take it out, and continue as before.
Beginners will do well to omit the dot, leaving the loop only on the
wheel. Mechlin wheels are also worked in rows upon horizontal and
parallel lines of thread.

[Illustration: 453.--Mechlin Lace Wheels.]


No. 454.--ESCALIER LACE.--This useful lace may be varied in pattern to
any extent by placing the open stitches in any desired order; it then
takes the name of diamond or Antwerp lace, according to the design. True
escalier lace is made by working nine button-hole stitches close
together; then miss 3--that is, work none in the space that 3 stitches
would occupy--work 9, miss 3 as before to the end of row, begin the 2nd
row 3 stitches from the end, to cause the open spaces to fall in
diagonal lines--a succession of steps or stairs (_escalier_), which
gives name to this stitch.

[Illustration: 454.--Escalier Lace Worked in Diamonds.]


No. 455.--SPANISH POINT LACE is adorned with highly-raised scrolls,
flowers, &c. This is effected by working over an underlay of coarse
white thread or over fine white linen cords. The wheels are worked by
winding soft coarse linen thread round pencils or smooth knitting-pins
of various sizes, and working over the circle thus obtained a succession
of close button-hole stitches. These wheels are sewn on to the lace when
completed. The groundwork of Spanish lace is usually worked in what are
called Raleigh Bars (see page 477), but this lace has sometimes for
groundwork point de Venise. An easy mode of working this handsome lace
is to trace the design upon very fine good linen; raise the thick parts
as above directed, and embroider the whole in fine thick scalloped
button-hole stitch; fill the ground with Raleigh bars, or, as shown in
illustration No. 455, in treble point de Venise, and cut away the linen
from beneath the groundwork.

[Illustration: 455.--Spanish Point Lace (Worked à l'Anglaise).]



WHEELS AND ROSETTES.


Wheels or rosettes are used to fill up circles, or in combination to
form lace. The simplest is--

THE SORRENTO WHEEL.--Nos. 456 and 457.--This is worked by fastening the
thread in the pattern to be filled up by means of the letters. Fasten it
first at the place _a_, then at the place _b_, carrying it back to the
middle of the first formed bar by winding it round, fasten the cotton at
the place _c_, carrying it back again to the centre by winding it round
the bar, and so on; then work over and under the bars thus formed as in
English lace. See page 462, and illustrations Nos. 456 and 457.

[Illustration: 456 and 457.--Sorrento Wheels.]


No. 458.--ENGLISH WHEEL.--This is worked in the same manner as the
Sorrento wheel, but instead of _winding_ the thread over and under the
bars, the needle is inserted under each bar and brought out again
between the thread and the last stitch; this gives a kind of button-hole
stitch, and gives the square, firm appearance possessed by this wheel.

[Illustration: 458.--English Wheel.]


No. 459.--ROSETTE IN POINT D'ANGLETERRE.--This rosette is worked in a
somewhat similar manner to the wheel above described, the difference
being that after each stitch passed round and under the bars, the thread
is passed loosely round in the reverse direction, as shown in
illustration No. 459, before proceeding to make the next stitch.

[Illustration: 459.--Rosette in Raised Point d'Angleterre.]


No. 460 is a rosette or star which is used to fill circles of braid, and
forms the centre of many modern point lace patterns. It is worked upon
a pattern traced and pricked in small holes at equal distances. Two
threads are employed, one coarse tracing thread, the other of finer
thread. The coarse thread is laid on thus:--Pass the needle containing
the fine thread, No. 12, through one of the pricked holes, over the
tracing thread and back through the same hole; repeat, following the
traced outline until the whole of the coarse thread is laid over the
outline, then work over in tight button-hole stitch with picots or
purls, as on the Raleigh bars (see page 477). This mode of laying on
tracing or outlining thread is also applied to fine braid and to point
lace cord, as in the alphabet No. 400 (see page 500).

[Illustration: 460.--Rosette for centre of Point Lace Circles.]



BARS.


The word _Bar_ is applied to the various stitches used to connect the
various parts of point lace work, and the beauty of the work depends
greatly upon the class of bar and its suitability to the lace stitches
used. The simplest bar is--

No. 461.--THE SORRENTO BAR.--It is worked from right to left, a straight
thread being carried across and fastened with a stitch. The return row
consists of a simple twist under and over the straight thread; three of
these bars are usually placed close together at equal distances between
each group. The thread is sewn over the braid in passing from one spot
to another.

[Illustration: 461.--Sorrento Bars.]

[Illustration: 462.--Sorrento Bars.]

Sorrento bars are also applied as shown in illustration No. 462.


No. 463.--D ALENCON BARS are worked upon point de Bruxelles edging, and
are only applied to the inner part of a pattern, never being used as
groundwork bars. The thread is merely passed three times over and under
the point de Bruxelles stitches, the length of these bars being
regulated by the space to be filled; when the third bar is completed a
tight point de Bruxelles stitch is used to fasten off the bar, the
thread is passed through the next point de Bruxelles stitch, and a
second bar begun.

[Illustration: 463.--D'Alençon Bars.]


[Illustration: 464.--Venetian Bar.]

No. 464.--THE VENETIAN BAR is so simple that it hardly needs
description. It is worked over two straight threads in reverse
button-hole stitch. No. 465 shows the Venetian bar applied as the
"veining" of leaf, and worked upon Sorrento bars.

[Illustration: 465.--Venetian Bar.]


No. 466.--VENETIAN BARS are worked so as to form squares, triangles,
&c., in button-hole stitch upon a straight thread. The arrow in the
illustration points to the direction for working the next.

[Illustration: 466.--- Plain Venetian Bars.]


No. 467.--BARS OF POINT D'ANGLETERRE.--These bars may be worked singly
or to fill up a space, as in illustration. Work rosettes as in point
d'Angleterre, page 461; when each rosette is finished twist the thread
up the foundation thread to the top, fasten with one stitch, then pass
it under the parallel line running through the centre and over into the
opposite braid; repeat on each side of each rosette, inserting the
threads as in illustration.

[Illustration: 467.--Bars of Point d'Angleterre.]


No. 468.--POINT DE VENISE BARS (EDGED).--Begin at the right hand and
stretch a line of thread to the left side of the braid, fastening it
with one tight stitch of point de Bruxelles. Upon this line work a
succession of tight point de Bruxelles stitches. In every third stitch
work one point de Venise stitch.

[Illustration: 468.--Point de Venise Bars (Edged).]


No. 469.--We now come to the most important feature of BARS--the _dot,
picot_, or _purl_, for by all these names it is known. This dot is
worked in various ways upon different lace bars. Dotted point de Venise
bars are worked as follow:--

[Illustration: 469.--Dotted Point de Venise Bars.]

Stretch the thread from right to left, on this work five tight stitches
of point de Bruxelles, then insert a pin in this last stitch to hold it
open and loose, pass the needle under the loose stitch and over the
thread, as clearly shown in illustration No. 469, and in this loop work
three tight point de Bruxelles stitches. Then work five more stitches,
and repeat to end of row.


[Illustration: 470.--Picot or Dot on Sorrento Bar.]

No. 470 shows a dot or picot upon a Sorrento bar worked between rows of
point de Bruxelles, three twisted stitches being worked into the loop
left by the twisted thread; this forms a picot resembling satin stitch
in appearance.


Nos. 471 and 472.--RALEIGH BARS are worked over a foundation or network
of coarse thread, twisted in places so as to more easily fall into the
desired form.

[Illustration: 471.--Raleigh Bars.]

[Illustration 472.--Network for Working Raleigh Bars.]


By following the numbering from No. 1 to 21, in No. 472, a square place
may be easily filled, and portions of this arrangement applied to form
groundwork of any shape desired. Upon this groundwork tight point de
Bruxelles stitches are worked, and the dot worked upon these in one of
the following ways:--

DOT or PICOT.--1st Mode: Five tight point de Bruxelles stitches, one
loose point de Bruxelles; pass the needle under the loop and over the
thread, as shown in point de Venise bars No. 469, draw up, leaving a
small open loop as in tatting. Work five tight point de Bruxelles and
repeat. 2nd Mode: Proceed as above, but instead of continuing the tight
stitches work two or three tight stitches in the loop thus formed, and
repeat. 3rd Mode: Work four tight point de Bruxelles stitches, one
loose, through which pass the needle point, wind the thread three or
four times round the point, as shown in illustration No. 473, press the
thumb tightly on this, and draw the needle and thread through the
twists. This is a quick mode of making the picot, and imitates most
closely the real Spanish lace.


Illustration No. 473 also shows how this stitch may be applied as a
_regular_ groundwork, but the beauty of old point groundwork bars is the
variety of form.

[Illustration: 473.--Third mode of making Picots or Dots.]



EDGES AND PURL FINISH.


The correct edging of lace is a most important part of this art, and
care should be taken to work a proper edge for each kind of lace.
Sorrento edging should be worked upon Limoges lace. Spanish lace
requires a full rich edge, as shown in No. 478, &c. The simplest edge is
point de Bruxelles, which is worked somewhat like the stitch No. 433,
and is secured by a knot worked in the braid. Many lace-workers omit
this knot.

[Illustration: 474.--Point de Bruxelles Edging.]


No. 475.--SORRENTO EDGING is worked with one short and one long stitch
alternately.

[Illustration: 475.--Sorrento Edging.]


No. 476.--POINT DE VENISE is worked precisely like that stitch (see page
456), three and even four stitches being worked in the loop.

[Illustration: 476.--Point de Venise Edging.]


No. 477.--POINT D'ANGLETERRE EDGING is worked in point de Bruxelles, the
thread being again drawn through the braid before proceeding to the next
stitch. This edging is strong and useful.

[Illustration: 477.--Point d'Angleterre Edging.]

No. 478.--POINT D'ESPAGNE EDGING.--This stitch is easily worked. Insert
the point of the needle through the braid and wind the thread round it
20 times, draw the needle through these windings and draw the picot
tight, sew over the braid the space of 3 stitches, and repeat.

[Illustration: 478.--Point d'Espagne Edging.]


No. 479.--ANTWERP EDGE.--This edge is only a variety of point
d'Angleterre edging, and differs only in the mode of making the knot;
the thread is passed over, under, and through the loop formed by the
point de Bruxelles lace.

[Illustration: 479.--Antwerp Edge.]

NOTE.--It will be observed that the stitches here given are much
enlarged for the sake of clearness in showing details.



PATTERNS.


No. 480.--_Star in Point Lace_.

Materials: Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No.
20.

Trace the outline upon paper or leather, lay the braid on as directed.
Work the centre in Sorrento bars, and on these work a rosette in point
d'Angleterre, the edge in point d'Angleterre edging, and the wheels in
open English lace.

[Illustration: 480.--Star in Point Lace.]

       *       *       *       *       *

No. 481.--_Medallion in Point Lace_.

Materials: Linen Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg
thread No. 14.

This medallion is useful for cravat ends and for a number of purposes,
as trimming for sachets, dresses, &c. Having placed the braid as before
directed, work an English rosette in the centre, fill in the ground with
point de fillet or with point de Bruxelles. An edging of Spanish point
completes this pretty medallion.

[Illustration: 481.--Medallion in Point Lace.]

       *       *       *       *       *

No. 482.--_Point Lace Border_.

Materials: Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No.
12.

This border represents the completed work shown on p. 454. A point
d'Angleterre rosette is worked in each circle. The plain braid is
edged by Sorrento edging. Venice bars are worked above the trimming, and
treble point de Venise edges the border.

[Illustration: 482.--Point Lace Border.]

       *       *       *       *       *

No. 483.--_Point Lace Border_.

Materials: Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No.
10.

This border is both easily and quickly worked in Sorrento bars. The edge
is worked in two rows of point de Bruxelles.

[Illustration: 483.--Point Lace Border.]

       *       *       *       *       *

No. 484.--_Insertion in Limoges Lace_.

Materials: Plain linen braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg
thread No. 14.

This insertion will be found very useful, being so quickly worked.
Edge the braid with Sorrento edging, fill up with bars and plain point
d'Alençon and Sorrento wheels, No. 456.

[Illustration: 484.--Insertion in Limoges Lace.]

       *       *       *       *       *

No. 485--_Point Lace Border for Handkerchief._

Materials: Fine lace braid or cord; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Mecklenburg thread No. 24.

This border is suited for a handkerchief or for trimming a square
bodice. The braid is not tacked on by stitches running through the
centre, as is usual in point lace braids, but sewn on by passing a
thread from underneath over the braid and out through the same hole, as
is done by lace-workers with a thick thread; this forms the design. The
stitches employed in this pattern are Raleigh bars, which connect the
work; Sorrento edging, which finishes the whole outline; English
rosettes filling the open spaces. Point lace cord may be used for this
in place of braid.

[Illustration: 485. Point Lace Border for Handkerchief.]

       *       *       *       *       *

No. 486.--_Star-Centre for Toilette Cushion in Point Lace_.

Materials: Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread Nos.
16 and 12.

[Illustration: 486.--Star-centre for Toilette Cushion in Point Lace.]

This beautiful star will be found useful for other purposes than as a
toilette cushion cover, and is worked as follows:--English rosette in
centre; Sorrento wheels in the 4 ovals, worked with No. 12 thread; point
de Bruxelles ground, worked with No. 16; braid edged by dotted Venetian
edges. The eight spaces may be filled with 2 or 4 contrasting
stitches, taking care that they contrast well, and are placed
alternately, and worked in No. 12.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 487.--Cravat End in Point Lace.]

487.--_Cravat End in Point Lace_.

Materials: Fine braid: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread
No. 12.

This cravat is worked in Sorrento wheels, point d'Alençon
bars, and Sorrento edging.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 488.--Point Lace Edging.]

[Illustration: 489.--Point Lace Edging.]

488 _and_ 489.--_Point Lace Edgings_.

Materials: Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread Nos.
12 and 16.

These edgings can be used as a finish to insertions and other trimmings
or for edging couvrettes. No. 488 is worked with Sorrento wheels; the
edge in two rows of point de Bruxelles, a straight thread being drawn
from the end to the beginning of each scallop over which the second row
is worked. No. 489 is worked with the same materials in treble point de
Venise, edged by the same, and finished off with a row of point de
Bruxelles, the upper edge being worked in the same way.

       *       *       *       *       *

490.--_Design in Point Lace for Collar, Lappet, &c._

Materials: Linen braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg
thread Nos. 10 and 16.

This design may be used for a variety of purposes, and is extremely
effective. The principal stitches required are given at the sides of the
pattern. _a_ is Valenciennes lace, _b_ Brussels net, _c_ Venetian
spotted, _d_ Sorrento edging, _e_ Mechlin wheel, _f_ English rosette,
_g_ Raleigh bars.

[Illustration: 490.--Design in Point Lace for Collar, Lappet, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

491.--_Oval for Cravats, &c._

Materials: Point lace cord; muslin; embroidery cotton; Messrs. Walter
Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread Nos. 14 and 18.

This beautiful oval is worked in point lace and embroidery. This is
begun from the centre on the muslin by over-casting the space filled by a
wheel. The eyelet-holes are then worked, and the satin stitch ornament
raised and prepared for working. The edge, of point lace cord, is then
laid on, and the under portion edged in tight and open point de
Bruxelles, the centre of the circles being worked in point de Bruxelles.
The light groundwork is worked entirely in Mechlin wheels, the satin
stitch being worked when these are completed. This pattern can be
enlarged and applied to many purposes. The muslin is cut away when the
whole work is finished.

[Illustration: 491.--Oval Pattern for Ornamenting Cravats, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

492.--_Point Lace Trimming for Square Bodice_.

Materials: Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No.
12 or 20.

We give two sizes of thread, as this design is capable of many uses, and
the size of the thread differs with these. The pattern is worked in
English rosettes and bars (see No. 467). No. 488 edging looks well with
this pattern.

[Illustration: 492.--Point Lace Trimming for Square Bodice.]

       *       *       *       *       *

493--_Point Lace Collar._

Materials: Fine braid or cord; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Mecklenburg thread No. 22.

[Illustration: 493--Point Lace Collar.]

Set on the braid or cord by passing a thread through a hole pricked
in the pattern over the braid and out again through the same hole. Edge
the braid with point de Bruxelles, the design being filled by Mechlin
wheels, Sorrento wheels, point de feston, and the mixed stitch shown in
No. 494, which is composed of d'Alençon and Sorrento bars, and is easily
worked. Those who cannot work Mechlin wheels easily, can substitute
close English, as shown in illustration No. 495. The bars are Sorrento.

[Illustration: 494.--D'Alençon and Sorrento Bars.]

[Illustration: 495.--Close English Wheels.]

       *       *       *       *       *
[Illustration: 496--Point Lace Collar.]

496.--_Point Lace Collar._

Materials: Fine braid or cord; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Mecklenburg thread No. 22.

This collar is worked in the same way as No. 493, though the stitches
vary. The Grecian line is worked in point de reprise, the pattern in
close English wheels, point de reprise, point de Bruxelles, English
rosettes, and Raleigh bars.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 497.--Point Lace Lappet.]

497.--_Point Lace Lappet._

Materials: Braid; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No.
16 or 24, according to the fineness required.

This lappet is exceedingly pretty. It is composed of the following
stitches:--Point d'Alençon, point de tulle, English rosettes, Sorrento
bars, d'Alençon bars, dotted Venise bars, and the fancy stitch point
d'Anvers, which is not a true point lace stitch, but which is much
employed in modern point.

[Illustration: 497.--Point Lace Lappet.]

[Illustration: 498.--Point d'Anvers.]

[Illustration: 499.--Point Grecque.]

Point Grecque is another useful variety of fancy stitch, and so easily
worked as to be a favourite stitch with beginners.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 500.--Letter A in Point Lace.]

[Illustration: 501.--Letter A Enlarged.]

_500 to 502.--Alphabet in Point Lace. (See endpapers.)_

Materials: Point lace cord; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg
thread No. 36.

This alphabet is useful for marking pocket-handkerchiefs, and for
initials for sachets, &c. The cord is laid upon the pattern and pricked
out by passing a thread up through a hole over the cord, and back
through the same hole; then pass on to the next hole, and repeat. The
holes should be about an eighth of an inch apart, or nearer when the
pattern is finely convoluted. The letters are worked in point de
Bruxelles, point d'Alençon, and dotted Sorrento bars. No. 501 shows the
letter A greatly enlarged, to show the mode of working.

       *       *       *       *       *

TABLE OF THREADS SUITED TO VARIOUS
ARTICLES WORKED IN POINT LACE.

|----------------------------------|-------------------|
|Caps                              |    36   "   "     |
|Collars                           |    30   "   "     |
|Couvrettes                        |    2   4   6      |
|Cravats                           |    18  30   "     |
|D'Oyleys                          |     8  10  12     |
|Dress Trimmimgs                   |    22  30   "     |
|Edgings                           |    14  30   "     |
|Handkerchiefs                     |    30  36  40     |
|Insertions, coarse                |    6   8  12      |
|   "        fine                  |    24  30   "     |
|----------------------------------|-------------------|

Point lace cord runs about twelve yards to the hank.

Point lace edged braid runs thirty-six yards on cards.

Plain linen twelve yards in each hank.

       *       *       *       *       *




GUIPURE D'ART.



INSTRUCTIONS AND PATTERNS

IN

GUIPURE D'ART.

       *       *       *       *       *

Ancient Guipure was a lace made of thin vellum, covered with gold,
silver, or silk thread, and the word Guipure derives its name from the
silk when thus twisted round vellum being called by that name. In
process of time the use of vellum was discontinued, and a cotton
material replaced it. Guipure lace was called _intelle à cartisane_ in
England in the sixteenth century. Various modern laces are called
Guipure, but the word is misapplied, since Guipure lace is that kind
only where one thread is twisted round another thread or another
substance, as in the ancient Guipure d'Art.

In every design where lace can be introduced, Guipure d'Art will be
found useful. It looks particularly well when mounted upon quilted silk
or satin. The squares, when worked finely, look well as toilet-cushions,
or, if worked in coarser thread, make admirable couvrettes, and as
covers for eider-down silk quilts are very elegant. Guipure squares
should be connected by guipure lace, crochet, or tatting, or they may be
edged with narrow guipure lace and joined at the corners only when
placed over coloured silk or satin; thus arranged, a sofa-cushion
appears in alternate squares of plain and lace-covered silk; a ruche of
ribbon and fall of lace to correspond completes this pretty mounting.

Not one of the least important attractions of Guipure d'Art is the speed
with which it is worked, and the ease with which fresh patterns are
designed by skilful workers.

GUIPURE D'ART is an imitation of the celebrated ancient Guipure Lace,
and is worked in raised and intersected patterns upon a square network
of linen thread, Mecklenburg thread of various sizes being used for this
purpose. The needles employed are blunt, and have large eyes, to admit
the linen thread.

Materials required: One frame of wire covered with silk ribbon; one
square of Mecklenburg thread net (_fillet_), either coarse or fine;
Mecklenburg thread; netting-needles and meshes of various sizes.

The netted foundation, or "_fillet_," upon which this elegant work is
embroidered, can be made by ladies very easily, and at much less cost
than when bought ready made.

The square is worked by netting with coarse No. 2 or fine No.10 thread
over a mesh measuring three-quarters of an inch or more, in rows
backwards and forwards. Begin with 2 stitches, and increase 1 at the end
of every row till you have one more stitch than is required for the
number of holes. Thus, if a square of 26 holes is required, continue to
increase up to 27 stitches, then decrease 1 at the end of every row till
2 stitches only remain. The last 2 stitches are knotted together without
forming a fresh stitch.

The completed foundation is laced upon the frame, taking the lacing
cotton through the double edge formed by the increased and decreased
stitches. If the four corners of the netting are tied at each corner of
the frame before beginning the lacing, that operation is greatly
facilitated. The netting should be laced as tightly as possible, it
being far easier to darn on than when loose.

[Illustration: 503.--Frame for Guipure d'Art.]

Ladies who wish to excel in working guipure d'art should practise each
of the stitches until they attain perfect regularity and quickness in
their execution. Two or three hours devoted to this in the first
instance will not be time wasted, as the most elaborate pattern will be
worked with ease as soon as the stitches are mastered.

The Mecklenburg thread of Messrs. Walter Evans and Co., of Derby, will
be found a better colour than any other, as it closely resembles the
shade of the ancient guipure lace.

It is sold only in spools of 200 yards each, and the numbers run as
follow; No. 2, 4, 6, 8, lo, 12, 16, 20; No. 2 being the coarsest, and
No. 20 the finest.

The principal stitches used in guipure d'art are POINT D'ESPRIT, POINT
DE TOILE, POINT DE FESTON, POINT DE REPRISE, POINT DE BRUXELLES, and
WHEELS and STARS. POINT D'ESPRIT is worked with finer cotton than the
foundation, say No. 10 on a foundation of No. 6. It consists of a
succession of small loops, as will be seen clearly in the illustration.
The learner should begin from the mark * No. 503, and working a row of
loops the length required, turn the frame and work loops on the opposite
half of each square intersecting the first worked loops in the centre of
each intervening bar of netting. A careful examination of Nos. 503 and
506 will explain this more clearly than is possible in words.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 504.--Point d'Esprit.]

POINT DE TOILE, or LINEN STITCH, is plain darning under and over each
thread; this forms a fine close groundwork, and is much used in guipure
d'art. Care should be taken to keep the same number of stitches in each
square, both along and across; the number of threads shown in
illustration No. 504 is 4 only, but 6 and even 8 are used in many netted
foundations in fine patterns.

[Illustration: 505.--Point de Toile.]

       *       *       *       *       *

POINT DE FESTON is worked by a series of overcast stitches, as seen by
illustration 506, which clearly shows the manner of working. The frame
is turned at each stitch, the stitches are taken across the squares, and
increase in length at the top of the square.

[Illustration: 506.--Point de Feston.]

       *       *       *       *       *

POINT DE REPRISE, or DARNING, is worked by stretching 2 or 3 threads
over 1, or 2, or more squares. The thread is darned over and under, and
the needle used to arrange the last stitch while passing through to form
the next. This stitch is very easily acquired. It is always worked with
coarser thread than the foundation; No. 2 thread should be employed for
a coarse groundwork. No. 510 shows this stitch used to form stars,
figures, &c.

[Illustration: 507--Point de Reprise.]

[Illustration: 508.--Leaf.]

       *       *       *       *       *

POINT DE BRUXELLES, as shown on pages 506 and 507, is a kind of loose
button-hole stitch, and is used for forming various patterns and for
filling up squares. It also forms "leaves," when the number of stitches
is decreased each row until the leaf finishes off in a point. Nos. 509
and 510 clearly show this stitch.

[Illustration: 509.--Point de Bruxelles.]

[Illustration: 510.--Point de Bruxelles.]

       *       *       *       *       *

WHEELS are easy to work, and are begun in the centre. Four threads are
taken across, as shown in design No. 511; the thread is twisted in
bringing it back to the centre, and the wheel formed by passing the
thread under and over the netting and the crossing threads. It is
fastened off on the back of the several wheels.

[Illustration: 511.--Wheel (commenced).]

[Illustration: 512.--Wheel.]

Wheel No. 513 is a square wheel, and is worked in the same manner, with
the addition of point d'esprit loops, through which, and under and over
the cross-twisted threads, 4 or 5 rows of thread are passed.

[Illustration: 513.--Square Wheel.]

[Illustration: 514.--Wheel larger than its real size.]

       *       *       *       *       *

STARS are of various form, as shown in Nos. 516, 517, 518, 519, and 520.

No. 516 is worked in point de feston (see page 507) round a single
square hole, which is filled in by a small wheel or rosette.

No. 517 is worked in point de feston and point de Bruxelles,
alternately round a centre simply crossed by point d'esprit threads.

[Illustration: 516.--Star.]

No. 518 is more elaborate, and is worked thus:--Begin at the place
marked _a_; twist the linen thread 3 times round the nearest thread,
draw it on to the knot _b_; repeat this 3 times, following the order of
the letters; twist the linen thread also between the threads, as can be
seen from the illustration, and fasten it underneath the knot _a_; for
the wheel fasten on the cotton afresh and work the remaining pattern in
darning stitch (point de reprise).

[Illustration: 517.--Star.]

[Illustration: 518.--Star.]

No. 520 consists of a double cross formed by twisted loops of linen
thread. Copy these loops exactly from illustration 520 One part of the
straight cross lies underneath, then comes the slanting cross, and
lastly, the other part of the straight cross.

[Illustration: 519.--Detail of Star.]

[Illustration: 520.--Star.]

In the centre the loops of linen thread are fastened with two rounds of
stitches. (See illustration 520).

OVERCAST STITCH is worked like embroidery overcast, and forms the stems
of the flowers and leaves of guipure d'art; it is worked over one or two
coarse threads. It is employed in No. 530, and forms the triangles in
the centre of the middle squares.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 521.--Insertion in Guipure d'Art.]

521.--_Insertion in Guipure d'Art._

Materials: Guipure frame netting of 6 holes wide; Mecklenburg thread No.
8 or 10; needle No. 7.

For the netted foundation, which is six holes wide, begin at one corner
with 2 stitches, work 5 rows, at the end of each of which increase 1
stitch, continue to work the strip with the same number of stitches,
alternately decreasing 1 at the end of one row and increasing 1 at the
end of the next. For decreasing net 2 stitches together, for increasing
net 2 stitches in the same hole. When the strip is sufficiently long,
complete it by decreasing in the same proportion as the increasing at
the beginning. As the pattern is so clearly shown in the illustration,
it will be very easy to work from it. It is worked in point de feston
and star wheels; the border is in point d'esprit. The insertion is
finished on either side with a row of button-hole stitches.

       *       *       *       *       *

522.--_Lace Border in Guipure D'Art_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 8 or 10.

This border may be used for various purposes; it makes a pretty edging
for toilet cushions if worked in fine thread, and looks equally well for
trimming couvrettes, &c., in No. 2 thread. The netting is nine holes
wide, the stitches employed are point d'esprit and point de feston, the
edge is in button-hole stitch, the netted ground is cut away outside the
scallops.

[Illustration: 522.--Lace Border in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

523.--_Square for D'Oyley_

Materials: Frame; 1 square of netting; Mecklenburg reel thread Nos. 8
and 10; needle No. 6.

[Illustration: 523.--Pattern of Square for D'Oyley.]

This square may be used to form part of a couvrette, or a d'oyley, or
pincushion. The three other corners of the square are worked exactly
like the one seen in illustration; the rosette in the centre is shown in
full size. The square is worked in point d'esprit, linen stitch, and
point de reprise. Each of the leaves of the foliage is worked in one
hole of the netting; they are worked by throwing the cotton three times
across the hole, and working darning stitch on them. The stem is worked
in overcast on the thread of the netting. The daisy in the centre is
worked like the leaves, each leaf taking up one or more holes of the
netting.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 524.--Corner Border in Guipure d'Art.]

524 _and_ 525.--_Corner Borders in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 2 for
couvrettes, No. 8 for pillow-cases, No. 16 for lace edgings.

These corner borders are suitable for pillow-cases or small couvrettes;
the stitches worked on these patterns are linen stitch, darning stitch,
point de Bruxelles, and wheels. The edge is formed by button-hole
stitches. The netting is cut away after these are worked.

[Illustration: 525.--Corner Border in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

526.--_Strip of Insertion in Guipure d'Art._

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 8.

This strip of insertion is 8 stitches wide, and is worked in zigzag
lines of point de feston, with a border of point d'esprit and point de
toile; a four-point star occupies the centre of the triangle left by the
zigzag line. This pattern is so easy to work that it hardly needs
description, the only part requiring care being the squares of point de
feston; these are begun in the centre, and the thread should be drawn
rather tightly so as to form a good square.

[Illustration: 526.--Pattern for a strip of Insertion in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

527.--_Small Square_.

Materials: Frame; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No.
4, 6, or 8 for the netting, and No. 16 for the pattern.

[Illustration: 527.--Small Square.]

Work over a mesh measuring 2-1/10 inch round the foundation of each
square, which has seven stitches in length, and as many in breadth. It
is embroidered in darning stitch, and point d'esprit, and wheels. The
outer edge is worked round in button-hole stitch. Larger squares are
worked in the same manner, only a few rows larger in length and breadth.
The squares are fastened together with a few stitches, and sewn on the
pincushion or any article they are intended to ornament.

       *       *       *       *       *

528.--_Insertion in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 8, or
16 for very fine work.

This strip of insertion is very pretty, and can be used for all kinds of
lingeries. The size of the material depends, of course, on the use to
be made of the insertion. The guipure pattern is worked in linen stitch
and point d'esprit, the raised leaves in darning stitch. The edges are
worked round with button-hole stitches.

[Illustration: 528.--Insertion in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

529.--_Rosette in Guipure d'Art._

[Illustration: 529.--Rosette in Guipure d'Art.]

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 6.

This rosette is worked in point de toile and small wheels. A larger
wheel occupies the centre, and is ornamented with a round of overcast.

       *       *       *       *       *

530.--_Quarter of a Square in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: One guipure frame; Mecklenburg thread Nos. 6 and 12; needle
No. 7.

[Illustration: 530.--Quarter of a Square in Guipure d'Art.]

This pattern shows, in full size, one quarter of a square in guipure
d'art. The outer border is in point d'esprit, then comes a border in
linen stitch. There are large stars in the corners; these stars are
worked in raised darning stitch only, and fastened on the netting at the
points of each brand; in the centre of the star there is a wheel (see
No. 515) edged with button-hole stitch. The pattern for the centre, one
quarter of which only is seen in the illustration, consists of 4
branches forming small triangles in point de Bruxelles, 4 open-worked
stars or wheels worked over 4 holes of the netting, and a four-branched
centre of point de feston with a wheel in the middle.

       *       *       *       *       *

531 _and_ 532.--_Square Patterns in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s linen thread No. 2 for the
netting, and their Mecklenburg thread for the guipure stitches No. 8.

[Illustration: 531.--Square Pattern in Guipure d'Art.]

No. 531. The outer border of this pretty square is worked in point
d'esprit, the inner border in point de toile; then follows a round of
small wheels or rosettes.

For these, fasten the cotton to one of the knots of the first square
stitch of this round, work one loop upon each of the three other knots,
so as to form a slanting cross; then work round the centre point of the
cross, passing alternately under and over its branches, then twist the
cotton over the threads of the foundation until the next square is
reached, and begin another wheel.

[Illustration: 532.--Square Pattern in Guipure d'Art.]

The centre of No. 531 is composed of wheels and point de reprise; the
pattern round the centre is worked in point de feston, differing a
little from that given on pages 505 and 506, but the illustration
clearly shows the difference.

No. 532 has similar borders to No. 531; the centre is occupied by a star
(see page 512) in point de feston; four large wheels surround this; the
square stitches between are filled with small wheels and with groups of
long loops, fastened together in sheaves. Point d'esprit and point de
toile, worked one way only, complete this square.

       *       *       *       *       *

533 _to_ 536.--_Four Patterns in Guipure d'Art_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 2 or 16,
according to the size of the work.

These four patterns will be found useful for filling up small squares,
or for varying the usual groundwork of point d'esprit.

[Illustration: 533.--Pattern in Guipure d'Art.]

No. 533 is a succession of point de feston stitches, which half fill
each square of the netting. This pattern must be worked with great
regularity.

[Illustration: 534.--Pattern in Guipure d'Art.]

No. 534 consists of a kind of double point d'esprit.

No. 535 is a thread twisted and taken _across_ each square, and
resembles lace stitches.

[Illustration: 535.--Pattern in Guipure d'Art.]

No. 536 is a succession of small close wheels, intermingled with point
d'esprit. This grounding is very effective.

[Illustration: 536.--Pattern in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

537.--_Lace Border for Veils, &c_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 16;
strip of square netting of the required length; oblong frame.

This simple border is easily and quickly worked. The edge is overcast,
the ground worked in point d'esprit, the border in point de toile, and
the pattern in point de reprise. When completed the netting is cut away
from the overcast edge.

[Illustration: 537.--Lace Border for Veils, &c.]

       *       *       *       *       *

538 _and_ 538_a_.--_Squares in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: 2 squares of netting of 8 holes; Messrs. Walter Evans and
Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 10 or 16, according to the fineness
required.

[Illustration: 538.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

These squares are very pretty for cravat ends, cuffs, or handkerchiefs.
They are worked on netting with very fine cotton in the usual manner,
beginning on two stitches in one corner The different stitches of the
guipure darning can be distinctly seen in illustration, and are point de
feston, point de reprise, point de toile, and point d'esprit on No. 538,
and the same stitches surround a wheel in No. 538_a_.

[Illustration: 538_a_.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 539.--Guipure d'Art Insertion.]

539.--_Insertion in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread Nos. 8 to
16; strip of netting length, required.


This insertion is worked in point de toile, and wheels worked in point
de feston. The ground in point d'esprit.

       *       *       *       *       *

540 _and_ 541.--_Square in Guipure Point de Venise (Reticella)_

Materials: Coarse or fine linen; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Mecklenburg thread No. 4 or 12.

[Illustration: 540.--Square in Point de Venise.]

[Illustration: 541.--Quarter Square in Reticella Work (Enlarged).]

This square is worked in the so-called point de Venise, together with
other squares; it is very pretty for covers, toilet cushions, &c. It is
worked on coarse or fine linen, according to the use you wish to make
of it. Prepare a square piece of linen, by drawing out long and cross
threads, so as to form perfect squares. In the pattern No. 540, which is
worked on fine linen, 28 threads have been drawn out, both the long and
cross way; 8 squares are formed in this way each time that 28 threads
have been drawn out; leave 7 or 8 threads of the ground, which form the
framework. Then fasten the piece of linen on cardboard, and work close
button-hole stitch round the inner edge Then work with darning stitch
over the long and cross threads of the ground.

From No. 541, which shows the fourth part of the square 4 times larger
than full size, it is easy to see how the framework is darned. When the
latter is entirely darned, work the patterns in the different squares in
button-hole stitch. The circular and serpentine patterns consist of 3
rows of button-hole stitch; the patterns which imitate whole rosettes
and half rosettes are worked in rows of button-hole stitch. For each row
the thread must be first drawn from one place to the other, as can be
seen in illustration, and fastened on the framework. The knots in the
last button-hole stitched row are made by working in each stitch when
completed, another stitch, and drawing the cotton again through the
first completed knot. It is easy, however, to work all the patterns from
No. 541. The dotted lines in the right-hand corner show the direction of
the patterns which are wanting there. The square is edged all round with
an open-work hem, which can also be worked from No. 541.

       *       *       *       *       *

542 _and_ 543.--_Corner Patterns in Guipure d'Art_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 14.

These patterns are very pretty for cushions, handkerchiefs, &c. The
netted ground is to be worked from the corner. Cast on 2 stitches, and
work in rows backwards and forwards, increasing 1 stitch at the end of
every row. The pattern is worked in point d'esprit, linen, and darning
stitch, as can be seen in illustration.

[Illustration: 542 and 543--Corner Borders.]

       *       *       *       *       *

544.--_Flower for Ornamenting Cravats and Caps in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Black or coloured silks, or Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Mecklenburg thread No. 10.

[Illustration: 544.--Flower in Guipure d'Art.]

This pattern is worked with middle-sized light-coloured purse silk in
guipure d'art on netting. This pattern can also be worked with white
thread or black silk in point de reprise.

       *       *       *       *       *

545.--_Work Basket with Covering of Darned Netting_.

Materials: Bamboo cane basket; blue satin; cardboard; netting; Messrs.
Walter Evans and Co's Mecklenburg thread No. 16.

[Illustration: 545.--Work Basket Covered with Guipure d'Art.]

This elegant basket is made of bamboo cane and blue satin, fastened on
cardboard, and covered with guipure d'art. The stand of varnished bamboo
is twelve inches long, seven and a half inches wide, and five and a half
inches high. The case inside is made of cardboard, covered on both sides
with blue satin, and the guipure d'art on the outside only. The stitches
used are point de toile, point de reprise, and point d'esprit.

       *       *       *       *       *

546 _and_ 547.--_Squares in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 12 or
20; and point d'esprit according to the fineness required.

[Illustration: 546.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

Both these square patterns are suitable for ornamenting lingerie,
cravats, collars, &c. Repeated at regular intervals on a larger centre,
they are likewise suitable for couvrettes, cushions, pillow-cases, &c.;
they are worked in darning and linen stitch.

[Illustration: 547.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

548.--_Insertion in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Strip of netting 6 holes wide, and of the required length;
Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 8 or 12.

This simple insertion consists of double rows of wheels worked at each
side of a strip of point d'esprit, an edge of button-hole stitches being
worked between the rows.

[Illustration: 549.--Guipure d'Art Insertion.]


       *       *       *       *       *

550 _and_ 551.--_Squares for Antimacassar_.

Materials: Square of netting of 12 holes; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co's
Mecklenburg thread No. 8.

[Illustration: 550.--Square for Antimacassar.]

No. 550 is very quickly worked. The border and groundwork in point
d'esprit, the centre star in point de reprise, the pattern in point de
toile. Wheels fill in the four holes in the centre of the squares.

No. 551 has a border in point d'esprit, the star is worked in point de
feston, the other stitches are point de toile. Wheels in part of star
pattern No. 518.

[Illustration: 551.--Square for Antimacassar.]

       *       *       *       *       *

552 _and_ 553.--_Borders in Guipure d'Art_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 8 or 16.

These corner borders are very suitable for couvrettes, and, worked with
fine thread, for pocket-handkerchiefs. The netted ground of the borders
is to be worked in the size seen in illustration; for the border No. 553
darn the ground in button-hole stitch, darning stitch, point d'esprit,
and point de feston; the pattern No. 552 is worked in linen stitch and
point d'esprit; small wheels are also to be worked. Both borders are to
be worked round in button-hole stitch; the netted ground is cut away
along the outside.

[Illustration: 552.--Border in Guipure d'Art.]

[Illustration: 553.--Border in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

554 _and_ 555.--_Squares in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 20;
netted squares of 7 and 8 holes.

[Illustration: 554.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

These two small squares are suitable for ornamenting cravats, lappets
for caps and lingeries. They are worked in darning and linen stitch. The
centre part of the square, No. 554, is a small wheel covered with raised
stitches.

[Illustration: 555.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

556.--_Square in Guipure d'Art_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 12.

The centre of this square is worked in point de feston as well as the
border; point de toile forms the groundwork of the square in the
centre, round which a row of button-hole stitch is worked.

[Illustration: 556.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

557.--_Insertion in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Strip of netting of 4 holes in width; Messrs. Walter Evans
and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 12.

The ground of this simple pattern is worked in point d'esprit, square
wheels are worked in the centre of the strip.

[Illustration: 557.--Insertion in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

558 _to_ 563.--_Different Strips of Insertion, Rosettes and Lace, in
Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Fine white cotton; Messrs. Waiter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg
thread Nos. 16 and 20.

These strips of insertion, rosettes, and borders are very suitable for
ornamenting lingeries, cravats, &c. The ground of insertion, Nos. 558
and 560, is worked with fine white cotton over a fine steel
knitting-needle, in slanting netting, and darned with thread in the
manner seen in illustrations. The ground of each strip is 11 rounds
wide, and worked with button-hole stitch along the edges; the darned
patterns can be worked from illustration.

[Illustration: 558.--Insertion in Guipure d'Art.]

[Illustration: 559.--Insertion in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 560.--Rosette in Guipure d'Art.]

For the rosette, No. 560, cast on 6 stitches over a fine
knitting-needle, and join the stitches into a circle; in the 1st round
work 2 stitches in every stitch. In the 2nd--5th rounds work 2 stitches
in every increased stitch of the preceding round, and in every other
stitch 1 stitch. In the 6th round take a steel knitting-needle double
the size of the first, and work over it 1 stitch in every stitch of the
preceding round. Then work the 7th round over the fine needle as
follows:--

[Illustration: 561.--Border in Guipure d'Art.]

Draw always the second stitch of 2 stitches through the first, and work
1 stitch in the stitch which has been drawn through the first, and then
1 stitch through the other stitch. In the 8th round work always 2
stitches in the stitch between the 2 crossed stitches, 1 stitch in all
the other stitches. Lastly, darn the rosette, from illustration, with
fine glazed cotton.

For the ground of the rosettes, illustrations Nos. 562 and 563, cast on
6 stitches, join the stitches into a circle, and work then in the 1st
round 2 stitches in every stitch; in the following 8 rounds 2 stitches
in every increased stitch, in all the other stitches 1 stitch. The last
(10th) round is worked without increasing. Then darn the rosettes, from
illustrations, with thread in darning stitch, linen stitch, and point
d'esprit. The edges of the two rosettes are worked round in button-hole
stitch; in every selvedge stitch work 3 button-hole stitches. These two
rosettes can be joined together for small couvrettes.

[Illustration: 562.--Rosette in Guipure d'Art.]

[Illustration: 563.--Rosette in Guipure d'Art.]

The ground of the border, No. 561, is formed by a strip of straight
netting 9 squares wide, cut out in vandykes on one side, and worked
round in button-hole stitch, as seen in illustration. This ground is
darned, from No. 561, in darning stitch, point d'esprit, linen stitch,
and ornamented with bars and wheels (See illustration).

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 564.--Corner Border in Guipure d'Art.]

564 _and_ 565.--_Corner Borders in Guipure d'Art_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 20 for
handkerchief, or No. 8 for couvrettes.

These corner borders are suitable for handkerchiefs, couvrettes, &c., or
as strips of insertion for cushions or pillow-cases. They are worked with
more or less fine cotton, according to the use they are meant for.
They are edged round with button-hole stitch on the outside, and
finished off with a row of crochet purl. Work 1 double in every
button-hole stitch; after every other stitch draw out the loop on the
needle about one-tenth of an inch; take out the needle and leave the
loop as a purl; take up 1 loop in last double stitch, and cast it off
with the next double stitch.

[Illustration: 565.--Corner Border in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

566.--_Jewel Case, forming Pincushion_.

Materials: Deal box; satin ruche; satin ribbon; quilted satin and silk
cord; guipure netting.

This case consists of a square cardboard or deal box, lined with satin,
and slightly quilted; it is also covered on the top with satin, and
ornamented all round with a satin ruche four-fifths of an inch wide,
pleated in the manner seen in illustration. The top of the box is
stuffed so as to form a pincushion. It is then covered with guipure
d'art No. 567. Ornament all round with silk cords, and at the corners
with bows of satin ribbon.

[Illustration: 566.--Jewel Case, with Pincushion.]

       *       *       *       *       *

567.--_Guipure Pattern for Jewel Case_.

Materials: Netting 25 holes square; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Mecklenburg thread No. 14.

This cover is worked in point d'esprit, point de toile, point
de reprise, and point de feston. Thick dots are introduced occasionally.

[Illustration: 567.--Guipure Pattern for Jewel Case (No. 566).]

       *       *       *       *       *

568.--_Parasol Cover in Guipure d'Art. (Seepage 580.)_

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 20, and
cotton No. 80.

For working this cover, one part of which is shown in our illustration
two-thirds of its full size, work first a straight strip of netting for
the foundation, which must count as many holes in width as are required
for the width of the covering. The size of the holes depends on the size
of the knitting-needle or mesh which you use. The pattern is worked with
cotton No. 80, over a steel knitting-needle which measures two-fifths of
an inch round. Begin the strip in one corner. Cast on 2 stitches, and
work in rows backwards and forwards, increasing 1 stitch at the end of
every row, till you have 1 stitch more than the stripe is to have holes
in width, on our pattern 68 stitches; then work 1 row on the same number
of stitches, and then increase alternately 1 stitch at the end of 1 row,
and decrease 1 at the end of the next, till the strip is 250 stitches
long. The strip is finished off in a straight line at the bottom by
working a certain number of rows in which the last stitch remains
untouched. At the beginning of the row do not work 1 stitch ever the
mesh, but only 1 knot in the stitch of the preceding row, so that the
cotton is drawn on tight. When the strip is completed, trace from No.
568 the outlines for the pattern of each of the eight parts of the
parasol with double thread, in such a manner that two parts lie next to
each other, but reversed, that is, the point of one part must lie next
to the wide part of the next part. Then work in each part the pattern
seen in illustration, and afterwards each part round with button-hole
stitch, working over the double outline. Cut out the different parts,
and sew them together on the wrong side with close overcast stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 569.--Scent Sachet in Guipure d'Art.]

569.--_Scent Sachet in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 18;
green satin; poudre d'iris; green satin ribbon; green silk cord.

The size of the netting depends on that of the sachet. The netting must
be fastened in a frame, and darned with fine thread; the flowers are
worked in darning stitch, and the ground in point d'esprit. The cushion
is made of green satin, perfumed with poudre d'iris. When the netting
has been fastened on, it is edged all round with a green satin ruche,
and green silk cord, forming loops at every corner.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 570.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

570.--_Square in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Netted square of 26 stitches; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s
Mecklenburg thread No. 12.

This pattern is worked in point d'esprit, edged with an outline of
point de reprise. This outline may be worked in close button-hole
stitch. Point de toile is used for the groundwork, upon which point de
reprise is worked.

       *       *       *       *       *

571 _and_ 572.--_Work Case in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Blue satin; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread
No. 16; blue silk cord.

[Illustration: 571.--Work Case in Guipure d'Art (Back).]

This little work-case, of darned netting and blue satin, is five inches
and four-fifths long, four inches wide, and is fastened with a loop and
button. The back, front, side, and the flap are worked all in one piece.
The netting is worked with white thread No. 12, over a mesh measuring at
least two-fifths of an inch round. For the flap the netting must be
slanted off on both sides; this is done either by decreasings, or by
cutting off the corners of the work. The latter is then darned in linen
stitch, darning stitch, and point d'esprit, from No. 572, which shows
the front of the case, and from No. 571, which shows the back. The
netting is then lined with blue satin, and sewn together at the sides
with button-hole stitches on the right side. The flap is edged with
button-hole stitch; sew on a small button, and make a small loop to
correspond. The case is edged all round with blue silk cord.

[Illustration: 572.--Work Case in Guipure d'Art (Front).]

       *       *       *       *       *

573.--_Banner Screen in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Netting; Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread
No. 12; carved oak stand; glacé silk; cords; tassels.

Banner-screens are used in two ways, either suspended from the
mantelpiece or mounted as shown in illustration No. 573. The banner is
23 inches long, 19 inches wide, lined with coloured glacé silk, and
edged with a lace border of guipure d'art. The design for the banner is
given in page 554. Work the netting for the groundwork over a larger or
smaller mesh, according to the size you wish it to be. The pattern is
worked in point d'esprit, point de reprise, and point de toile. When the
 pattern is completed, line the banner with coloured silk, edge with a
gathered border of guipure d'art, finish with coloured silk cords and
tassels. The banner may be finished off in close button-hole stitch,
instead of adding the lace border.

[Illustration: 573.--Banner Screen in Guipure d'Art.]

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 575.--Border in Guipure d'Art.]

575.--_Border in Guipure d'Art_.

Material: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 8.

This border is suited for couvrettes. It is worked in point d'esprit,
point de reprise, or plain darning stitch, edged by a row of
button-hole, and finished with a crochet edging.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 576.--Square in Guipure d'Art.]

576.--_Square in Guipure d'Art_.

Materials: Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.'s Mecklenburg thread No. 12;
netted square of 20 holes.

This pretty square is worked in a pattern formed by point de feston,
point de toile, and point de reprise, the star in the centre as that
shown on page 514, omitting the alternate points; border of point
d'esprit, ground worked in simple crossed bars.

Table of the right size of Mecklenburg thread to use in working:--

|----------------------------------|--------------|
|                                  |    No.       |
|----------------------------------|--------------|
|  Antimacassars                   |    2         |
|  Borders                         |    4         |
|  Handkerchiefs                   |    20        |
|  Insertions                      |    8         |
|  Lace edgings and insertions     |    16        |
|  Lamp shades                     |    16        |
|  Parasol covers                  |    18        |
|  Sachets                         |    12        |
|  Sofa cushions                   |    8         |
|  Toilet cushions                 |    10        |
|  Toilet mats                     |    10        |
|----------------------------------|--------------|

       *       *       *       *       *

FRAMES

May be obtained for large, middle-size, and small squares.

Oblong frames are used for working insertions and lace edgings.

       *       *       *       *       *




BERLIN WORK


INSTRUCTIONS.

Berlin Work includes every kind of stitch which is made upon canvas with
wool, silk, or beads. The principal stitches used are common cross
stitch, Gobelin stitch, leviathan stitch, raised or velvet stitch, tent
stitch, and others. The materials and needle must always be carefully
chosen of a corresponding size. For common cross stitch and raised
stitch Penelope canvas must be used; for small articles, such as
slippers, bags, or borders, single Berlin wool is preferable; for larger
ones fleecy wool or double Berlin wool (the latter, however, is much
more expensive). For Gobelin stitch and tent stitch undivided canvas
(not Penelope) is required. Purse silk is often used for the latter; it
is more brilliant than floss silk or filoselle. Floss silk is generally
used for other stitches because it covers the thread of the canvas
better than purse silk; it is, however, often replaced by filoselle,
which is a much cheaper material. Moss wool is hardly ever used. Before
beginning to work upon a piece of canvas the raw edges must be hemmed or
sewn over with wool. Care must be taken not to crumple the canvas in
the course of the work. It is best to roll one end of the canvas upon a
round piece of deal while the other end is kept down upon the table with
a lead cushion. Handsome artistic patterns should always be worked in a
frame. When you undertake to work a large pattern begin in the centre,
and complete one half before you commence the other. Always work the
stitches in the same direction, from the top downwards--this is very
essential to the beauty and regularity of the pattern.

Always begin with the colour which is used the oftenest; those colours
that lose their dye in working must be put in last. When the pattern is
finished begin the grounding. The wool must not be drawn too tightly,
otherwise the threads of the canvas appear. If the wool is too coarse
for the canvas, one long stitch is to be made from left to right as far
as the particular colour is to be worked, and over this long stitch,
cross back in the usual way.

The plainest stitch in Berlin wool work is the common cross stitch;
illustrations 577 to 584 show varieties of the same.

We now proceed in the following pages to show, by description in writing
and by most careful illustration, all the stitches which are used in
Berlin Work. These are numerous, but neither too great in number nor too
simple or too elaborate in execution for those who aspire to become
Berlin workers.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 577.--Common Cross Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 577.--The common cross stitch is worked in rows backwards
and forwards over 2 threads in height and 2 in width (square of the
canvas) in straight lines; the 1st row is worked from left to right; the
2nd row, which completes the stitches, from right to left. Illustration
577 shows 2 rows of completed stitches and 1 row in course of working.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 578.--Long Cross Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 578 shows the long cross stitch. It is worked like the
preceding one, only over 4 threads in height and 2 in width.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 579.--Long Cross Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 579 shows a long cross stitch, which is worked like the
preceding one, except that 2 threads are missed between 2 stitches, and
in the next row the stitches are worked between those in the preceding
row. This stitch is not worked in rows backwards and forwards; each
stitch is completed before beginning the next.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 580.--Slanting Cross Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 580.--The long slanting cross stitch is worked like No.
578, in rows backwards and forwards; the 1st row is slanting, the 2nd is
straight. The places for inserting the needle and for drawing it out are
marked on the illustration with a cross and dot.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 581.--Damask Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 581.--The damask stitch is worked in single rows from left
to right, over 4 threads in height and 2 in width. The stitches of one
row come between those of the next. The cross and dot shown in
illustration are where to insert and draw out the needle.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 582.--Rep Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 582 shows the rep stitch--a variety of the preceding. The
first half of it is worked slantways over 6 threads in height and 2 in
width, the second half, like the common cross stitch, from right to left
over the 3rd and 4th of the 6 canvas threads; each stitch is completed
at once. The illustration shows the last stitch being worked; the first
half of the stitch is completed; the dot shows where the needle must be
inserted for the second half; it is drawn out where the cross is placed
on illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 583.--Leviathan Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 583.--The leviathan stitch consists of 1 slanting and 1
straight cross stitch over 4 threads in height and 4 in width. Each
stitch is completed immediately. No. 583 shows one half of the stitch
completed and the wool as it must be placed for working the first half
of the straight cross stitch.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 584.--Leviathan Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 584.--The leviathan stitch is worked exactly like the
preceding, only the stitches are not worked on the same threads in the
different rows, as may be seen from illustration.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 585.--Double Leviathan Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 585.--The double leviathan stitch is a variety of the
preceding; it is worked over 6 threads in height and as many in width.
Make a common cross stitch over these 6 threads, then a long cross
stitch in height and a long cross stitch in width. Illustration 585
shows 2 stitches completed and 1 being worked.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 586.--Tent Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 586.--Tent stitch. Each stitch is worked over 1 stitch in
height and 1 in width, and is worked in rows from left to right.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 587.--Slanting Gobelin Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 587.--The slanting Gobelin stitch is worked on undivided
canvas; each stitch is worked over 3 threads in height and 2 in width,
divided from the next stitch only by an interval of 1 thread.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 588.--Straight Gobelin Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 588.--The straight Gobelin stitch is worked over 2 threads
in height with 1 thread between, so that the stitches appear more
raised; they are worked over thin cord or a thick piece of wool.

       *       *       *       *       *

ILLUSTRATION 589.--The raised or velvet stitch is worked over small
round wooden meshes, and forms small raised loops. Take 2 similar meshes
and as many threaded needles as there are colours in the work; make
first a slanting stitch, as for the beginning of the common cross
stitch, but instead of drawing out the needle straight under the place
where it was inserted, draw it out exactly at the same place, so as to
form a slanting stitch on the right and on the wrong side; then begin to
work over 1 mesh; insert the needle above it and draw it out in a
slanting direction underneath. On the wrong side of the work a regular
cross stitch is formed. Illustration 589 shows 2 rows of velvet stitch
completed and 2 rows being worked; the first of the latter is yet on the
mesh, the second being worked so as to show the position of the wool
upon the mesh. Observe that the rows of the velvet stitch are worked
upwards, and that 2 meshes are necessary, because the lower one must not
be drawn out before the next row is completed. The loops may be cut open
if preferred.

[Illustration: 589.--Raised or Velvet Stitch.]

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration: 590.--Plaited Stitch.]

ILLUSTRATION 590.--The plaited stitch is worked like the herring-bone
stitch. Each stitch is worked over 4 threads in height and 4 in width.
Illustration 590 shows one part of the plaited stitch completed, and the
place where the needle is to be inserted for the next stitch is marked
by a dot. For the next stitch the needle is carried under the 2 threads
below the stitches of the preceding row.

       *       *       *       *       *

ILLUSTRATION 591.--The plush stitch is also worked upwards. Begin to
work a common cross stitch, then insert the needle through the canvas
over 2 threads in height and 2 in width, downwards in a slanting
direction. Do not draw the wool close up, but leave a loop hanging down
about four-fifths of an inch long, and make 1 more common cross stitch
to fasten the loop. This stitch can also be worked over flat meshes.
Work a common cross stitch at the end of every row. When the work is
completed the loops are cut open and clipped, as may be seen from
illustration.

[Illustration: 591.--Plush Stitch.]

       *       *       *       *       *

ILLUSTRATIONS 592 to 594.--Three Berlin wool work borders for trimming
baskets, &c. No. 592.--The 2 outer rows which edge the border are worked
in long straight cross stitch; each stitch is crossed in the centre with
a back stitch.

[Illustration: 592.--Berlin Work Border.]

The grounding consists of 2 rows of vandykes placed opposite each other,
which are formed of long straight stitches of different lengths. The
squares in the centre are formed in the same way, and are completed in
the middle with a knot. No. 593.--The ground is worked in cross stitch,
the raised patterns in satin stitch; in the middle of each pattern there
is a cross stitch. The outer rows are worked in half cross stitch over 2
threads in height and 4 in width in 2 different shades. No. 594.--The
petals of the flowers are worked over 4 threads in height and in width,
and consisting of 4 slanting stitches.

[Illustration: 593--Berlin Work Border.]

[Illustration: 594.--Berlin Work Border.]

In the centre the flower is completed by a knot; the ground in cross
stitch is completed on either side by a narrow border of scallops,
formed of slanting stitches divided in the centre by 1 slanting stitch.
It is easy to work these stitches from illustration. The choice of
colours depends upon what use the border is intended for and upon
personal taste.

       *       *       *       *       *



  PLATES

  [Illustration: TATTED ANTIMACASSAR (see page 80).]

  [Illustration: 214--COUVRETTE IN APPLIQUÉ]

  [Illustration: 334--KNITTED TABLE COVER (_see page_ 347).]

  [Illustration: 337--KNITTED D'OYLEY (_see page_ 352).]

  [Illustration: 568.--PARASOL COVER IN GUIPURE D'ART
                                      (_see page 549_).]




  INDEX.

  ACACIA SPRAY in embroidery, 162.

  Antimacassar, crochet, 276.

  Antimacassar in tatting, 65.

  Antimacassar, knitted, 318 to 320.

  Appliqué, pattern for a couvrette in, 213 to 215.

  Arm-chair, covered with crochet, 254.

  Arm-chair in crochet, patterns for, 255,256.


  BABY'S BOOT, knitted, 326.

  Bag, crochet silk, over rings, 245.

  Banner screen in guipure d'art, 573, 574.

  BARS, POINT LACE.

    D'Alençon, 463.

    Point d'Angleterre, 467.

    Point de Venise, edged, 468.

    Point de Venise, dotted, 469.

    Raleigh, 471, 472.

    Sorrento, 461, 462.

    Sorrento, dotted, 469.

    Venetian, plain, 464, 465, 466.

  Basket, small, crochet, 239.

  Basket, crochet, 272.

  Basket, crochet, 273.

  Basket, embroidered in chenille, 134.

  Bedford plaited lace (1851), 423.

  Bed-quilt, knitted border for, 327.

  BERLIN WOOL-WORK INSTRUCTIONS, p. 559.
  Berlin work, borders in, 592 to 594.

  BERLIN STITCHES.

    Common cross stitch, 577.

    Damask stitch, 581.

    Leviathan stitch, 583, 584.

    Leviathan double stitch, 585.

    Long cross stitch, 578, 579.

    Plaited stitch, 590.

    Plush stitch, 591.

    Raised or velvet stitch, 589.

    Rep stitch, 582.

    Slanting cross stitch, 580.

    Slanting Gobelin stitch, 587.

    Straight Gobelin stitch, 588.

    Tent stitch, 586.

  (Black lace) Buckingham point trolly (1851), 422.

  Bodice, knitted, 324, 325.

  Boot, baby's, knitted, 326

  Borders, crochet, 252, 253

  Border, embroidered, 150.

  Border for a reading-desk in embroidery, 204.

  Border for couvrettes, guipure d'art, 561.

  Borders for handkerchief, corner, in guipure d'art, 564, 565.

  Borders, guipure d'art, 552, 553, 557.

  Border, guipure d'art, 575.

  Border in crochet and tatting, 52.

  Border in Oriental embroidery, 179.

  Border in tatting and crochet, 6.

  Border in tatting and crochet, 15.

  Border in tatting and crochet, 22.

  Border in tatting and lace stitch, 44.

  Border in tatting, with beads, 13.

  Border in tatting, with crochet edging, 5.

  Border, knitted, 321.

  Border, tatting, 47.

  Borders, two crochet, 274, 275.

  Border, with beads, tatted, 13.

  Bouquet, embroidered, for travelling-bag, 169.

  Braces, embroidered, 202.

  Braces, knitted, 338.

  Brioche cushion in crochet, 249.

  Butterfly, embroidered, for handkerchief corner, 212.


  CAP, border for, in tatting, 38.

  Cap crown in tatting, 37.

  Cap in tatting, 38, 39.

  Chenille, basket embroidered in, 134.

  Cigar-case, embroidered, 190.

  Circle for collars, cuffs, &c., in tatting, 21.

  Circle in tatting, 12.

  Circle in tatting, 21.

  Circle in tatting, 57.

  Collar in tatting, 56.

  Collar in tatting and darned netting, 28.

  Collar, linen, trimmed with tatting, 49.

  Collar, linen, trimmed with tatting, 54.

  Collar, pine pattern, in tatting, 1.

  Collar, tatted, 55.

  Collar, trimming for, in tatting, 49.

  Collar, trimming for, in tatting, 54.

  Comforters, &c., knitting stitch for, 336.

  Convolvulus leaf insertion in embroidery, 141.

  Corner borders in guipure d'art, 524, 525.

  Corner borders in guipure d'art, 542, 543.

  Corner borders in guipure d'art, 564, 565.

  Corner for handkerchief in point Russe embroidery, 149.

  Corner in embroidery, 151.

  Corner in embroidery, 152.

  Cotton, tatting, page 82.

  Couvrette, centre of a tatted, 25.

  Couvrette, daisy pattern for a, in crochet, 250.

  Couvrette for arm-chair in crochet, 257.

  Couvrette in appliqué, embroidery, 147.

  Couvrette in crochet, 240 to 243.

  Couvrette in tatting, 25.

  Covering for a quilted counterpane in embroidery, 138.

  Cravats, &c., in embroidery, patterns for, 184.

  Cravats, &c., in embroidery, patterns for, 185.

  Cravat in tatting, 50.

  Cravat end in embroidery, 136.

  Cravat end in embroidery, 153.

  Cravat end in raised embroidery, 156.

  Cravat end in tatting, 60.

  Cravat end in tatting, 62.

  Cravat end in tatting and darned netting, 64.

  Cravat end, oval, in tatting, 51.

  Cravat in muslin and tatting, 50.

  Cravat, muslin, embroidered, 153.

  Crochet, antimacassar in, 276.

  Crochet, arm-chair covered with, 254.

  Crochet, arm-chair, patterns for, 255, 256.

  Crochet bag, silk, over rings, 245.

  Crochet basket, small, 239.

  Crochet basket, 272.

  Crochet basket, 273.

  Crochet borders, 252, 253.

  Crochet borders, two, 274, 275.

  Crochet, brioche cushion, 249.

  Crochet, couvrette for arm-chair, 257.

  Crochet, couvrette in, 240 to 243.

  Crochet, daisy pattern for a couvrette in, 250.

  Crochet D'Oyleys in Imitation of Point Lace.

    No. 1, 262.

    No. 2, 263.

    No. 3, 264.

    No. 4, 265.

    No. 5, 266.

    No. 6, 267.

    No. 7, 268.

    No. 8, 269.

    No. 9, 270.

    No. 10, 271.

  Crochet garter, 285.

  Crochet, insertion, 258.

  Crochet, insertion, 259.

  Crochet, insertion, 260.

  Crochet, insertion, 277.

  Crochet, insertion, 283.

  Crochet, insertion, 284.

  CROCHET INSTRUCTIONS.

    Crochet hook, page 185.

    Foundation chain, double, 217.

    Foundation chain, plain, 216.

    Foundation chain, purl, 218.

    Spots, raised, 232.

    Spots, hollow, 233.

    Spots, open work, 234.

  Crochet, lace, 251.

  Crochet, lace, 261.

  Crochet, purse in, over rings, 248.

  Crochet rosettes, 280, 281.

  Crochet sovereign purse, 246.

  Crochet, star in, 244.

  Crochet, stars in, 247.

  CROCHET STITCHES.

    Cross stitch, 224.

    Cross treble stitch, 229, 230, 231.

    Double long treble stitch, 228.

    Double stitch, 220, 221.

    Long double stitch, 225.

    Long treble stitch, 227.

    Purl stitch, 236.

    Purl stitch, 237.

    Purl stitch, 238.

    Raised treble stitch, 235.

    Raised ribbed stitch, 222.

    Raised slanting stitch, 223.

    Slip stitch, 219.

    Treble stitch, 226.

  Crochet trimming for a lady's chemise, 286.

  Crochet trimming, with embroidered flowers worked in
    appliqué and velvet ribbon, 282.

  Crochet work, tobacco-pouch in, 278, 279.

  Crochet work, work-basket in straw and, 272, 273.

  Curtains, knitted pattern for, 339.


  Daisy pattern for a crochet couvrette, 250.

  Dalecarlian lace, 419.

  Diamond in tatting, 20.

  Diamond in tatting, 36.

  Diamond in tatting, 53.

  Diamond in tatting, 59.

  Diamond netting, 306.

  Diamond tatting for collars, &c., 20.

  D'Oyleys, Crochet, in Imitation of Point Lace.

    No. 1, 262.

    No. 2, 263.

    No. 3, 264.

    No. 4, 265.

    No. 5, 266.

    No. 6, 267.

    No. 7, 268.

    No. 8, 269.

    No. 9, 270.

    No. 10, 271.

  D'Oyley, knitted, 337.


  EDGINGS AND PURLED EDGINGS, POINT LACE.

    Antwerp, 479.

    Point d'Angleterre, 477.

    Point de Bruxelles, 474,

    Point d'Espagne, 478.

    Point de Venise, 476.

    Sorrento, 475.

  Edging, embroidered, 178.

  Embroidered border, 204.

  Embroidered border, 150.

  Embroidered bouquet for travelling bag, 169.

  Embroidered braces, 202.

  Embroidered braces, full-sized pattern for, 201.

  Embroidered braces, full-sized pattern for, 203.

  Embroidered butterfly for handkerchief corner, 212.

  Embroidered cigar-case, 190.

  Embroidered edging, 178.

  Embroidered handkerchief, 197.

  Embroidered hanging letter-case, 176.

  Embroidered in chenille, basket, 134.

  Embroidered key-bag, 182.

  Embroidered key-bag, 183.

  Embroidered knife-basket, 159.

  Embroidered knife-basket, 160.

  Embroidered lace insertion, 207.

  Embroidered lady's purse, 157.

  Embroidered letter-case, pattern for, 177.

  Embroidered linen collar, 193.

  Embroidered linen collar, 194.

  Embroidered needle-book, pattern for, 166.

  Embroidered needle-book, pattern for, 167.

  Embroidered penwiper, full-sized circle for, 187.

  Embroidered slipper, on Java canvas, 208.

  Embroidered slipper, point russe stitch for, 209.

  Embroidered what-not, in the shape of a hammock, 195, 196.

  Embroidery, acacia spray in, 162.

  Embroidery and stitching, insertion in, 132.

  Embroidery, appliqué, couvrette in, 147.

  Embroidery border for a reading-desk, 204.

  Embroidery, border in Oriental, 179.

  Embroidery, convolvulus leaf insertion in, 141.

  Embroidery, corner for handkerchief in point Russe, 149.

  Embroidery, corner in, 151.

  Embroidery, corner in, 152.

  Embroidery, covering for a quilted counterpane in, 138.

  Embroidery, cravat end in, 136.

  Embroidery, cravat end in, 153.

  Embroidery, cravat end in raised, 156.

  Embroidery, fuchsia spray in, 161.

  Embroidery, glove-box in, 174.

  Embroidery, glove-box in, 175.

  Embroidery, handkerchief border in, 197.

  Embroidery, handkerchief in, 140.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 131.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 142.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 145.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 146.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 155.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 165.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 188.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 189.

  Embroidery, insertion in, 192.

  EMBROIDERY INSTRUCTIONS, p. 83.

    Bead partly covered, 103.

    Blossom in satin stitch, 101, 102.

    Bluebell, 113.

    Bluebell, inner part, 114.

    Bluebell, part of, 116.

    Borders, 118, 119.

    Ear of corn, 112.

    Flower, 115.

    Flower in satin stitch, 107.

    Flower appliquéd on net, 117,

    Heartsease, 110.

    Initials, 123 to 130.

    Insertions, 120 to 122.

    Leaf, 94.

    Leaf in raised satin stitch, 90, 91.

    Leaf, raised, 92, 93.

    Leaf, raised, 95.

    Leaf, half of, 99.

    Leaf, centre of, 100.

    Raised embroidered leaf, 98.

    Raised flower, 111.

    Raised leaf, 96.

    Raised leaf, 97.

    Raised satin stitch leaf, 90, 91.

    Rose in satin stitch, 108.

    Rose, petal for, 109.

    Star, 106.

    Star in point de reprise, 105.

    Star in satin stitch, 104.

  STITCH, EMBROIDERY.

    Stitch, back, 70.

    Stitch, button and eyelet holes, 86, 87.

    Stitch, button-hole scallop, 82 to 85.

    Stitch, double overcast, 67.

    Stitch, knotted, 73, 74, 75.

    Stitch, ladder, 80, 81.

    Stitch, overcast, 68.

    Stitch, point croisé, 71, 72.

    Stitch, point de minute, 79.

    Stitch, point de plume, 78.

  STITCH, EMBROIDERY--_continued_.

    Stitch, satin, raised, 76, 77.

    Stitch, scallop, 66.

    Stitch, shaded button-hole, 88, 89.

    Stitch, slanting overcast, 89.

  Embroidery, medallion for a purse in, 198.

  Embroidery, medallion for a purse in, 199.

  Embroidery, medallion in point Russe, 210.

  Embroidery, medallion in point Russc, 211.

  EMBROIDERY, MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS IN.

    Embroidery, alphabet in coral stitch, 353.

    Embroidery, alphabet in floral, 361.

    Embroidery, alphabet in florid style, 356.

    Embroidery, alphabet in forget-me-nots, 352.

    Embroidery, alphabet, point d'or, 357.

    Embroidery, alphabet, raised satin stitch, 359.

    Embroidery, alphabet in satin stitch, 351.

    Embroidery, alphabet scalloped, 355.

    Embroidery, alphabet, small, 354.

    Embroidery, initials in, 366 to 417.

    Embroidery, monograms in, 366 to 417.

    Embroidery, names in, 362 to 418.

    Embroidery, sampler in, 360.

    Embroidery, star alphabet, capitals, 349.

    Embroidery, star alphabet, small, 350.

    Embroidery, white, alphabet in, 358.

  Embroidery, pattern for collars, cuffs, &c., in, 135.

  Embroidery, pattern for collars, cuffs, &c., in, 137.

  Embroidery, pattern for cravats, &c., in, 184.

  Embroidery, pattern for cravats, &c., in, 185.

  Embroidery, pattern for cravat ends, &c., in, 133.

  Embroidery, pattern for cravat ends, &c., in, 139.

  Embroidery, pattern for trimming lingeries in, 143, 144.

  Embroidery pattern for what-not (full size), 196.

  Embroidery, penwiper in, 186, 187.

  Embroidery, rose-leaf in, 173.

  Embroidery, sandwich-case in, 154.

  Embroidery stars, 137, 143, 144.

  Embroidery stars, 180, 181.

  Embroidery, table-napkin ring in, 158.

  Embroidery, tobacco-pouch in, 163.

  Embroidery, tobacco-pouch in, 164.

  Embroidery, travelling-bag in, 168.

  Embroidery, trimming in, for bodices, 170.

  Embroidery, Venetian border in, 206.

  Embroidery, Venetian, lappet or sash end in, 205.

  Embroidery, waste-paper basket in, 191.

  Embroidery, white, toilet-cushion cover in, 171, 172, 173.

  Embroidery, wing of bird, 172.

  Embroidery, work-bag in, 200.

  Embroidery, wreath in, for centre of pincushion or toilet-mat, 148.

  English netting, 308


  Fichu, netted, 315, 316.

  Flower in guipure d'art, 544.

  Frame for guipure d'art 503.

  Full-sized circle for embroidered pen-wiper, 187.

  Fuchsia spray in embroidery, 161.


  Garter, crochet, 285.

  Glove-box in embroidery, 174.

  Glove-box in embroidery, 175.

  Gauge, knitting, 287.

  Guipure d'art.

  Guipure d'art, banner-screen in, 573, 574.

  Guipure d'art, border for couvrettes in, 561.

  Guipure d'art t, borders for handkerchief, corner, 564, 565.

  Guipure d'art, borders in, 552, 553, 557.

  Guipure d'art, border in, 575.

  Guipure d'art, corner borders in, 524, 525.

  Guipure d'art, corner borders in, 542, 543.

  Guipure d'art, corner borders in, 564, 565.

  Guipure d'art, flower in, 544.

  Guipure d'art, frame for, 503.

  Guipure d'art, insertion in, 521.

  Guipure d'art, insertion in, 526.

  Guipure d'art, insertion in, 528.

  Guipure d'art, insertion in, 539.

  Guipure d'art, insertion in, 548.

  Guipure d'art, insertion in, 558.

  Gaipure d'art, insertion in, 559.

  Guipure d'art, insertions, &c., in, 558 to 563.

  Guipure d'art, instructions in, p. 503.

  Guipure d'art jewel-case cover, 567.

  Guipure d'art, jewel-case covered in, 566.

  Guipure d'art, lace borders for veils in, 537.

  Guipure d'art, lace border in, 522.

  Guipure d'art, parasol-cover in, 568.

  Guipure d'art, quarter square in, 530.

  Guipure d'art, rosettes in, 529.

  Guipure d'art, rosettes in, 562, 563.

  Guipure d'art stitches.

    Grounding, 533 to 536.

    Point de Bruxelles, 509, 510.

    Point d'esprit, 504.

    Point de feston, 506.

    Point de reprise, 507, 508.

    Point de toile, 505.

    Stars, 516 to 520.

    Wheels, 511 to 515.

  Guipure d'art, scent-sachet in, 569.

  Guipure d'art, small squares, 527.

  Guipure d'art, squares for antimacassar, 550, 551.

  Guipure d'art, square for d'oyley in, 523.

  Guipure d'art, squares in, for dresses, 546, 547.

  Guipure d'art, square in, 531.

  Guipure d'art, square in, 532.

  Guipure d'art, square in, 556.

  Guipure d'art, squares in, 570, 576.

  Guipure d'art, squares in, 533 to 536.

  Guipure d'art, squares in, 538, 538a.

  Guipure d'art, squares in, 554, 555.

  (Guipure d'art), square in reticella work, 540.

  (Guipure d'art), square in reticella work, enlarged, 541.

  Guipure d'art,   work-basket   covered with, 545.

  Guipure d'art, work-case in, 571, 572.


  Handkerchief border in embroidery, 197.

  Handkerchief in embroidery, 140.

  Hanging letter-case embroidered, 176.

  Honiton guipure lace, 424.


  Insertion, crochet, 258.

  Insertion, crochet, 259.

  Insertion, crochet, 260.

  Insertion, crochet, 277.

  Insertion, crochet, 283.

  Insertion, crochet, 284.

  Insertion in embroidery, 131.

  Insertion in embroidery, 142.

  Insertion in embroidery, 145.

  Insertion in embroidery, 146.

  Insertion in embroidery, 155.

  Insertion in embroidery, 165.

  Insertion in embroidery, 188.

  Insertion in embroidery, 189.

  Insertion in embroidery, 192.

  Insertion in embroidery and stitching, 132.

  Insertion in guipure d art, 521.

  Insertion in guipure d'art, 526.

  Insertion in guipure d'art, 528.

  Insertion in guipure d'art, 539.

  Insertion in guipure d'art, 548.

  Insertion in guipure d'art, 558.

  Insertion in guipure d'art, 559.

  Insertions in guipure d'art, 558 to 563.

  Insertions in tatting, 2.

  Insertion in tatting, 7.

  Insertion in tatting, 11.

  Insertion in tatting, 14.

  Insertion in tatting, 24.

  Insertion in tatting, 31.

  Insertion in tatting, 32.

  Insertion in tatting and crochet, 41.

  Insertion in tatting and crochet, 43.

  Insertion in tatting and lace stitch, 23.

  Insertion in tatting for trimming lingeries, 11.

  Insertion, knitted, 340.

  Insertion, wide, tatting, 10.

  Insertion, wide, tatting, 14.

  Insertion, wide, tatting, 43.

  Insertion, worked in tatting, 10.

  INSTRUCTIONS IN BERLIN WOOL WORK, p. 559.

    Berlin work, borders in, 592 to 594.

    Berlin stitches.

    Common cross stitch, 577.

    Damask stitch, 581.

    Leviathan stitch, 583, 584.

    Leviathan double stitch, 585.

    Long cross stitch, 578, 579.

    Plaited stitch, 590.

    Plush stitch, 591.

    Raised or velvet stitch, 589.

    Rep stitch, 582.

    Slanting cross stitch, 580.

    Slanting Gobelin stitch, 587.

    Straight Gobelin stitch, 588.

    Tent stitch, 586.

  INSTRUCTIONS IN CROCHET.

    Crochet hook, p. 185.

    Foundation chain, double, 217.

    Foundation chain, plain, 216.

    Foundation chain, purl, 218.

    Spots, raised, 232.

    Spots, hollow, 233.

    Spots, open work, 234.

  INSTRUCTIONS IN EMBROIDERY.

    Bead partly covered, 103.

    Blossom in satin stitch, 101, 102.

    Bluebell, 113.

    Bluebell, inner part, 114.

    Bluebell, part of, 116.

    Borders, 118, 119.

    Ear of corn, 112.

    Flower, 115.

    Flower in satin stitch, 107.

    Flower appliquéd on net, 117.

    Heartsease, 110.

    Initials, 123 to 130.

    Insertions, 120 to 122.

    Leaf, 94.

    Leaf, half of, 99.

    Leaf, centre of, 100.

    Leaf in raised satin stitch, 90, 91.

    Leaf, raised, 92, 93.

    Leaf, raised, 95.

    Raised embroidered leaf, 98.

    Raised flower, 111.

    Raised leaf, 96.

    Raised leaf, 97.

    Raised satin stitch leaf, 90, 91.

    Rose in satin stitch, 108.

    Rose, petal for, 109.

    Star, 106.

    Star in point de reprise, 105.

    Star in satin stitch, 104.

  STITCH, EMBROIDERY.

    Stitch, back, 70.

    Stitch, button and eyelet holes, 85, 87.

    Stitch, button-hole scallop, 82 to 85.

    Stitch, double overcast, 67.

    Stitch, knotted, 73, 74, 75.

    Stitch, ladder, 80, 81.

    Stitch, overcast, 68.

    Stitch, point croisé, 71, 72.

    Stitch, point de minute, 79.

    Stitch, point de plume, 78.

    Stitch, satin raised, 76, 77.

    Stitch, scallop, 66.

    Stitch, shaded button-hole, 88, 89.

    Stitch, slanting overcast, 69.

  INSTRUCTIONS IN GUIPURE D'ART, p. 503.

  INSTRUCTIONS IN TATTING.
    Joining the work, p. v.
    Pin, tatting, p. ii.
    Shuttles, tatting, pp. i, iii.
    The way to hold the hands, p. iii.
    The way to make a loop in tatting, p. iv.
    The way to make a purl, p. v.
    The way to make a stitch in tatting, p. iv.


  JEWEL-CASE cover, guipure d'art, 567.
    Jewel-case covered in guipure d'art, 566.


  KEY-BAG, embroidered, 182.

  Key-bag, embroidered, 183.

  Knee-cap, knitted, 322.

  Knife-basket, embroidered, 159.

  Knife-basket, embroidered, 160.

  Knitted antimacassar, 318 to 320.

  Knitted baby's boot, 326.

  Knitted bodice, 324, 325.

  Knitted border, 321.

  Knitted border for bed-quilt, 327.

  Knitted braces, 338.

  Knitted comforters, pattern for, 336.

  Knitted counterpanes, pattern for, 313.

  Knitted cover for sofa-cushion, 341, 342.

  Knitted curtains, patterns for, 339.

  Knitted d'oyley, 337.

  Knitted insertion, 340.

  Knitted knee-cap, 322.

  Knitted neckerchief, 323.

  Knitted pattern, 345.

  Knitted pattern, with embroidery, 332.

  Knitted purse, lady's, 317.

  Knitted quilt, 328.

  Knitted shawl, 346 to 348.

  Knitted sleeping sock, 314.

  Knitted sock for a child, 312.

  Knitted table-cover, 333, 334.

  Knitted veil, 330, 331.

  Knitting cotton, table of sizes of, p. 368.

  Knitting gauge, 287.

  Knitting, looped, 335.

  Knitting, materials required for, 287.

  Knitting needles, 287.

  KNITTING ON, 287.

  Knitting, rosette for antimacassar in, 319.

  KNITTING STITCHES.

    Brioche stitch, 301.

    Casting off, 295.

    Casting on, 288.

    Decreasing, 293.

    Increasing, 292.

    Knitting on, 289.

    Knotted stitch, 299.

    Looped knitting, 335.

    Moss borders, 300.

    Peacock's tail pattern, 297.

    Picking up stitches, 296.

    Plain knitting, 290.

    Purling, 291.

    Round knitting, 294.

    Spiral stitch, 298.

    Knitting stitch for comforters, &c., 32.


  LACE, Bedford plaited (1851), 423.

  (Lace, black), Buckingham point troll (1851), 422.

  Lace border for veils in guipure d'art 537.

  Lace border in guipure d'art, 522.

  Lace, crochet, 251.

  Lace, crochet, 261.

  Lace, Dalecarlian, 419.

  Lace, deep, in tatting, 27.

  Lace edging in tatting, 3.

  Lace edging in tatting, 4.

  Lace, Honiton guipure, 424.

  Lace insertion, embroidered, 207.

  Lace in tatting and crochet, 40.

  Lace, Mechlin (Queen Charlotte's), 4

  Lace, netted, 309.

  Lace, netted, open, 310.

  Lace, old Mechlin, 420.

  LACE POINT.

    Braid, placing the, 442.

    Braids, 426 to 431.

    Cords, p. 453.

    Edgings, 474 to 479.

    General directions for working, pp. 453, 454.

    Materials required, p. 451.

    Modes of working dots and picots, 470, 473.

    Scissors for, 425.

    Threads, sizes of, p. 500.

  Lace, tatted, 26.

  Lace, tatted, 27.

  Lady's embroidered purse, 157.

  Lady's veil in net and tatting, 16, 17.

  Lappet or sash-end in. Venetian embroidery, 205.

  Linen collar embroidered, 193.

  Linen collar embroidered, 194.

  Linen tatting-bag, 46.

  Linen bag for tatting cotton, 30.

  Looped knitting, 335.


  MATERIALS required fur knitting, 287.

  Materials required for netting. 302.

  Mechlin lace (Queen Charlotte's), 421.

  Medallion for a purse in embroidery, 198.

  Medallion for a purse in embroidery, 199.

  Medallion for trimming lingeries in tatting, 58.

  Medallion in point Russe embroidery, 210.

  Medallion in point Russe embroidery, 211.

  Medallion, tatting, 58.

  Mignardise and tatting, 29.

  MONOGRAMS AND INITIALS IN EMBROIDERY.

    Alphabet, coral stitch embroidery, 353.

    Alphabet, floral embroidery, 361.

    Alphabet, florid style of embroidery, 356.

    Alphabet, forget-me-nots (embroidered), 352.

    Alphabet, point d'or (embroidered), 357.

    Alphabet, raised satin stitch embroidery, 359.

    Alphabet, satin stitch (embroidered), 351.

    Alphabet, scalloped, in embroidery, 355.

    Alphabet, small, in embroidery, 354.

    Alphabet, star, capitals, in embroidery, 349.

    Alphabet, star, small, in embroidery, 350.

    Alphabet, white, embroidery, 358.

    Initials in embroidery, 366 to 417.

    Monograms in embroidery, 366 to 417.

    Names in embroidery, 362 to 418.

    Sampler in embroidery, 360.

  Muslin cravat, embroidered, 153.


  Neckerchief, knitted, 323.

  Needle and mesh for netting, 302.

  Needles, knitting, 287.

  Netted fichu, 315, 316.

  Netted lace, 309.

  Netted nightcaps, 343, 344.

  Netted open lace, 310.

  Netted shell border, 311.

  Netting, 302.

  Netting, 303.

  NETTING STITCHES.

    Diamond, 306.

    English, 308.

    Bound, 305, 307.

    Square, 304.

  Netting, materials required for, 302.

  Netting needle and mesh, 302.

  Nightcaps, netted, 343, 344.


  Old Mechlin lace, 420.

  ON KNITTING, 287.


  Parasol-Cover in guipure d'art, 568.

  Patterns for arm-chair crochet borders, 255, 256.

  Pattern for a couvrette in appliqué, 213 to 215.

  Pattern for collars, cuffs, &c., in embroidery, 135.

  Pattern for collars, cuffs, &c., in embroidery, 137.

  Pattern for cravats, &c., in embroidery, 184.

  Pattern for cravats, &c., in embroidery, 185.

  Patterns, embroidery, for what-not (full size), 196.

  Pattern for cravat ends, &c., in embroidery, 133.

  Pattern for cravat ends, &c., in embroidery, 139.

  Pattern for embroidered braces (full size), 201.

  Pattern for embroidered braces (full size), 203.

  Pattern for embroidered letter-case, 177.

  Pattern for embroidered needle-book, 166.
  Pattern for embroidered needle-book, 167.

  Pattern for knitted comforters, 336.

  Pattern for knitted counterpanes, 313.

  Pattern for trimming lingeries in embroidery, 143, 144.

  Patterns for veil in tatting, 18, 19.

  Pattern, knitted, 345.

  PATTERNS, POINT LACE.

    Alphabet, 502.

    Alphabet, description of, 500 to 502.

    Bars, d'Alençon and Sorrento, 494.

    Borders, 482, 483.

    Collars, 493, 496.

    Cravat end, 487.

    Design for point lace collar, lappets, &c., 490.

    Dress trimming, 492.

    Edgings, 488, 489.

    Handkerchief border, 485.

    Insertion (Limoges), 484.

    Lappet, 490.

    Lappet, 497.

    Letter __A in point lace, 500, 501.

    Medallion, 481.

    Oval for cravats, 491.

    Star, 480.

    Toilet cushion centre, 486.

    Wheels, close English, 495.

  Penwiper in embroidery, 186, 187.

  Point Lace.

    Braid, placing the, 442.

    Braids, 426 to 431.

    Cords, p. 453.

    Edgings, 474 to 479.

    General directions for working, 453, 454.

    Materials required, p. 451.

    Modes of working dots or picots, 470, 473.

    Scissors for, 425.

    Threads, sizes of, p. 500.

  Point Lace Bars.

    D'Alençon, 463.

    Point d'Angleterre, 467.

    Point de Venise, edged, 468.

    Point de Venise, dotted, 469.

    Raleigh, 471, 472.

    Sorrento, 461, 462.

    Sorrento, dotted, 469.

    Venetian, plain, 464, 465, 466.

  Point lace edgings and purled edgings.

    Antwerp, 479.

    Point d'Angleterre, 477.

    Point do Bruxelles, 474.

    Point d'Espagne, 478.

    Point de Venise, 476.

    Sorrento, 475.

  Point lace patterns.

    Alphabet, 502.

    Alphabet, description of, 500, 502.

    Bars, d'Alençon and Sorrento, 494.

    Borders, 482, 483.

    Collars, 493, 496.

    Cravat end, 487.

    Design for point Lice collar, lappets, &c., 490.

    Dress trimming, 492.

    Edgings, 488, 489.

    Handkerchief border, 485.

    Insertion (Limoges), 484.

    Lappet, 490.

    Lappet, 497.

    Letter _A_ in point lace, 500, 501.

    Medallion, 481.

    Oval for cravats, 491.

    Star, 480.

    Toilet cushion centre, 486.

    Wheels, close English, 495.

  Point lace stitches.

    Brussels lace, 433, 434.

    Escalier lace, 454.

    Mechlin lace, 453.

    Point d'Angleterre, 444.

    Point d'Angleterre, enlarged, 445.

    Point d'Anvers, 498.

    Point d'Alençon, 442.

    Point d'Alençon, 443.

    Point Brabançon, 449.

    Point de Bruxelles, 433, 434.

    Point de Cordova, 447.

    Point d'Espagne, 437.

    Point d'Espagne; close, 438.

    Point d' Espagne, treble, 439.

    Point de fillet, 450.

    Point de fillet and point reprise, 451.

    Point de Grecque, 440, 499.

    Point de reprise. 448.

    Point de tulle, 452.

    Point Turque, 446.

    Point de Valenciennes, 441.

    Point de Venise, 435.

    Point de Venise, petit, 436.

    Spanish point, 455.

  Point lace wheel and rosettes.

    English, plain, 458.

    English, raised, 459.

    Mechlin, 453.

    Rosette for centres, 460.

    Sorrento, 456, 457.

    Wheels and rosettes, 456, 457.

  Point Russe stitch for embroidered slipper, 209.

  Purse, crochet sovereign, 246.

  Purse in crochet over rings, 248.

  Parse in tatting and beads, 42.

  Purse, knitted, 317.


  Quarter-square in guipure d'art, 530.

  Quilt, knitted, 328.


  Rose-leaf in embroidery, 173.

  Rosettes, crochet, 280, 281.

  Rosettes, embroidery and tatting, 48, 61, 63.

  Rosette for antimacassar in knitting, 319.

  Rosettes in guipure d'art, 529, 562, 563.

  Rosette in tatting, 8.

  Rosette in tatting, 34.

  Rosette in tatting, 35.

  Rosette in tatting, 45.

  Rosette in tatting and embroidery, 48.

  Rosette in tatting and embroidery, 61.

  Rosette in tatting and embroidery, 63.

  Round netting, 305, 307.


  SANDWICH-CASE in embroidery, 154.

  Scent-sachet in guipure d'art, 569.

  Shawl, knitted, 346 to 348.

  Shell border, netted, 311.

  Sleeping sock, knitted, 314.

  Slipper, embroidered on Java canvas, 208.

  Sock, knitted, for a child, 312.

  Sofa-cushion, knitted cover for, 341, 342.

  Squares for antimacassar in guipure d'art, 550, 551.

  Square for d'oyley in guipure d art, 523.

  Square, guipure d'art, 531.

  Square, guipure d'art, 532.

  Square, guipure d'art, 556.

  Squares, guipure d'art, 570, 576.

  Squares in guipure d'art, 533 to 536.

  Squares in guipure d'art, 538, 538a.

  Squares in guipure d'art, 554, 555.

  Squares in guipure d'art for dresses, 546, 547.

  Square in reticella work (guipure d'art), 540.

  Square in reticella work (guipure d'art), enlarged, 541.

  Square in tatting for pincushion or couvrette, 33.

  Square netting, 304.

  Squares, small, in guipure d'art, 527.

  Star, crochet, 244.

  Stars in crochet, 247.

  Stars in embroidery, 137, 143, 144.

  Stars in embroidery, 180, 181.

  Star in tatting, 9.

  STITCHES, CROCHET.

    Cross stitch, 224.

    Cross treble stitch, 229, 230, 231.

    Double long treble stitch, 228.

    Double stitch, 220, 221.

    Long double stitch, 225.

    Long treble stitch, 227.

    Purl stitch, 236.

    Purl stitch, 237.

    Purl stitch, 238.

    Raised treble stitch, 235.

    Raised ribbed stitch, 222.

    Raised slanting stitch, 223.

    Slip stitch, 219.

    Treble stitch, 226.

  STITCHES, GUIPURE D'ART.

    Grounding, 533 to 536.

    Point de Bruxelles, 509, 510.

    Point d'esprit, 504.

    Point de feston, 506.

    Point de reprise, 507, 508.

    Point de toile, 505.

    Stars, 516 to 520.

    Wheels, 511 to 515.

  STITCHES, KNITTING.

    Brioche stitch, 301.

    Casting off, 295.

    Casting on, 288.

    Decreasing, 293.

    Increasing, 292.

    Knitting on, 289.

    Knotted stitch, 299.

    Looped knitting, 335.

    Moss borders, 300.

    Peacock-tail pattern, 297.

    Picking up stitches, 296.

    Plain, 290.

    Purling, 291.

    Round knitting, 294.

    Spiral stitch, 298.

  STITCHES, NETTING.

    Diamond, 306.

    English, 308.

    Round, 305, 307.

    Square, 304.

  STITCHES, POINT LACE.

    Brussels lace, 433, 434.

    Escalier lace, 454.

    Mechlin lace, 453.

    Point d'Alençon, 442.

    Point d'Alençon, 443.

    Point d'Angleterre, 444.

    Point d'Angleterre, enlarged,

    Point d'Anvers, 498.

    Point Brabançon, 449.

    Point de Bruxelles, 433, 434.

    Point de Cordova, 447.

    Point d'Espagne, 437.

    Point d'Espagne, close, 438.

    Point d'Espagne, treble, 439.

    Point de fillet, 450.

    Point de fillet and point reprise, 451.

    Point de Grecque, 440, 499.

    Point de reprise, 448.

    Point de tulle, 452.

    Point Turque, 446.

    Point de Valenciennes, 441,

    Point de Venise, 435.

    Point de Venise, petit, 436.

    Spanish point, 455.


  TABLE-COVER, knitted, 333, 334.

  Table-napkin ring in embroidery, 153.

  Table of sizes of knitting cotton, p. 363.

  Tatting and beads, purse in, 42.

  Tatting and crochet, border in, 22.

  Tatting and crochet, border in, 52.

  Tatting and crochet, insertion in, 41.

  Tatting and crochet, insertion in, 43.

  Tatting and crochet, lace in, 40.

  Tatting and darned netting, collar in, 28.

  Tatting and darned netting, cravat-end in, 64.

  Tatting and embroidery, rosette in, 48.

  Tatting and embroidery, rosette in, 61.

  Tatting and embroidery, rosette in, 63.

  Tatting and lace stitch, insertion in, 23.

  Tatting and mignardise, 29.

  Tatting and muslin, cravat in, 50.

  Tatting and net, lady's veil in, 16, 17.

  Tatting, antimacassar in, 65.

  Tatting-bag, linen, 46.

  Tatting, border, 47.

  Tatting, border for cap in. 6.

  Tatting, border in crochet and, 15.

  Tatting, border in crochet and, 22.

  Tatting, border in, with crochet edging, 5, 6.

  Tatting, border in lace stitch and, 44.

  Tatting, border, with beads, 13.

  Tatting, cap-crown in, 37.

  Tatting, cap in, 38, 39.

  Tatting, circle for collars, cuffs, &c., in, 21.

  Tatting, circle in, 12.

  Tatting, circle in, 21.

  Tatting, circle in, 57.

  Tatting, collar in, 55.

  Tatting, collar in, 56.

  Tatting, collar, pine pattern in, 1.

  Tatting-cotton, p. 82.

  Tatting-cotton, linen bag for, 30.

  Tatting, couvrette, centre of a, 25.

  Tatting, cravat-end in, 60.

  Tatting, cravat-end in, 62.

  Tatting, oval cravat-end in, 51.

  Tatting, cravat in, 50.

  Tatting, deep border in crochet and, 52.

  Tatting, deep lace in, 27.

  Tatting, diamond in, 20.

  Tatting, diamond in. 36.

  Tatting, diamond in, 53.

  Tatting, diamond in, 59.

  Tatting, diamond, for collars, &c., 20.

  Tatting, insertion, 27.

  Tatting, insertion, 11.

  Tatting, insertion, 14.

  Tatting, insertion, 24.

  Tatting, insertion, 31.

  Tatting, insertion, 32.

  Tatting, insertion in, for trimming lingeries, 11.

  Tatting, insertion worked in, 10.

  TATTING INSTRUCTIONS.

    Joining the work, p. v.

    Pin, tatting, p. ii.

    Shuttles, tatting, pp. i, iii.

    The way to hold the hands, p. iii.

    The way to make aloop in tatting, p. iv.

    The way to make a purl, p. v.

    The way to make a stitch in tatting, p. iv.

  Tatting, lace, 26.

  Tatting, lace, 27.

  Tatting, lace edging in, 3.

  Tatting, lace edging in, 4.

  Tatting, linen collar trimmed with, 49.

  Tatting, linen collar trimmed with, 54.

  Tatting, medallion for trimming lingeries in, 58.

  Tatting, oval cravat-end in, 51.

  Tatting, patterns for veils in, 18, 19.

  Tatting, rosette in, 8.

  Tatting, rosette in, 34.

  Tatting, rosette in, 35.

  Tatting, rosette in, 45.

  Tatting, square in, for pincushion or couvrette, 33.

  Tatting, star in, 9.

  Tatting, trimming for collar in, 49.

  Tatting, trimming for collar in, 54.

  Tatting, wide insertion in, 10.

  Tatting, wide insertion in, 14.

  Tatting, wide insertion in, 43.

  Tatting, with beads, border in, 13,

  Tobacco-pouch in crochet work, 278, 279.

  Tobacco-pouch in embroidery, 163.

  Tobacco-pouch in embroidery, 164.

  Toilet-cushion cover in white embroidery, 171, 172, 173.

  Travelling-bag in embroidery, 168.

  Trimming, crochet, with embroidered flowers
    worked in appliqué and velvet ribbon, 282.

  Tramming for a lady's chemise, in crochet, 286.

  Trimming in embroidery for bodices, 170.


  VEIL, knitted, 330, 331.

  Veil, lady's, in net and tatting, 16, 17.

  Veils, patterns for, in tatting, 19.

  Venetian border in embroidery, 206.


  WASTE-PAPER basket in embroidery, 191.

  What-not, embroidered in the shape of a hammock, 195, 196.

  WHEELS AND ROSETTES, POINT LACE.

    English plain, 458.

    English raised, 459.

    Mechlin, 453.

    Rosette for centres, 460.

    Sorrento, 456, 457.

    Wheels and rosettes, 456, 457.

  Wing of bird in embroidery, 172.

  Work-bag in embroidery, 200.

  Work-basket covered with guipure d'art, 545.

  Work-basket in straw and silk crochet* work, 272, 273.

  Work-case in guipure d'art, 571, 572.

  Wreath in embroidery for centre of pin-cushion or toilet-mat, 148.

       *       *       *       *       *






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